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Full text of "Annual reports"

MEDFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, MA 



3 1848 00202 0407 



OF MEDFIELD 








MEDFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY 
MEDFIELD, MA 02052 




Dedication September 2004 



354 th Annual Report 

of the 

Town Offices 



For The Year Ending December 31, 2004 



, 




The Memorial School opened for students for the beginning of the 2004 school 
year. An opening celebration and rededication was held in October of 2004 that 
highlighted the original purpose of the naming of Memorial School which was 
to recognize the sacrifice of World War II Veterans. The newly renovated 
building provides adequate space for all programs and has resulted in a healthy 
environment for the children and staff. 




354 th Anniversary 



ANNUAL REPORT 



DEDICATION 



In 2004 Jack O' Toole retired after 26 years of service in the 
Inspection Department. During that time he served in various 
capacities as an Assistant Building Inspector, Building Inspector, 
Zoning Enforcement Officer, Field Driver, Fence Viewer and a 
member of the Blasting Study Committee. In his quiet way Jack 
represented the best of the Inspection Department. Most residents 
know little of the work of the various inspectors, unless they are 
building or remodeling a house, starting a business, or having a 
problem with a zoning violation. The Building, Electrical, Plumbing 
and Gas Inspectors and the Zoning Enforcement Officers do their 
work with little fanfare. They prefer it that way. Their efforts, 
however, have contributed immeasurably to the safety of 
Medfield's residents, the quality of the residential and commercial 
structures and overall character and desirability of the Town. As 
Jack steps down to enjoy a well-deserved second retirement, it is 
fitting that we recognize his contributions and the contributions of 
all of the members of the Inspection Department, who have served 
the Town well. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports2004medf 



IN MEMORIAM 



Town Accountant 



Leslie J. Howlett 



1943-1975 



Board of Selectmen 



Harry A. Kelleher 



1968-1977 



Council on Aging 



Carl J. Brewer 



1986-2001 



F. Paul Quatramoni 

School Committee 1984-1994 

School Planning and Building Committee 1 990- 1 998 



STATE 





SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES 
FOR MEDFIELD 



Senator in General Court 

Norfolk, Bristol, and Plymouth District 

James E. Timilty 

State House Room 206 

Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-1222 

james.timilty@state.ma.us 



Representative in General Court 

13* Norfolk District, Precinct 1 & 2 

Lida Harkins 

State House Room 343 

Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-2883 

Rep.LidaHarkins@hou.state.ma.us 

Representative in General Court 

9th Norfolk District, Precinct 3 & 4 

Richard Ross 

State House Room 237 

Boston, MA 02133 

(617) 722-2305 

Richard.ross@state.ma.us 



Governor's Councillor 

2 nd District 
Kelly A. Timilty 
State House Room 184 
Boston, MA 02133 
(617) 727-2795 



FEDERAL 






U.S. Representative to Congress, 9 th District 

Stephen F. Lynch 

John J. Moakley Federal Courthouse 

Suite 3110 

Boston, MA 02210 

(617)428-2000 

stephen.lynch@mail.house.gov 

United States Senator 

Edward M. Kennedy 
2400 J.F.K. Federal Building 
Boston, MA 02203 
(617)565-3170 
senator@kennedy. senate . gov 

United States Senator 

John F. Kerry 

1 Bowdoin Square, 10 th Floor 

Boston, MA 021 14 

(617)565-8519 

john_kerry@kerry.senate.gov 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Incorporated 


1651 


Population 


12,853 as of December 31, 2004 


County 


Norfolk • 


Size 


14.43 square miles 


Miles of Highway 


74.72 


Elevation 


180 feet above sea level at the Town House 


Registered Voters 


8,093 as of December 31, 2004 




Democrats 1,606 




Republicans 1,537 




No Party or Designation 4,894 




Other 56 



Government 



Official Notices 



Board of Selectmen 

Annual Town Election is the last Monday in March 

Open Town Meeting is the last Monday in April 

All Town Board and Commission meetings are posted on 
the Town House bulletin board 



Tax Rate 

Taxes Due 

Town House Hours 

Library Hours 



Transfer Station 
Hours 



12.69 per thousand of assessed valuation (7/1/03-6/30/04) 
12.92 per thousand of assessed valuation (6/30/04-7/1/05) 

August 1 st , November 1 st , February 1 st , and May 1 st 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM 
Thursday, 8:30 AM to 7:30 PM 
Friday, 8:30 AM to 1 :00 PM 

Monday-Thursday, 10:00 AM to 8:00 PM 
Friday, Saturday, 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM 
Sunday, Closed 

Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, 9 AM to 4 PM 



ELECTED AND APPOINTED OFFICIALS 

2004-2005 



Elected Officials 



Moderator 




Housing Authority 




Scott F. McDermott 


2005 


L. Paul Galante, Sr. 


2005 






Valerie A. Mariani, state appointment 


2006 


Town Clerk 




Lisa Donovan 


2007 


Carol A. Mayer 


2006 


James T. Regan 


2008 






Richard D. Jordan 


2009 


Board of Selectmen 








Paul B. Rhuda 


2005 


Trust Fund Commissioners 




Osier L. Peterson 


2006 


Evan S. Weisenfeld 


2005 


Ann B. Thompson 


2007 


Georgia Colivas 


2006 






Stephen T. Pelosi 


2007 


Board of Assessors 








Francis W. Perry 


2005 


Appointed bv the Board of Selectmen 


Bruce J. Beardsley 


2006 






R. Edward Beard 


2007 


Fire Chief 








William A. Kingsbury 


2007 


School Committee 








Susan C. Cotter 


2005 


Chief of Police 




Debra Noschese 


2005 


Richard D. Hurley 


2006 


Susan L. Ruzzo 


2006 






Steven E. Kramer 


2007 


Sergeants 




Carolyn P. Casey 


2007 


John L. Mayer 


2005 






John W. Wilhelmi 


2005 


Trustees of the Public Library 




Ray M. Burton 


2005 


Geoffrey C. Tritsch. resigned 


2004 


Daniel J. Burgess 


2005 


John Bankert, appointed 


2005 


Lorna C. Fabbo 


2005 


Patricia S. Fitzgerald 


2005 






Maura Y. McNicholas 


2006 






Jane M. Ready 


2006 


Police Officers 




James J. Whalen 


2007 


Lars Anderson 


2005 


Robert Luttman 


2007 


Eric Bazigian 


2005 






Michelle Bento 


2005 


Planning Board 

George N. Lester 




Richard D. Bishop 


2005 


2005 


Patrick J. Caulfield 


2005 


Stephen J. Browne 


2006 


Robert G. Flaherty 


2005 


Timothy P. Sullivan 


2007 


Dana P. Friend 


2005 


Wright Dickinson 


2008 


Shawn P. Garvey 


2005 


Elissa G. Franco 


2009 


John D. Geary 


2005 






Stephen H. Grover 


2005 


Park and Recreation Commissioners 


i 


Richard Kelleher 


2005 


Thomas A. Caragliano 


2005 


Thomas M. LaPlante 


2005 


Lisa Louttit 


2005 


Albert J. Manganello 


2005 


Stephen Farrar 


2005 


Kevin McClay 


2005 


James C. Landry 


2007 


Christine Davanage 


2005 






Andrew D. Clark 


2005 



Town Administrator 

Michael J. Sullivan 
Treasurer/Collector 

Georgia K. Colivas 



Pound Keeper 

2007 Jennifer Shaw Gates 

2006 Inspection Department 



2005 







John P. O 'Toole, Building Inspector, retired 


2005 


Superintendent of Public Works 




Walter Tortorici, Local Inspector of Bldgs 


2005 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2007 


John J. Foster HI, Asst. Building 


2005 






James C. Landry, Asst. Building 


2005 


Town Accountant 




Peter Navis, Gas, Asst. Plumbing 


2005 


Joy Ricciuto 


2006 


John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing, Asst. Gas 


2005 






John F. Fratolillo, Asst. Plumb., Asst. Gas 


2005 


Town Counsel 




James J. Leonard, wiring inspector 


2005 


Mark G. Cerel 


2005 


Joseph Wallace, Asst. Wiring 


2005 






Joseph F. Erskine, Asst. wiring 


2005 


Board of Health (3 Years) 




William F. McCarthy, Asst. wiring 


2005 


Kathleen Schapira 


2005 






Lucy Schlesinger 


2006 


Official Greeter of the Town of 




Marcia Aigler 


2007 


Medfield 




Keith Diggans 


2007 


Joseph E. Ryan 


2005 


Elizabeth Dorisca 


2007 






Frances Sullivan, Assoc 


2005 


Official Historian of the Town of 




Rebbecca L. Schiff, Assoc 


2005 


Medfield 




Gregory A. Testa, Assoc 


2005 


Richard P. DeSorgher 


2005 


Cemetery Commissioners (3 years) 




Official Keepers of the Town 




Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 


2006 


Clock 




David F. McCue 


2007 


Marc R. Tishler 


2005 


Eric W. O'Brien 


2007 


David P. Maxson 


2005 



Water and Sewer Commissioners (3 years) 

Mark R. Tishler 2005 

Neil D. Mackenzie 2006 

Gary A. Lehmann 2007 

Jeremy Marsette, Associate (1 yr) 2005 



Superintendent of Insect Pest Control 

Edward M. Hinkley 2005 

Tree Warden 

Edward M. Hinkley 2005 



Field Driver and Fence Viewer 

John P. O'Toole, retired 2005 

Animal Control Officer 

Jennifer Shaw Gates 2005 

Inspector of Animals 

Jennifer Shaw Gates 2005 



Board of Registrars (3 years) 

Thomas Sweeney, Jr. 2005 

Roberta A. Kolsti 2006 

William H.Dunlea, Jr. 2007 

Veterans' Service Officer (3 years) 

G. Marshall Chick 2005 

Sealer of Weights and Measures (3 years) 

Michael J. Clancy 2006 

Measurer of Wood and Bark (3 years) 

Michael J. Clancy 2006 



Public Weigher (3 years) 

Michael J. Clancy 

Constables and Keepers of the 
Lockup 

Eric Bazigian 
Richard D. Bishop 



2006 



2005 
2005 



Daniel J. Burgess 


2005 


Ray M. Burton, Jr. 


2005 


Robert W. Brady 


2005 


Patrick J. Caulfield 


2005 


Andrew D. Clark 


2005 


Lorna C. Fabbo 


2005 


Robert B. Flaherty 


2005 


Dana P. Friend 


2005 


Shawn P. Garvey 


2005 


John T. Garvey 


2005 


John D. Geary 


2005 


John F. Gerlach 


2005 


Stephen H. Grover 


2005 


Richard D. Hurley 


2005 


George W. Kingsbury 


2005 


Thomas M. LaPlante 


2005 


Albert J. Manganello 


2005 


Kevin McClay 


2005 


William H. Mann 


2005 


John L. Mayer 


2005 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2005 


Patricia A. Rioux 


2005 


Thomas A. Tabarani 


2005 


Christine Davanage 


2005 


John W. Wilhelmi 


2005 


Police Matrons 




Jessie A. Erskine 


2005 


Lorna C. Fabbo 


2005 


Jennifer A. Shaw Gates 


2005 


Mary V. Gillis 


2005 


Elizabeth R. Hinkley 


2005 


Elisabeth T. Mann 


2005 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2005 


Andrea Pierce Leary 


2005 


Patricia A. Rioux 


2005 


Mary L. Solari 


2005 


Sally Wood 


2005 


Renata Walter 


2005 


Special Police Officers 




Leo Acera (Millis) 


2005 


Paul J. Adams (Millis) 


2005 


George Bent (Norfolk) 


2005 


Herbert Bun- 


2005 


William Burke (Sherborn) 


2005 


Jonathan M. Caroll (Norfolk) 


2005 


Jonathan M. Cash (Dover) 


2005 


Jon Cave (Medfield) 


2005 


Alan Ciccone (Sherborn) 


2005 


Douglas Common (Dover) 


2005 



Joseph Concannon (Dover) 2005 

Richard Crosson (Sherborn) 2005 

William J. Davis (Norfolk) 2005 

Thomas G. Degnim (Norfolk) 2005 

Robert A. Dixon 2005 

Louis Droste (Norfolk) 2005 

Kenneth W. Dunbar (Dover) 2005 

William J. Dwyer (Millis) 2005 

Warren W. Eagles (Dover) 2005 

David J. Eberle (Norfolk) 2005 

Leo Either (Norfolk) 2005 

Glen R. Eykel (Norfolk) 2005 

Jeffrey M. Farrell (Dover) 2005 

William Fitzpatrick 2005 

Richard Fleming (Sherborn) 2005 

Nathan Fletcher (Norfolk) 2005 

Susan Fornaciari (Norfolk) 2005 

Robert Forsythe (Norfolk) 2005 

Terence Gallagher (Norfolk) 2005 

Jennifer Gates 2005 

Eamon D. Geoghegan (Dover) 2005 

John Gerlach 2005 

Barry Glassman 2005 

Joseph G. Griffin 2005 

Steven G. Hagan (Dover) 2005 

Thomas Hamano 2005 

John Hebb (Sherborn) 2005 

Gary Hendron (Sherborn) 2005 

Joseph Hennessey (Sherborn) 2005 

Timothy Heinz (Norfolk) 2005 

John Holmes (Norfolk) 2005 

David Holt (Norfolk) 2005 

Robert Hoist (Norfolk) 2005 

Winslow Karlson m (Norfolk) 2005 

Paul Keams 2005 

James F. Kilduff 2005 

Michael Kiessling 2005 

Stephen Kirchdorfer 2005 

Dana Kozak (Millis) 2005 

James C. Kozak (Norfolk) 2005 

William LeBlanc (Norfolk) 20Q5 

James Lopez (Millis) 2005 

David R. McConnell (Norfolk) 2005 

Peter McGowan (Millis) 2005 
Michael McLaughlin (Sherborn) 2005 

Robert Marragio (Millis) 2005 

Paul Matondi (Sherborn) 2005 

Kristopher Maxant (Millis) 2005 

Edward J. Meau (Dover) 2005 

Nicholas Meleski (Millis) 2005 



10 



Aaron J. Mick (Dover) 


2005 


Neil I. Grossman 


2005 


Charles Morreales 


2005 


Thomas S. Hamano 


2005 


James Moses (Norfolk) 


2005 


William Johnson 


2005 


Paul J. Murphy (Norfolk) 


2005 


Paul Kearns 


2005 


Linda Myers (Millis) 


2005 


Steven Krichdorfer 


2005 


John Nash 


2005 


Charles A. Morreale 


2005 


Robert Nedder 


2005 


Donald W. Reed 


2005 


Peter Opanasets (Millis) 


2005 


Wayne A. Sallale 


2005 


Thomas Quinn (Millis) 


2005 






Frederick Paulette 


2005 


Traffic Supervisors 




Andrea Pierce 


2005 


Robert W. Brady 


2005 


Robert Pimental (Sherbom) 


2005 


John T. Garvey 


2005 


Amanda Prata (Norfolk) 


2005 


Mary Gillis 


2005 


Stephen K. Plympton (Norfolk) 


2005 


Elizabeth R. Hinkley 


2005 


Donald Reed 


2005 


George W. Kingsbury 


2005 


Patricia Rioux 


2005 


Elisabeth T. Mann 


2005 


Kevin Roake (Norfolk) 


2005 


William H. Mann 


2005 


Gary C. Rowley (Dover) 


2005 


Armando B. Palmieri 


2005 


Wayne Sallale 


2005 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2005 


Christina Sena (Norfolk) 


2005 


Mary Solari 


2005 


Robert Shannon (Norfolk) 


2005 


Renata Walter 


2005 


Carl Sheridan 


2005 






Patricia Smith (Sherborn) 


2005 


Affordable Housing Committee 




Paul Smith (Millis) 


2005 


Bonnie Wren-Burgess 


2005 


John Sheams (Millis) 


2005 


Charles H. Peck 


2005 


Jared Snapp (Sherborn) 


2005 


Diane L. Maxson 


2005 


Christopher Soffayer (Millis) 


2005 


Stephen M. Nolan 


2005 


Charles Stone (Norfolk) 


2005 


Joseph Zegarelli 


2005 


Richard Strauss 


2005 


John W. McGeorge 


2005 


Tom Tabarini 


2005 


Dorothy J. Steeves 


2005 


Christopher Teel (Sherborn) 


2005 


Jeffrey Hanson 


2005 


Domenic Tiberi (Millis) 


2005 


Kristine Trierweiler, Ex Officio 


2005 


John R. Tosi (Dover) 


2005 


Ann B. Thompson, Ex officio 


2005 


Christopher VonHandorf 


2005 






Eric Van Ness (Norfolk) 


2005 


Council on Aging 




Mark Vendetti (Norfolk) 


2005 


Kathleen Kristoff 


2005 


Robert P. Vitale 


2005 


Virginia Whyte 


2006 


Joseph Waugh (Sherbom) 


2005 


Ann Ciancarelli 


2006 


Todd V. Wilcon 


2005 


Ruth Nadler 


2007 


Colin T. Wise (Dover) 


2005 


Louis Fellini 


2007 


Sally Wood 


2005 










Americans with Disabilities Compliance 


Emergency Management Agency 




Review Committee 




Richard Hurley, Director 


2005 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2005 


Arline F. Berry 


2005 


Richard D. Hurley 


2005 


Scott Brooks 


2005 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2005 


Ray M. Burton 


2005 


Frederick A. Rogers 


2005 


Jon R. Cave 


2005 






John L. Evers 


2005 


Board of Appeals on Zoning 




Barry Glassman 


2005 


Russell J. Hallisey 


2005 






Stephen M. Nolan 


2006 



11 



Robert F. Sylvia 


2007 


Charles H. Peck, Assoc (1) 


2005 


Burgess P. Standley, Assoc (1) 


2005 


Thomas M. Reis, Assoc (1) 


2005 


Med field Cultural Council 




Karen Delio 


2005 


Tobey Reed 


2005 


Ron Gustavson 


2005 


Ann Marie Sweeney 


2005 


Michael Sweeney 


2005 


Lucinda Davis 


2006 


Isabella Wood 


2006 


Lee Knowles Howell 


2006 


Francis A. Iafolla 


2006 


William F. Pope 


2007 


Martha M. Moon 


2007 



Economic Development Commission 

Patrick Casey 2005 

Paul B. Rhuda 2005 

John T. Harney 2006 

Eric O'Brien 2006 

Charles Peck 2006 

Ann B. Thompson 2007 

Paul E. Hinkley 2007 

Representative to Regional Hazardous 
Waste Committee 

Kenneth P. Feeney 2005 



Charles River Natural Storage Area 
Designees 

Kenneth P. Feeney 2007 

Michael J. Sullivan 2007 

Collective Bargaining Team 

Paul B. Rhuda 2005 

Richard D. Hurley 2005 

Michael J. Sullivan 2005 

Stephen Curran 2005 

Kristine Trierweiler 2005 

Community Gardens Committee 

Leonard C. Haigh 2005 

David J. Noonan 2005 

Conservation Commission 

Deborah Bero 2005 

Michael Perloff 2005 

Philip J. Burr 2005 

Robert Kennedy, Jr. 2006 

Bruce Redfield 2006 

Marie Zack Nolan 2007 

Ralph Parmigiane 2007 
Caroline D. Standley, Assoc (l) 2005 

Robert Aigler, Assoc (i) 2005 

Constables for Election 

Carol A. Mayer 2005 

Contract Compliance Officer 

Michael J. Sullivan 2005 



Capital Budget Committee 

Stephen S. Curran 
Donald H. Harding 
Osier L. Peterson 
Kristine Trierweiler 
Timothy P. Sullivan 
Charles Kellner 



2005 
2005 
2005 
2005 
2005 
2005 



Emergency Medical Services Response 
Committee 

David Binder, M.D. 2005 

William A. Kingsbury 2005 

Joan M. Kiessling 2005 

Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 2005 

James D. Sullivan, M.D. 2005 

Michael J. Sullivan 2005 

Ann B. Thompson 2005 

Emergency Planning Commission 

Kenneth P. Feeney 2005 

Edward M. Hinkley 2005 

Richard D. Hurley 2005 

William A. Kingsbury 2005 

Michael J. Sullivan 2005 

Ann B. Thompson 2005 

Enforcing Officer for Zoning 

John P. O'Toole, retired 2005 

Enterprise Fund Committee 

Georgia K. Colivas 2005 

Kenneth P. Feeney 2005 

Michael J. Sullivan 2005 

MarkR.Tishler 2005 

Kristine Trierweiler 2005 

Joy Ricciuto 2005 



12 







Sheila Joyce 


2005 


Fair Housing Officer 




Weston Kolsti 


2005 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2005 


Local Auction Permit Agent 




Geographical Information System 




Evelyn Clarke 


2005 


Robert Kennedy, Jr. 


2005 






Sandra H. Frigon 


2005 


Local Water Resource Management 




Gary A. Lehmann 


2005 


Official 




Raymond P. Moore 


2005 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2005 


Marie Zack Nolan 


2005 






Michael Perloff 


2005 


Medfield MBTA Advisory Board 




Michael J. Sullivan 


2005 


Designee 




Kristine M. Trierweiler 


2005 


Michael J.Sullivan 


2005 


Carol A. Mayer 


2005 


Medfield State Hospital Reuse 




Historical Commission (3 year appt.) 




Committee 




Burgess P. Standley 


2005 


Frank L. Garrison 


2005 


David F. Temple 


2005 


Paul B. Rhuda 


2005 


Daniel Bibel 


2006 


Burgess P. Standley 


2005 


Jonathan Gray 


2006 


Martha L. Smick 


2005 


Charles Navratil 


2006 


Leo J. Surette 


2005 


Maria C. Baler 


2007 


Ann B. Thompson 


2005 


Ancelin Wolfe 


2007 


John T. Harney 


2005 


Richard P. DeSorgher, Assoc (1 Yr) 


2005 


Philip J. Burr 


2005 


Deborah Gaines, Associate 


2005 


Thomas Sweeney 


2005 


David R. Sharff, Associate 


2005 






Michael R. Taylor, Associate 


2005 


Metropolitan Area Planning Counci 


I 


John A. Thompson, Associate 


2005 


Paul Rhuda (February) 


2006 


Electa Kane Tritsch, Associate 


2005 






Jacqueline Wile, Associate 


2005 


Memorial Day Committee 




Clara B. Doub, Associate 


2005 


Michael Short 


2005 


Patricia Iafolla Walsh, Associate 


2005 


Donna Dragotakes 


2005 






Richard D. Hurley 


2005 


Historic District Commission (3 Year) 


William A. Kingsbury 


2005 


Connie Sweeney 


2005 


Jane M. Lomax 


2005 


David R. Sharff 


2005 


Albert J. Manganello 


2005 


Burgess P. Standley 


2006 


William H. Mann 


2005 


Michael Taylor 


2007 


Frederick Miller, Jr. 


2005 


Barbara Jacobs 


2007 


Ann B. Thompson 


2005 






Michelle Doucette 


2005 


Insurance Advisory Committee 




G. Marshall Chick 


2005 


W. Grant Chambers 


2005 


Evelyn Clarke 


2005 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2005 






Joseph B. McWilliams 


2005 


Committee to Study Memorials 








Richard P. DeSorgher 


2005 


Kingsbury Pond Committee 




G. Marshall Chick 


2005 


Michael Cronin 


2005 


Jane M. Lomax 


2005 


Armand Janjigian 


2005 


David F. Temple 


2005 


Paul Simpson 


2005 


Francis Iafolla 


2005 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2005 






John Pratt 


2005 


■ 


■ 



13 



Municipal Census Supervisor 




Geoffrey Tritsch 


2005 


Carol A. Mayer 


2005 


Ron Gustafson 


2005 






Robert Luttman 


2005 


Municipal Planning and Building 








Committee 




Three Rivers Interlocal Council (MAPC) 


Bruce O. Tobiasson 


2005 


Kristine Trierweiler 


2005 


Drew C. Adams 


2005 


Adult Community Center Study 
Committee 




Representatives to Neponset 




Louis Fellini 


2005 


Watershed Initiative Committee 




Robert Luttman 


2005 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2005 


Vincent Lavallee 


2005 






Elizabeth Dorisca 


2005 


Open Space Planning Committee 




Carl Mellea 


2005 


Jonathan Bennett 


2005 






Christine M. Hajjar 


2005 


Elderly Taxation Aid Committee 




Eric W. O'Brien 


2005 


Georgia Colivas 


2005 


Martha L. Smick 


2005 


Clara Doub 


2005 


Caroline D. Standley 


2005 


Nan Rogers 


2005 


Marie Zack Nolan 


2005 


Michael Sullivan 


2005 


Parking Clerk and Hearing Officer 




Downtown Study Committee 




Carol A. Mayer 


2005 


Robert Dugan 


2005 






Brandi Erb 


2005 


Right-To-Know Coordinator 




Eric O'Brien 


2005 


William A. Kingsbury 


2005 


Robert MacLeod 


2005 


- 




Nancy Kelly Lavin 


2003 


Radio Tower Study Committee 




Frank Perry, Alternate 


2005 


David P. Maxson 


2005 






Willis H. Peligian 


2005 


Cable TV Contract Negotiating Con 


imittee 


Paul B. Rhuda 


2005 


Clara B. Doub 


2005 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2005 


Raymond Moore 


2005 






Oliver Brooks, resigned 


2005 


Safety Committee 




Willis Peligian, resigned 


2005 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2005 


Jack McNicholas 


2005 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2005 


Alfred Brisard 


2005 






Rich Boucher 


2005 


Solid Waste Study Committee 








Kenneth P. Feeney 


2005 


Appointed bv the Board of Assessor; 




Kristine Trierweiler 


2005 


Stanley E. Bergeron 


2005 


Ann B. Thompson 


2005 






Cynthia Greene 


2005 






Sandra Frigon 


2005 


Appointed bv the Treasurer/Collector 


LeBaron Colt 


2005 


Clara DeVasto 


2005 






Meline Karapetian 


2005 


Technology Study Committee 




Diane Adair 


2005 


Richard Boucher 


2005 






Alan Joffe 


2005 


Appointed bv the Chairman of the 




Gary Lehmann 


2005 


Selectmen, Chairman of the School 




Raymond Moore 


2005 


Committee and the Town Moderator 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2005 






Kristine Trierweiler 


2005 







14 



Vocational School Committee 




Personnel Board 




Representative 




Susan Richard 


2005 


Karl D. Lord June 30, 20< 


Rachel Brown 


2005 






Debbie Shuman 


2005 


Appointed bv the Fire Chief 




Rev. Robert Wood, Associate 


2005 


Charles G. Seavey, Deputy 


2005 






Thomas Seeley, Captain 


2005 


Appointed bv the Planning Board 




Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr., Lt 


2005 






Richard M. Rogers, Lt 


2005 


Long Range Planning Committee 




David C. O'Toole, Lt 


2005 


Robert F. Tormey, Jr. 


2005 






Peter J. Fellman 


2005 


Appointed bv the Board of Health 




Margaret H. Gryska 


2005 


William R. Domey, P.E. 


2005 


Burgess P. Standley 


2005 


Mark Oram 


2005 


Keith R. Diggans 


2005 


Nancy Bennotti 


2005 


Sign Advisory Board 




Appointed bv the Moderator 




Alfred J. Bonoldi 


2005 






Jeffrey Hyman 


2005 


Deputy Moderator 




Thomas D. Erb 


2005 


Conrad J. Bletzer 


2005 


Thomas J. Roycroft 


2005 






J. Matthew McCormick 


2006 


Warrant Committee 








Caroline Standley 


2005 






Richard E. Gordet 


2005 






Stephen S. Curran 


2005 






Victoria Schepps 


2006 






Randy Rogers 


2006 






Mark Fisher 


2006 






Stephen Pelosi 


2006 






Mary Wilson 


2007 






James Shannon 


2007 






Anne M.Curtin, resigned 


2005 






Connie Jones, resigned 


2005 






John C. Moon, resigned 


2005 






Joseph R. Parker, resigned 


2006 






Permanent School Building and 








Planning Committee 








David Binder 


2005 






C. Richard McCullough 


2005 






Keith Mozer 


2005 






Timothy J. Bonfatti 


2005 






Susan C. Cotter 


2005 






Appointed bv the Town Moderator, 








Chairman of the Board of Selectmen 


i. and 






Chairman of the Warrant Committee 







15 



MEETING SCHEDULE 



Name 


Day 


Time 


Location 


Annual Town Election 


Last Monday in March 


6:00 AM to 8:00 PM 


Wheelock School 


Annual Town Meeting 


Last Monday in April 


7:30 PM 


High School 


Appeals Board 


Wednesday as needed 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Board of Assessors 


1 st Thursday 


6:00 PM 


Town House 


Board of Health 


1 st and 3 rd Wednesday 


6:30 PM 


Town House 


Cultural Council 


Biannually 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


Conservation 


1 st and 3 rd Thursday 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Historical Commission 


3 rd Wednesday 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


Housing Authority 


2 nd Wednesday 


6:30 PM 


Tilden Village 


Library Trustees 


2 nd Tuesday 


7:30 PM 


Library 


MEMA 


1 st Tuesday 


7:00 PM 


Medfield State 


Park and Recreation 


2 nd and 4 th Tuesday 


7:30 PM 


Pfaff Center 


Planning Board 


Mondays 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


School Committee 


1 st and 3 rd Mon 


7:30 PM 


High School 




Monthly (July- August) 


7:30 PM 


High School 


Selectmen 


Tuesdays 


7:00 PM 


Town House 


Warrant Committee 


Tuesdays (Nov. -May) 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Water and Sewer 


1 st and 3 rd Tuesday 


7:00 PM 


Town House 



16 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2004 



17 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Residents of Medfield: 

The Board reorganized for the ensuing year in March. Mr. Paul B. Rhuda was elected 
Chairman and Mr. Osier L. Peterson was elected clerk. Ms. Ann B. Thompson, who 
was re-elected by the Townspeople, was the third member of the Board. 

State Officials 

There are two new officials for the Town of Medfield that will represent the Town 

next year. Mr. Richard Ross of Wrentham won the 9 th Norfolk District seat for the 

House of Representatives. Representative Ross will represent Precincts 3 and 4 in 

Medfield. Mr. James Timilty of Walpole is now the Bristol and Norfolk District 

Senator. 

Personnel Developments 

The Board of Selectmen announce several retirements from the Town including John 
"Jack" O' Toole, Building Inspector, Edith Fernald in Public Works, and Police 
Officers Kevin Robinson and Richard Bishop. The Board of Selectmen wishes them 
all the happiness in their retirement. 

The Fire Department has hired two new Firefighter/EMT's and has the approval to 
hire two more Firefighter/EMT's early next year. The expansion of the department 
will now provide 24-hour, seven day a week ambulance and fire protection service to 
the Town. The Police Department hired three full time police officers replacing 
vacancies in the department. 

Medfield State Hospital 

The Board of Selectmen continues to work with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
to identify a redevelopment plan for the Medfield State Hospital Campus. At the 
present time the Selectmen and the Commonwealth's Division of Capital Asset 
Management have identified a mix of housing and open space to be located on site that 
includes senior housing, skilled nursing facility, and a mix of family housing that 
includes apartments, condominiums, and single family house lots. Once a 
redevelopment plan is agreed upon the Commonwealth will begin working with the 
Planning Board to propose a zoning change for the site. Any change in zoning for the 
site will require a two thirds vote of the Town Meeting. At this point the Board of 
Selectmen anticipates a special town meeting in the fall of 2005 to address the zoning 
and redevelopment issues on the site. The redevelopment of the former state hospital 
is one of the largest issues to face the town in terms of development and as a Board we 
encourage all residents to attend the meetings regarding this process. 



18 



Capital Projects 

The Department of Public Works completed a relocation of South Street from Curve 
Street to Elm Street that included the installation of granite curbing and sidewalks. 
This project was funded utilizing Chapter 90 State Aid, while the labor was supplied 
by the Public Works Department. 

In October of this year the Permanent School Planning and Building Committee 
hosted a rededication ceremony for the Memorial School. The ceremony included an 
emphasis on the original purpose of the naming of Memorial School which was to 
recognize the sacrifice of the World War II veterans. 

The Town's GIS (geographical information system) program expanded again this year 
to include a mapping system of Vine Lake Cemetery. All existing and future plots at 
the cemetery are being mapped to easier locate historical information existing burial 
plots and provide the most efficient expansion opportunities for the cemetery. 

Other Developments 

The Board of Selectmen is pleased to announce that the Massachusetts Comprehensive 
Assessment System (MCAS) test scores were released placing Medfield students near 
the top in overall statewide rankings. 

As always the Board of Selectmen would like to thank the employees of the Town, the 
residents of Medfield, and the countless volunteers and committee members that 
contribute everyday to the workings of town government and assist the Board of 
Selectmen in doing our job. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Paul B. Rhuda, Chairman 
Osier L. Peterson, Clerk 
Ann B. Thompson 



19 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my 23rd Annual Report for the Public Works Department. 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

The following roads were resurfaced with a stone seal: Plain Street, Homestead Drive, 
Clark Road, Alder Road and Elm Street. 

Final 2" of top was overlaid on Causeway Street. 

Sidewalks overlaid: Homestead Drive, Haven Road, Juniper Lane, Alder Road, South 
Street and North Street. 

The dam at Vine Lake Cemetery has been reconstructed. The westerly abutments on 
the down stream side of the dam have been repaired by the Highway Department. It 
was rebuilt using existing material. NO draw down of Cemetery Pond was needed. 

State Aid Project: 

South Street from Curve Street continuing to Elm Street was relocated. Sidewalks and 

granite curbing was installed along with a strip of loam. 

Total snowfall for the year was 52 inches. 

The Medfield Highway Department trucked 3,854 tons of rubbish to the Millbury 
incinerator. The Town collected $4,958.63 in revenue from local businesses for non- 
recyclable trash taken to the Transfer Station. 

Approximately 30,060 pounds of CRTs were collected at the Special Collection Days 
that were held in April and October. 

The Town held a combined Household Hazardous Waste Day with the Town of 
Dover. Approximately two hundred cars dropped off miscellaneous household waste. 

The mercury collection program is ongoing at the Public Works Department at Town 
Hall. Residents are encouraged to drop off items containing mercury e.g. 
thermometers, thermostats and florescent bulbs. 



Recvcling: 


Glass 


40 tons 




Cans 


20 tons 




Plastic 


20 tons 




Light Metals 


217 tons 



20 



Newsprint/Cardboard 923 tons 
Grass/Leaves/Brush 1400 tons 

Revenue received from deposit cans and bottles: $ 3,034.50 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

The Cemetery Department continued their maintenance program of the cemetery 
grounds. This included pruning of trees, mowing of grass, placing of loam and seed. 
There were repairs needed to the dam and stone bridge. We also cleaned the old 
section and made minor repairs in that section. We are currently working on 
implementing the GIS System for the entire cemetery. This will help us to design an 
esthetically pleasing and efficient layout. 

There were 43 interments and 71 burial plots sold during the year 2004. 

We would like to welcome our new Cemetery Department staff, Tim Mandell and 
Tom Almquist. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

Medfield Water Department installed 31 new services and replaced 3 hydrants. Five 
hundred new meters were installed. 

A total of 534,530,300 gallons of water were pumped in 2004. 

Flushing Program : The Water Department continues to flush the water system twice a 
year in an effort to ensure quality water. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

In 2004 the Wastewater Treatment Plant treated 394,310,410 gallons of sewerage from 
homes and various businesses in town. The State Hospital discharged 8,690,610 
gallons of sewerage and 319,100 gallons of septic from private systems was treated. 
The combined effluent was discharged to the Charles River with a better than 98% 
removal of impurities. One million five hundred and sixty two gallons of sludge was 
shipped to Woonsocket, Rhode Island for incineration. 

The Town took over Dela Park sewer pumping station located off Route 109. This 
makes a total of nine pump stations that are town owned. 

The Wastewater Treatment Plant successfully passed the Department of 
Environmental Protection's inspection. A tour of the plant was held for the the entire 
eighth grade. Due to faulty insulation around an exhaust pipe, a back up generator at 
the Wastewater Treatment Plant caused a small roof fire. The insulation was replaced 
and the generator was placed back on-line. 



21 



Environmental Protection Agency issued the town a new permit for the Wastewater 
Treatment Plant for the period of 2004 to 2009. 

The final paving for Phase ID Sewer Project has been completed. 

There were forty-seven new sewer hook-ups in 2004 

Edie Fernald, the Administrative Assistant of the Highway Department retired after 15 
years of service. I would like to thank her for all her help and above all her patience. 

In conclusion, I wish to express appreciation to Administrative Assistants Claire 
O'Neil of the Highway Department and Mary Luciano and Kathy Berteletti of the 
Water and Sewer Department. Appreciation is also given to Robert Kennedy, Street 
Department Foreman, Edward Hinkley, Water & Sewer Foreman and Peter Iafolla, 
Chief Operator of the Wastewater Treatment Plant as well as all the men of the various 
departments who are to be commended for their continuous, conscientious public 
service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kenneth P. Feeney 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 




22 



Board of Water and Sewerage 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Town continued to respond well to the water conservation signs keeping the 
consumption within the goals of the program. With wells 6 and 3 the Town has 
ample water pumping capacity and wells 1 , 2 and 4 as stand-by. However, State DEP 
is threatening to severely reduce the amount of water that may be pumped from our 
production wells. If fully implemented, these new restrictions would severely impact 
quality of life and cost of living in our town. 

In December State DEP issued a draft copy of restrictions to the State Pumping 
Permit that needs to be renewed every 5 years. Particularly, the pumping levels were 
severely reduced for Well 6, our most important well. It has by far the largest 
capacity and excellent water quality. During several formal meetings with high-level 
DEP representatives our town officials rigorously opposed the articles of the draft 
regulations. Together with our neighboring communities that also draw water from 
the Charles River aquifer we will take all possible action to prevent the new 
regulation in its present form from taking effect. 

Transfer of the hospital well field and adjacent parcel of land is still in limbo. With 
the pending pumping restrictions, additional capacity could be a moot point. 

Work on the Wastewater Treatment Plant has been completed. The effluent now 
meets all present state and federal regulations. However, requirement for 
denitrification is looming, anticipating additional work and expenditures. The 
Enterprise Fund carried the cost of the effort of upgrading the plant and is no longer 
in a surplus mode. For that reason, and because of lower water consumption during 
an unusually wet season water and sewer rates had to be increased after a public 
hearing. 

The state-mandated Storm Water Management Plan has been submitted to DEP. The 
Charles River Watershed Association commented in a letter to DEP that our plan is 
not going far enough to comply with the State-mandated requirements. We disagree 
with the practicality of their comments. 

As part of the effort to recharge the Charles River aquifer the Board was considering 
to re-infiltrate part of the plant's effluent at the Wastewater Treatment Plant. This 
would require pre-treatment to minimize nitrates still remaining in the effluent. 
However, presumably under the influence of the Charles River Watershed 
Association, DEP no longer supports re-infiltration because it would reduce the flow 
of the river. The project is now suspended. 



23 



Repair of the old sewer pipes continues on a yearly basis to further reduce the 
inflow/infiltration of storm water into the sewer system. This reduces the load for our 
Wastewater Treatment Plant. 

The Water & Sewerage Board has essentially concluded the sewer extension program. 
An up-to-date list of the completed sewer lines is available at the Office of the Water 
& Sewerage Board. Abutters of Hatters Hill Road, one of the remaining streets not 
sewered, had petitioned the Board for a low-pressure "force main" system since a 
number of on-site treatment systems are failing. Unfortunately, the cost proposals by 
potential firms that would perform the excavation and laying of the force main sewer 
line came in significantly higher than the original estimate. 

The higher costs were justified by the results of test borings that revealed extensive, 
shallow rock formations close to the street surface. The project had to be shelved for 
reasons of insufficient funds. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marc Tishler, Chairman 

Neil MacKenzie 

Gary Lehmann 

Jeremy Marcette, Associate Member 




24 



PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



In an unusual 2004, the Planning Board did not receive any new subdivision plans 
for review. However, the Board did release 4 lots on the previously approved 
Robinson Road Subdivision, thus, allowing them to be sold. 

The Board endorsed five "approval-not-required" plans, creating five new 
buildable lots and redefining four lot lines. "Approval-not-required M plans are 
those plans necessary to create new lots along existing ways or change lot lines on 
existing lots but not rising to the level of a full subdivision approval process. 

The Board also approved one Site Plan for a duplex dwelling at 49 Spring Street on 
the corner with Kingsbury Drive. 

TOWN MEETING ACTIONS 

The Planning Board placed four articles on the Warrant for 2004, all of which were 
approved by the voters and by the Attorney General for the Commonwealth. These 
articles included: 

• An amendment to Section 13 regulating lightening of signs 

• A second amendment to Section 13 governing "Open" flags 

• Revision of Section 14.13 requiring Site Plan Review by the Planning Board 
for construction or expansion in excess of 500 square feet of any building other 
than a single-family residence 

• Designation of the following streets as scenic roads under the provisions of 
M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 15C: 

o Hartford Street in its entirety 

o North Street from Harding Street to the Dover town line 

o Philip Street in its entirety 

o School Street in its entirety 

SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 

Under Section 13 of the Town of Medfield Zoning Bylaw the Sign Advisory Board 
reviews sign applications for their compliance with the Bylaw . The Board also 
assists applicants in understanding the Sign Bylaw and works with them to obtain 
results in keeping with the character of the Town. In addition Sign Advisory 
Board members make recommendations to the Planning Board for changes in the 
Bylaw . The Board is comprised of both local business people and residents. 



25 



OTHER BUSINESS 

Board members served on the Trails Study Committee and Capital Budget 
Committee. 

The Board continued to use the engineering services of Earth Tech, Inc. for 
subdivision review and street construction inspections. 

The Planning Board acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and assistance of 
the Town Boards and Departments with special thanks to Town Counsel Mark G. 
Cerel; Superintendent of Public Works Kenneth P. Feeney; and Tree Warden 
Edward Hinkley. 

Planning Board meetings are generally held on Monday evenings at 7:30 P.M. at 
the Town House. These meetings are open to the public. Appointments with the 
Board must be made by the Thursday noon prior to the meeting. Requests for 
information or appointments should be directed to the Planning Board 
Administrator, Norma Cronin, at the Town House, 508-359-8505, ext. 645. 



Respectfully submitted, 

George N. Lester, Chairman 
Stephen J. Browne, Vice-Chairman 
Timothy P. Sullivan,' Secretary 
Elissa G. Franco, Member 
Wright C. Dickinson, Member 



26 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 2004 the Board of Appeals acted on thirty- five applications as follows: 

GRANTED: One Special Permit for a food establishment and parking 

Twenty-two findings that proposed additions will not intensify the 

existing nonconformity 

Two findings that the proposed demolition of homes and construction 

of new homes on the same site would not intensify the existing 

nonconformity 

Two Special Permits to allow family apartments 

One extension of an existing Special Permit to build a home 

One determination that specific and material changes have occurred 

One amendment to a Comprehensive Permit for additional parking 

One Special Permit for work in the Aquifer Protection District to 

build a new home 

DENIED: One Variance from front yard setback 

One Special Permit for a food establishment 

One application was withdrawn without prejudice. 

One appeal of the decision of the Building Inspector to issue a building permit was 
remanded to the Building Inspector with conditions. 

The Board of Appeals would like to express its sincere thanks to retiring Building 
Inspector/Zoning Enforcement Officer John P. O' Toole for his many years of 
dedicated service to the Town and especially this Board. 

The Board would also like to express its sincere thanks for all the support and 
consideration it has received this past year from the Town Boards and the residents 
of the Town of Medfield. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Robert F. Sylvia, Chairman 
Stephen M. Nolan, Member 
Russell J. Hallisey, Member 
Charles H. Peck, Associate 
Thomas M. Reis, Associate 
Burgess P. Standley, Clerk 



27 



Board of Assessors 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In December of 2004 proposed values for our first State mandated interim assessment 
were certified by the Massachusetts Department of Revenue, and the Fiscal Year 2005 
tax rate was approved at $12.92/$ 1,000 of assessed value. The town levy commitment 
of $27,584,721 for Fiscal 2005 Town Meeting was a 7.9% increase over the 2004 
commitment of $25,551,583. In late December 2004, tax bills were mailed in a timely 
manner for third quarter payments. Increases in assessed values of single family 
homes averaged 5.5% and condominiums averaged 8.75% over the prior year's 
assessments. Total valuations for the town in Fiscal 2005 rose to $2,135,040,345 
from $2,013,521,169 in Fiscal 2004. 

During Calendar Year 2004 the assessors contracted with Patriot Systems, Inc. for 
conversion of our existing MCS software system to a more updated 
assessment/valuation system. The conversion should take over a year and result in a 
more efficient system which will enable the assessors office to comply with new 
requirements implemented by the Department of Revenue. The conversion effort will 
be a lead by Town Appraiser, Stan Bergeron and Donna M. O'Neill. 

In May of 2004 Edward Beard was elected to his first three-year term on the Board of 
Assessors. 

The Board would like to extend our thanks to C.B. Doub who left the Board this year 
after serving the Board of Assessors and town's people for over 20 years. C.B. began 
in 1978 in an administrative position which was later upgraded to Assistant Assessor. 
In 1988, C.B. became the Office Manager of the Assessors Office in the Town of 
Braintree until her retirement in 1993. She was then elected to the Board of Assessors 
in Medfield and served until her retirement in 2004. C.B. had been awarded the 
MAAO Designation and had completed all assessing courses. Her attention to detail 
and fair handed way of approaching complex problems has helped direct the assessing 
office through some difficult economic times. Her leadership as chairman of the 
board will be missed as the department begins the conversion into the new appraisal 
system. 

We welcomed Kathy Mills of Medfield to our department in November of 2004. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Bruce Beardsley, Chairman 
Francis J. Perry, III, Clerk 
Edward Beard, Third Member 



28 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit the annual report for the Medfield Police Department for the year 
ending December 31, 2004. 

Kevin W. Robinson retired April 24, 2004 after 30 years of service to the Town of 
Medfield. Kevin was sometimes affectionately called, the Mayor of Medfield. 
Officer Robinson served the town with honor, respect and integrity. Thank you 
Kevin. 

Richard D. Bishop retired August 29, 2004 after 33 years of service. Richard served 
as the town prosecutor for many years. Officer Bishop came from a family of Police 
Officers, all of who gave over thirty years of service to their communities. We wish 
Dennis good luck in his retirement. 

Albert Manganello was appointed to full time Police Officer on May 17, 2004. Al had 
previously attended the Police Academy allowing for his immediate use in the 
department. Andrew Clark was appointed to full time Police Officer status on May 
18, 2004 and will attend the Plymouth Police Academy. Christine DiNatale was 
appointed to full time status on May 20, 2004 and will attend the Weymouth Police 
Academy. We welcome them on board and wish them a long and successful career. 

On December 17, 2004, Andrew Clark graduated from the Plymouth Police Academy 
and is now serving his community. 

Officers Daniel Burgess and Lorna Fabbo were promoted to Sergeant on May 9, 2004. 
Both these officers worked hard passing civil service standards and we congratulate 
them. 

The Community Policing grant has not been funded again. This leaves school 
programs out again for the second year. I strongly believe that police/school 
partnership is needed and should be supported. 

The Metropolitan Law Enforcement Council (METLAC), a partnership with the 
Norfolk County Chiefs, allows us to draw from many communities' police officers 
that specialize in various fields of law enforcement. The expertise of this unit has 
expanded into many fields going beyond its original expectations. The unit was 
dispatched to Boston to help with the World Series and the Democratic National 
Convention. METLAC has national acclaim as one of the best. 



29 



Our TRIAD program with seniors experienced another successful year. It is a 
pleasure to meet with this outstanding group of people on a monthly basis. 

In January of 2005 we hope to bring our staffing to 100%. This will be beneficial to 
our community and our service to it. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Richard D. Hurley 
Chief of Police 




30 



This is a summary of the 3,540 calls for service in the 2004 that the Police Department 
handled. 

Aggravated Assault 4 

Annoying calls 166 

Arrests 52 

Arson 

Assists 507 

Bad Checks 7 

Breaking and Entering 14 

Burglar Alarms 545 

Bylaw Violations 15 

Disorderly persons 9 

Disturbances 91 

Drug Violations 8 

Drunkenness 3 

Fire Alarms 156 

Forcible Fondling 1 

Forgery 5 

Homicides 

Juvenile Offenses 3 

Larceny 46 

Liquor Law Violations 1 1 

Malicious destruction 60 

Manslaughter 1 

Medical assists 33 

Miscellaneous calls 176 

Mishchief 139 

Missing Persons 15 

Missing Persons Found 15 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 364 

Motor Vehicle Citations 880 

Operating under the influence 1 1 

Parking Tickets 34 

Protective Custody 7 

Restraint Orders 36 

Runaway 1 

Shoplifting 3 

Swindle 3 

Threats 6 

Trespass 3 

Vandalism 1 1 

Weapons Violations 



31 



MEDFIELD EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit the annual report for the year ending December 31, 2004. 

The Medfield Emergency Management Agency provides coordination between the 
Selectmen, Town Departments, the Massachusetts Emergency Agency and the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency. 

The Medfield Emergency Agency is divided into two sections. One section, the 
Management Group, contains amateur radio operators, a transport section and shelter 
management people. The second section contains the auxiliary police officers. Both 
groups are under the control of the Emergency Management Agency Director, Chief 
of Police. 

The Emergency Management section maintains backup communications systems, 
provides transportation to the shelter and runs shelter operations in case of 
emergencies where people would need temporary shelter due to power outages or 
other such storm damage. The auxiliary police unit provides additional manpower to 
the police department during emergencies and large events such as parades and other 
large public gatherings. As in past years, both groups combined donated over 1,000 
man-hours of community service to the town. 

As noted in last years' report we continue to up-grade our Emergency Operations 
Center now located at Stonegate House on the old Medfield State Hospital grounds. 
These up-grades must be completed so that the Town and this agency can continue to 
be eligible to receive both federal and state grants. This year our major up-grades and 
improvements will be focused on high frequency and digital radio links between the 
Town and both federal and state emergency management agencies. 

I would like to thank the men and women of the department for their continued 
support and contribution throughout the year. Also, I wish to thank the Board of 
Selectmen, Michael Sullivan, his staff and the Medfield Police Department for their 
assistance and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Richard D. Hurley 
Chief of Police 



32 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and the Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

This report reflects my duties as Animal Control Officer and Animal Inspector from 
January 1 through December 31, 2004. 



Total animal control calls 2,789 

Total animal control incidents 898 

(Incidents include removing bats from house, searching for dogs running loose and 
helping people with animal related problems not listed below) 



Called for dogs running loose that were gone arrival 83 

Licensed dogs ninning loose that were returned to their owners 75 

Number of citations issued 155 



Animals hit by cars that were picked up by animal control: 

Cats 1 1 

Dogs 5 

Deer 36 

Raccoons 3 1 

Skunks 24 

Other (rabbits, woodchucks, opossums, etc) 33 



Sick or injured wildlife that had to be euthanized by Animal Control or the 
Veterinarian: 

Raccoons 1 1 

Deer 6 

Other (skunks, bats, opossums, squirrels, birds) 22 



Total calls related to bats, in homes or human and pet exposures 25 

There was ONE confirmed rabid skunk and ONE confirmed rabid raccoon 
in Medfield this year 



33 



Total calls for squirrels inside resident homes 22 

Total number of dead birds picked up by Animal Control for testing 25 
Most dead birds were not tested for West Nile Virus for various reasons 

Total number of barking dog complaints 27 

Dog bites were down from 19 bites last year to 12 dog bites this year and three cat 
bites, each requiring a 10-day quarantine. 



All barns and livestock have been inspected and pass the requirements of the Town of 
Medfield and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. All of the animals and barns are 
in the best of condition. 

The following animals were counted in Medfield in 2003: 



Beef Cows 3 

Donkeys 4 

Llamas 3 

Goats 4 

Horses . 107 

Ponies 4 

Mini-horses 2 

Sheep 30 

Poutry 69 



I appreciate the continuing support and cooperation of the Town of Medfield, the 
Medfield Police Department, Heritage Hill Veterinary Clinic, Main Street Veterinary 
Hospital in Millis, and the Medfield Veterinary Clinic. Thank you to current Assistant 
Animal Control Officers, Danielle Landry and Lori Salle for doing such a great job 
covering the weekends. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Jennifer Shaw Gates 
Animal Control Officer 
Animal Inspector 



34 



MEDFIELD 
FIRE -RESCUE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Chief of the Fire Department for the year ending 
December 31, 2004. 

Fire Department 

The request for services from the department continued to be many and varied with 
over a thousand responses to Fire & EMS calls. We started the year out assisting the 
Millis Fire Dept. at a structure fire. This was a difficult fire to fight due to the below 
freezing temperatures. Due to the colder than normal winter we responded to 
numerous requests for carbon monoxide investigations, assistance with frozen pipes 
and water problems. In May we conducted a search in the Charles River for a car that 
was reportedly driven into it. The vehicle was located, and we assisted in its recovery. 
In June we responded to a structure fire that resulted in major damage to the house. It 
was eventually razed and has since been rebuilt. In August and again in September we 
assisted Millis Fire Dept with the search of an autistic person that was missing. We 
responded with personnel, boats and our all-terrain vehicle to aid in the search. Both 
times the person was able to be located. This year we have responded to many motor 
vehicle accidents. Some of these resulted in a loss of life as well as life altering 
injuries. In all of these incidents the victims were treated with the utmost professional 
care and compassion. 

This year the roof over the apparatus bays was replaced. We are in desperate need of 
more space and an up-to-date facility. The present Fire Dept. facility was built in 1960 
and has undergone a few superficial up-dates since. Our daily operations have changed 
as well as the size and amount of equipment we now have. These space issues are a 
safety issue as well. This has been documented by the previous Municipal Building 
Study Committee and I believe we need to move forward with a plan to remedy the 
problem. In FY 06 I will be seeking funds to replace Engine 1 a 1977 Pumper. This 
engine will be twenty-nine years old and needs to be replaced. The remainder of our 
equipment is in good shape. 

Training has continued throughout the year. All aspects of firefighting and rescue 
techniques have been worked on and reviewed. 

Fire prevention inspections have been conducted throughout the year. The school 
construction projects have kept us busy. We have routinely made inspections and have 
been monitoring their progress. We will be closely monitoring the proposed use for 
the Medfield State Hospital property and how its future use will impact the 
department. 



35 



Ambulance 

The Ambulance responded to over five hundred and seventy calls for assistance this 
year. We responded to the aid of neighboring communities forty times while receiving 
aid thirty times due to multiple runs. 

This year the Fire-Rescue budget was increased to support the hiring of four additional 
full-time Firefighter/EMT's starting January 1, 2005. This will enable us to have 
fulltime coverage 24hrs a day 7 days a week. On December 31 st the last on-call 
ambulance shift was filled. This brought to close a long period of dedicated service of 
many individuals who have served as an on-call EMT's over the years. We are 
extremely grateful for all the time and effort that they contributed in an effort to make 
our town a better and safer place to live. 

I would like to thank all the men and women of the department who serve as 
Firefighters and Firefighter/EMT's. I look forward to their continued commitment in 
serving our community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Kingsbury 
Fire Chief 



36 



SERVICES RENDERED FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 2004 



AMBULANCE 
Total Calls 576 



Transports To: 


Metrowest Natick 


160 


Caritas Norwood 


200 




Metrowest Framingham 


3 


Newton Wellesley 


17 




Deaconess Glover 


20 


Mass General 







Brigham and Women's 


3 


Children's Hospital 







Other: V/A 


3 


Beth Israel 


1 



Advanced Life Support 

Departmental ALS : 131 



Hospital ALS: 199 



Other Services Medflight 5 Standby 20 Cancelled/Refusals 101 

Mutual Aid 71 Rendered 41 Received 30 

Details 15 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 










Alarms 










Box 




167 






False 




40 






Still 




845 






Residential 




52 






Services 










Ambulance Assist 


138 




Haz-mat 


46 


Appliances 


12 




Investigations 


80 


Brush and Grass 


20 




Motor Vehicles 


2 


Burners Oil 


8 




Motor Vehicle Accidents 


82 


Gas 


6 




Mutual Aid Rendered 


13 


Carbon Monoxide Alarms 


22 




Received 


11 


Details 


18 




Police Assist 


12 


Dumpsters 


2 









37 



Services (continued) 








Electrical 


20 


Responses to MSH 


25 


Fuel Spills 


6 


Station Coverage 


8 


Gas Leaks/Investigations 


32 


Structures 


20 


Med-Flight 


5 


Storm Related 


12 


Fireworks 


1 


Searches 


5 


Public Assistance 




Permits Issued 




Lock Outs 


20 


Blasting 


2 


Pumping Cellars 


3 


Bonfire 





Water Problems 


16 


Burning 


509 


Other 


68 


Fuel Storage 


26 






Sprinkler Inst/ Alt 


12 


Inspections 




Propane Storage 


24 


Blasting 


25 


U/Tank Removal 


3 


Fire Prevention 


20 


Fire Alarm Inst. 


4 


Fuel Storage 


15 


Tank Truck 


10 


New Residential 


23 


Welding 


2 


Smoke Detectors New 


23 






Resale 


176 






Oil Burners 


34 






Wood Stoves 


4 






U/Tank Removal 


4 






AST/Removal 


11 







38 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending December 31, 2004: 



Department 


Permits 


Inspections 


Income 


Expenses 




2003 


2004 


2003 


2004 


2003 


2004 


2003 


2004 


Building 


394 


446 


1,064 


1,968 


$184,050 


$275,629 


$32,287 


$46,860 


Plumbing/Gas 


387 


400 


400 


444 


13,886 


15,700 


14,676 


11,104 


Wiring 


373 


405 


527 


647 


27,052 


27,255 


14,520 


17,482 



Total revenues from the issuance of permits and fees for inspections for the calendar 
year 2004 were $318,584 as compared to $210,566 in 2003. Expenses for 2004 were 
$75,446 as compared to $52,984 in 2003. 



BUILDING INSPECTION 

A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 

New single family dwellings 48 

Multi Family (Condo's) 

Complete partially finished single dwellings 

Additions to private dwellings 98 

Renovations to private dwellings 109 

Additions & renovations to business/industrial buildings 1 

New industrial/business buildings 

Family Apartments 

2 Family Apartments 

Shingling roof & installation of sidewalls 64 

Private swimming pools 9 

Accessory buildings 5 

Residential garages 3 

Demolition's 25 

Tents (temporary) & Construction trailers 3 

Signs 16 

Stoves (solid fuel burning/chimneys) 5 

TOTAL 378 



39 



Occupancy certificates were issued for 25 new residences in 2004, as compared to 16 
in 2003. 

Inspections for certification of business, schools, multi-family dwellings, nursing 
homes and pre-schools amounted to 23 inspections for 2004. 

Estimated construction costs on permits issued: 



2003 



2002 



New Dwellings 

Renovations and additions, pools, shingling, sidewalls, etc. 

on residential 
New Construction business and industry 

Renovations and additions business and industry 
Multi-family dwellings 
Two family dwellings 
Family Apartments 



$9,057,000 
6,773,035 


$7,186,000 
8,675,882 


649,250 


181,000 


3,957,000 





43,087,500 






Whether you are planning to add a pool, a deck, reshingle, apply siding or install 
replacement windows, most changes to your home require a building permit. These 
comprehensive building laws may seem cumbersome, but they are meant to benefit us 
all by monitoring the building and development activities in our community. Please, 
also remember that the placement of any type of structure, as simple as a tool shed 
(accessory building) on your property must adhere to the rules and regulations of the 
Medfield Zoning Bylaws, and in most cases a building permit is required. Before you 
proceed with any changes to your home or property, please call the Inspection 
Department at the Town Hall (359-8505, ext. 603) and we will help you get started in 
the process of applying for a permit. 

Enforcement of the State Building Code (780 CMR - 6th Edition) continues to be the 
responsibility of the local building inspectors. Legislation effective 7/1/92 requiring 
contractors to be registered with the Commonwealth became the responsibility of the 
Inspection Department staff to institute procedural changes for compliance. The office 
of the Inspection Department also keeps an accurate registration of builders holding 
State Construction Supervisor's licenses in order to assure compliance with Section 
109.1.1 of the State Building Code. The building inspectors continue the enforcement 
to the code by making inspections of schools, churches and rest homes as well as other 
places of assembly on a periodic basis. 

The Inspectors of Buildings also serve the Town in the capacity of Enforcing Officers 
for Zoning and as such, made 1 1 1 inspections to investigate complaints and inquiries 
brought to their attention by residents as well as other town boards and departments. 

The assistance and cooperation of Fire Chief Kingsbury during inspections was greatly 
appreciated. The Fire Chief and the Inspectors continue to inspect smoke detectors in 



40 



new construction and in additions and renovations as well as inspecting the installation 
of solid fuel burning appliances. Residents are reminded of the importance of having 
their wood stove installations inspected and certified in accordance with requirements 
of the Massachusetts State Building Code. 

We regretfully accepted the resignation fo John "Jack" O' Toole. Jack has been with 
the Building Department for 26 years. His dedication and expertise will be missed. 

Welcome to Walter Tortorici our new Building Inspector. 

Thank you to Pat Iafolla- Walsh, Administrative Secretary and Christopher Cronin, 
John Foster, and James Landry, Assistant Building Inspectors. A special thanks again 
this year to Margaret Warren for her continued help in this office. 

PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 

The purpose of the position of the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is to administer, 
investigate and enforce the Uniform State Plumbing Code and State Fuel Gas Code. 
Homeowners cannot be issued plumbing or gas permits. Permits can only be issued to 
a licensed Journeyman or a Master Plumber. Plumbing or gas cannot be installed, 
altered, removed, replaced, or repaired until the Inspector of Plumbing or Gas has 
issued a permit. The Inspection Department will be glad to help you make the 
determination concerning the need for plumbing and gas permits. When a citizen of 
the town requests the plumber or gas fitter to apply for a permit, he is getting the 
assurance that the installation will not only be installed correctly and safely, but also 
that the work will be installed by a professional and not exploited by non 
professionals. It is definitely in the homeowner's interest to insist on inspections by 
qualified town inspectors knowledgeable in their trade. It is money well spent. 

The Plumbing Code is constantly being changed and upgraded to try to give the 
consumer and the plumber a direction that will assure a safe installation. Of great 
concern lately is the installation of backflow prevention devices, where necessary, to 
insure the continuance of the good clean potable water of which we are very proud in 
Medfield. 

The assistance of John Fratolillo was greatly appreciated again this year. 

WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the Massachusetts Electric Code as well as 
the National Electric Code in his inspections of wiring installations for which permits 
are issued. Residents are reminded that the permitting process is in effect to assure 
safe and correct installations. 



41 



Thank you this year to Joseph Wallace, Joseph Erskine, and William McCarthy 
Assistant Electrical Inspectors. 



Respectfully submitted, 



John P. O' Toole, Inspector of Buildings 
James Leonard, Inspector of Wires 
John A. Rose Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 




42 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

The following is the Annual Report for the Sealer of Weights and Measures for the 
calendar year ending December 31, 2004. 

Measuring devices tested and sealed as required by Massachusetts law: 

Weighing scales and balances 39 

Weights 22 

Liquid measuring meters (In gasoline pumps) 71 

Linear measures (Yardsticks and tape measures) 4 

Automated checkout (scanner) systems 3 

Forty-five packaged grocery items were tested for correct weight and inspected for 
required markings. 

Revenue received was $3,649.50. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Michael J. Clancy 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 



43 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

The Conservation Commission administers the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act, 
M.G.L. Chapter 131, Section 40, the Department of Environmental Protection's 
Stormwater Management Policy and the Medfield Wetlands Bylaw, Article DC. These 
laws protect the wetlands and waterways of Medfield. The functions of these laws are to 
safeguard public surface and groundwater supplies and to prevent damage from flooding 
by preserving the following resource areas: floodplains, swamps and bogs, streams, 
ponds and other water bodies, and certain types of land adjoining them. Under the 
Medfield Wetlands Bylaw, vernal pools and a 50-foot no-disturb buffer area are protected 
resource areas. Anyone proposing to alter a wetland or land subject to flooding, or to 
perform work within 100 feet of a wetland or bank, or within 200 feet of a river or 
perennial stream must file for a permit with the Conservation Commission. Anyone 
wishing to work within these protected areas must satisfy the Commission that the 
proposed work would not significantly harm the resources. 

The Town benefits from the Wetlands Protection laws and their associated regulations as 
they protect Medfield' s wetlands from pollution, nutrient overloading and encroachment 
and provide guidance and consistency to applicants with regards to the Commission's 
rules and regulations for various construction projects. The Commission's preeminent 
concern is to ensure that the eight interests of the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act 
and the Medfield Wetlands Bylaw are upheld. The eight important public interests or 
values are: protection of public and private water supply, protection of groundwater 
supply, flood control, storm damage prevention, prevention of pollution, protection of 
land containing shellfish, protection of fisheries and protection of wildlife habitat, as they 
relate to the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the Medfield Wetlands Bylaw. 

In 2004, the Commission held 21 public meetings for the purpose of: 15 Requests for 
Determinations of Applicability, 18 Notices of Intent, 15 continued hearings for Notices 
of Intent and 6 violations. The Commission issued the following formal decisions: 15 
Negative Determinations of Applicability, 16 Orders of Conditions, 13 Certificates of 
Compliance, and 5 Extensions. 

In addition to the regulatory responsibilities of wetlands protection, the Commission is 
charged by the Conservation Commission Act to actively protect the watershed resources 
of the town and to promote and develop natural resources of the town. The Commission 
actively pursues the acquisition of land for conservation and passive recreation use. The 
Commission provides support to the Open Space Committee in its efforts to identify and 
acquire parcels of open land for the Town, and coordinates with the Planning Board in its 
consideration of subdivisions with significant wetlands implications. 



44 



In keeping with the agricultural intent for the Holmquist Farm Conservation Land on 
Plain Street, the Medfield Community Gardens are permanent users of the land. The 
Commission continues its association with the Thunder Hill 4-H Club sheep project. Two 
structures were erected on the site: a sheep barn and a llama shed. A visit to the 
Holmquist Farm Conservation Land on Plain Street will provide citizens with a scenic 
view of the sheep and llamas grazing in the pastures on one side and fields of vegetables 
on the other. Both of these activities are consistent with the intended agricultural purpose 
for the property. 

Regrettably, I. Lorah Igo resigned from the Commission. She has retired to Virginia. On 
behalf of the town, the Commission thanks Lorah for her organizational skills and 
professional talents that she shared with the town during her tenure on the Commission. 
The Commission welcomes Marie Zack Nolan as its newest member. Marie comes to the 
Commission with experience in town government and environmental protection. 

The Conservation Commission meets on the first and third Thursdays of the month. The 
Conservation Office is located on the second floor of Town Hall, Room 209 and is open 
on Wednesdays and Thursdays during normal business hours. As site inspections for 
projects are generally completed on Wednesdays and Thursdays during the morning, 
always call the office, 508 359-8505, ext. 646, for an appointment. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph A. Parmigiane, Chairman 
Michael Perloff, Vice-Chairman 
Deborah J. Bero 
Philip J. Bun- 
Robert T. Kennedy 
Bruce Redfield 
Marie Zack Nolan 

Associate Members: 
Betty A. Kaerwer 
Caroline D. Standley 



45 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Historical Commission is appointed by the Board of Selectmen. Our 
job is to identify and protect Medfield' s historical and archaeological assets. We 
make sure historic preservation is considered in community planning and development 
decisions. The commission has an annual budget of some $2,500, and it has certain 
statutory authority. Its monthly meetings in the town hall are open to the public. 

We are proud of the work we do for Medfield and feel we deliver a lot of bang for the 
buck. Along with many other groups, we work proactively to preserve those qualities 
of the town that residents say they want, which helps preserve property values. We 
commend the local history programs in the schools that help younger people learn to 
respect this old town. 

(The Medfield Historical Society, with which the commission is often confused, is a 
private, not-for-profit organization of history enthusiasts.) 

Demolition Delay Bylaw 

Medfield is one of relatively few Massachusetts communities with a demolition delay 
bylaw. It prevents historically significant buildings - non-renewable resources ~ from 
being demolished before serious efforts have been made to rehabilitate or restore 
them. The bylaw URL is http://www.town.medfield.net/Bvlaws.pdf 

Working in cooperation with the building inspector, the commission looks at every 
application to demolish a building over 50 years old. It investigates and holds 
hearings on those that may be historically significant. If a building is then classed 
"preferably preserved," its demolition may delayed up to a year. The commission 
always seeks to expedite win-win solutions - such as rehab and adaptive reuse of at 
least part of the building « that serve the interests of both the property owner and 
historic preservation. We define lose-lose as when the owner refuses to negotiate and 
instead simply waits us out for the full year and then demolishes the structure. 

In October, 2004, the commission met with John Rodman, long-time chair of the 
Newton Historical Commission, to learn about Newton's creative win- win approaches 
to historic preservation. 

National Register of Historic Places 

Some time in 2005, Vine Lake Cemetery will be formally added to the National 
Register of Historic Places. Its nomination won unanimous approval from the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission in November, 2004, and the nomination was 
sent to the National Park Service. Six other Medfield sites are already in the National 



46 



Register: the First Baptist Church (2003), the D wight-Derby House and the Inness 
Studio (both 2002), Medfield State Hospital (1994), the Peak House (1975), and First 
Parish Unitarian-Universalist Church (1974). 

Listing in the National Register of Historic Places provides recognition of the historic 
significance of a building or site. Under certain circumstances it may help the owner 
secure grants or tax relief for preservation or restoration work. 

Historic Preservation Awards 

Historic Preservation Awards are given to people who give meritorious service for the 
preservation of Medfield' s history. Often they are given to homeowners who have 
restored significant houses. 

In 2004 the commission presented the award to Scott and Diane Davenport of 54 
Pleasant Street. Their house is an early 19 th century cape at the corner of Oak Street. 
They removed a decaying wing on the Oak Street side; the handsome replacement is a 
perfect complement to the main house. They also tore out a small asphalt basketball 
court and replaced it with some beautifully designed gardens. 

Grant for Vine Lake Cemetery Preservation and Management Plan 

In 2004 we hired a landscape architect/preservation consultant to prepare a 
comprehensive plan for preserving and restoring Vine Lake Cemetery, one of 
Medfield's oldest (1651) major historic assets. This 100+ page document is available 
for anyone to read at the public library and the historical society. The book provides 
much historical information about the cemetery. It contains an assessment of the 
landscape and grave stones, and a structural engineer's assessment of walls, roads, 
bridges, and public tombs. 

It also has recommendations for prioritizing the work and estimates of associated 
costs. The most expensive part of the job involves gravestones, both restoring broken 
colonial-era gravestones and finding and restoring grave markers for some 500 
Medfield State Hospital patients. If everything on the wish list were done, the cost 
would approach seven figures - but the commission plans to seek grants from multiple 
sources and spread the work over many years. 

Thanks to its CLG (Certified Local Government) status, Medfield has received many 
survey and planning grants from the state and federal governments in recent years. 
The Massachusetts Historical Commission continues to encourage us to apply because 
they believe we put the money to good use. 

In 2003 we received a survey and planning grant to prepare the Vine Lake Cemetery. 
The Town ended up paying 40% of the $16,000 planning cost; the state paid 60%. For 
future work, we plan to seek a Massachusetts Preservation Projects Fund (MPPF) 
grant, which would reimburse us for 50% of the cost of restoration work. We are also 



47 



looking into the Community Preservation Act as another possible way to minimize the 
cost of preserving and maintaining Vine Lake Cemetery. 

For our survey and planning work, our demolition delay activism, MAAC, and other 
activities, the Massachusetts Historical Commission has long pointed to Medfield as a 
model for other historical commissions. 

Want a Date Sign for Your House? 

Many residents ask how to get a date sign for their house. The procedure is simple: 

1. Submit your request in the form of a brief note to the Medfield Historical 
Commission. Attach copies of documentation (such as property records from the 
Registry of Deeds in Dedham) showing when the house was built and the name of 
the original owner. 

2. If it believes the information is accurate, the historical commission will approve 
your request. 

3. Take the letter to Abell Sign, 37 Janes Avenue. The homeowner pays for the sign. 

Medfield Archaeological Advisory Committee (MAAC) 

The Medfield Archaeology Advisory Committee was formed in 1993 as a 
subcommittee of the Medfield Historical Commission. It was formed to help protect 
archaeologically-sensitive areas in town. MAAC members are John A. Thompson, 
Chairman; Electa Tritsch; Debbie Gaines; C. B. Doub; Jackie Wile; Barbara Leighton; 
Bill Knowles, and Burgess P. Standley. 

On an ongoing basis, the committee maintains and updates a map of the 
archaeologically-sensitive areas, helps protect the sites, evaluates and registers 
artifacts, and provides educational services. Since 1997, MAAC has conducted 
archaeological field activities on town property supervised by a volunteer professional 
archaeologist. 

In 2004 MAAC worked with the Morse family to help with the archaeological dig at 
the Morse cellar hole, a landlocked site off East Main Street. Samuel Morse built a 
house on the land in 1663, and it was long believed that the house had been burned in 
King Philip's attack in 1676. The dig proved that a house had been on the site and 
had burned, and it also turned up a number of daily living artifacts. The site had been 
essentially undisturbed for over 325 years! 

MAAC welcomes inquiries from anyone who thinks a property in Medfield is 
threatened; please contact John A. Thompson or any other member. 



48 



Want to join our commission? 

Vacancies occur on the historical commission from time to time. In 2004 Charles 
Navratil joined us, and as a registered architect, he is providing an important 
knowledge base we had previously lacked. If you're interested in Medfield's history, 
call any of the members, or show up at one of our monthly public meetings, and let's 
get to know each other. You could start as an associate member and become a full 
member if someone resigns. 



Respectfully submitted, 



David Temple, Co-chair 
Daniel Bibel, Co-chair 
Maria Baler 
Jonathan Gray 
Charles Navtrail 
Burgess P. Standley 
Ancelin Wolfe 



49 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectman 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Overview 

The Historic District Commission administers the Town's four Historic Districts: 

• The John Metcalf Historic District established in 1989 on West Main Street, 
enlarged in 1996 and in 2004. 

• The Hospital Farm Historic District established in 1994. 

• The Clark-Kingsbury Farm Historic District established in 1997. 

• The Medfield Town Center Historic District established in 2000 

Purpose and Scope of the Historic District Commission 

Authority to create Historic Districts and the accompanying governing body is granted 
under the Historic District Act of 1960, Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40C. 
The purpose of the law is threefold: 

• to preserve and protect the distinctive characteristics of buildings and places 
significant in the history of the Commonwealth and its cities and towns 

• to maintain and improve the settings of those buildings and places 

• to encourage new designs compatible with existing buildings in the district 

Under Chapter 40C, communities can create Local Historic Districts to protect the 
character of historic areas. Town-appointed Local Historic Commissions govern such 
districts. Since each property owner within a district contributes to the overall historic 
character, changes proposed for the exterior of any property, as well as new 
construction, are considered in light of the impact they may have on the district as a 
whole. Before a property owner within a district is allowed to change an exterior 
architectural feature of a building, the owner must receive approval from the Local 
Historic Commission. Approval is in the form of a certificate of appropriateness, 
hardship or non-applicability with respect to such construction or alteration. 

There are now Local Historic Districts in over one hundred Massachusetts towns and 
cities. Historic Districts do not prevent changes from occurring, nor do they prevent 
new construction. The intent of any Local Historic District is not to halt growth, but to 
allow for thoughtful consideration of change, to allow changes and additions that are 
harmonious, and prevent the intrusion of incongruous elements that might distract 
from the aesthetic and historic values of the district. Local Historic District 
Commissions have authority only over the portion of the exterior of a building that can 



50 



be seen from a public street, way or park. The Commission's Guidelines for Changes 
within Medfleld Local Historic Districts is available upon request. 

Historic Districts in Medfield 

Medfleld passed "Historic Districts", Article 14 of the bylaws, and created the John 
Metcalf Historic District through a vote of the 1989 annual Town Meeting. This first 
district included for historic houses on west Main Street and included the oldest 
portion of Vine Lake Cemetery. Through a vote of the annual Town Meeting in 1996, 
the John Metcalf Historic District was enlarged to include a total of sixteen historic 
buildings. 

The Town established a second historic district, The Hospital Farm Historic District, 
in 1994. It includes 33 buildings at the Medfield State Hospital, and the surrounding 
historic landscape. The buildings were built at the turn of this century, mostly in the 
Queen Anne Revival style, and are grouped around a large quadrangle, resembling the 
campus of a small college. 

In 1997, the Clark- Kingsbury Farm Historic District, Medfield' s third district, was 
established. It provides protection to the historic and unique grouping of the 18 th 
century Clark-Kingsbury farmhouse, outbuildings and pond with gristmill that forms a 
widely appreciated and essential part of the rural character of Medfield. 

In April of 2000, the Medfield Town Center Historic District was created by 
unanimous vote of Town Meeting. This proposed district is intended to preserve and 
protect the character of the Center of the town of Medfield. 

The Town Center of Medfield is important for its mix of civic, commercial, and 
residential properties. Each category has an integral function in the town and over the 
years as the town has developed, each building, in its own unique way, has been 
significant in the developing character of the Town Center. While the other historic 
districts in Medfield are primarily residential, an unusual aspect of this proposed 
historic district is the concentration of civic and commercial buildings in addition to its 
residential ones. Historically, where the civic buildings provided the center of town 
government, education, religious and social activity, the industrial and commercial 
buildings served as the hub of Medfield's active and developing economy. 

Accomplishments and Plans 

• The Commission is in the process of revising its Guidelines for Changes within 
Medfield Local Historic Districts. It will be more user friendly and address the 
needs of those homeowners with non-historic properties within the four Historic 
Districts in Medfield. These revisions will be presented in a series of Public 
Hearings in the Spring of 2005. 

• The Commission worked with residents of North Street, School Street and Wight 
Street to propose a Historic District that will protect the scenic area in that part of 



51 



town. Although this proposal was not accepted at Town meeting last year, both the 

Commission and a majority of residents are still interested in creating a Historic 

District that will preserve the rural character along North Street. 

The Commission proposed expanding the John Metcalf Historic District to include 

Baxter Park and an adjacent building. This expanded District was approved at 

Town Meeting in 2004. 

The Commission has been actively participating in discussions relevant to the 

changes happening with the State Hospital. 

We are always interested in assisting residents in the creation of new historic 

districts for their neighborhoods and always looking for volunteers to help with our 

efforts. 



Respectfully submitted, 

David Sharff, Chair 
Barbara Jacobs 
Burgess Standley 
Connie Sweeney 
Michael Taylor 



52 



KEEPERS OF THE TOWN CLOCK 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

The Keepers of the Town Clock are pleased to submit their annual report for 2004. 

Frank Sinatra said it best, "It was a good year, a very good year." Aside from setting 
the clock for Daylight Savings Time and Eastern Standard Time, your Town Clock 
had no service interruptions for the entire year except for one power outage in the 
summer. Despite a very onerous winter, the Town Clock was spared the mishaps of 
previous years when ice would freeze the South East clock hands and proceed to strip 
all screws in the second story works. 

Basic maintenance was very light in 2004. Visual inspections of all moving parts 
were performed, but the actual strip down and re-greasing of bushings and bearings 
was not carried out. It was decided to save this work until 2005, as the oils appeared 
clean. 

David Maxson continued to provide Town Clock tours to Medfield' s school children. 

The Keepers of the Town Clock would like to thank the Residents of Medfield and the 
Selectmen for their continued support in the care and maintenance of the Town Clock. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Marc R. Tishler 
David P. Maxson 
Co-Keepers of the Town Clock 



53 



MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



It is my pleasure to submit the 2004 annual report for the Medfield Memorial Public 
Library. This was another busy year with a total circulation of 226,702 items being 
borrowed for fiscal year 2004. Non-resident circulation was 43, 440. 

Approximately 60% of circulation was in adult, young adult and juvenile print 
materials. The audiovisual collections represented approximately 40% of total 
circulation. Audiovisual circulation grew once again as a percentage of total 
circulation. This replicates a national trend to heavier use and growing numbers of 
audiovisual materials in public libraries. Audiovisual materials available to the public 
increased to nearly 10,500 cassettes, compact discs, CD-ROM's, videos, DVD's and 
kits combining books with audiovisuals materials. Library collections overall grew by 
5.7 percent to 72,579. 

The Minuteman Library Network's (which has 41 member libraries including 
Medfield Public) new computer system, Innovative Interfaces, Inc., now allows 
individuals to request the earliest available copy of an item from anywhere in the 
system. This has significantly increased the volume of materials being sent 
throughout the system causing significant problems in most libraries of workflow and 
workload. On the plus side, this has significantly reduced the wait time for most 
materials and is viewed in general very favorably by the public. 

The Library "Bestsellers Club" successfully finished its second year. This 
arrangement provides patrons a way to automatically reserve new adult hardcover 
fiction by over 100 best-selling authors. Multiple copies of titles are purchased so that 
no one has to wait very long to read their favorite authors. The Library also receives 
copies from other libraries in the system so that the wait time is lessened for the 
library patron. 

Circulation staff maintained a welcoming attitude and providing friendly assistance to 
the public while averaging the highest circulation per staff person for communities our 
size in the state of Massachusetts for fiscal year 2003. The average number of items 
circulated by each full-time equivalent staff person was 29,416 for fiscal year 2003. 
This is over 12 % heavier work load than the nearest library. Staff also assisted 
individuals in finding leisure reading materials, materials for research, and with 
general information and aid. 

It was also a busy year for reference staff. Reference Librarians assisted people with 
answers to reference questions, aided in reader's advisory service, offered research 



54 



assistance, and one-to-one instruction on navigating the Internet and in locating 
information in online databases. They also kept the public Internet and catalog 
computers and printers running throughout the year. Working with school librarians 
and teachers to supplement curriculum needs of students was another important 
function for reference staff. 

The Children's Department was, as always, a bustling center of activity that swarmed 
with children throughout the year. Children's Librarians, Ann Russo and Jean 
Todesca, provided numerous programs for toddlers, preschoolers, and school-age 
children. Musical performances, puppet shows, evening PJ storytimes, a summer 
reading program, and programs for parents made for an event-filled year. More than 
2,700 items were added to the various children's collections. 

Under the leadership of Kathy Brennan, Friends of the Library provided ongoing 
support for the library and its programs throughout the year. They again provided 
funding for the children's storytimes and special programs. They also funded the 
purchase of new books, audiovisual materials, and equipment for the library and 
continued their popular program of providing museum passes for the public. Several 
subject areas, such as art books, science fiction, large print, books on compact disc, 
books on cassette, and young adult and children's materials were appreciably 
increased by their generosity. 

The Library Endowment Fund Board of Trustees, under the chairmanship of Diane 
Jurmain, continued its financial assistance to the library. The Library Endowment 
Fund made donations to purchase more materials for the children's book, young adult 
book and books on cassette collections. 

Volunteers were another important component in making a successful year for the 
library. The many individuals who volunteered to work in the library were greatly 
appreciated by both staff and public. Volunteers served in both the circulation and 
children's departments. Numerous individuals assisted in shelving returned materials 
for the circulation department. 



ANNUAL STATISTICS 

New Library Materials 8,957 Total Materials Owned 72,579 

Added 

Circulation of Materials 226,702 Number of Registered Borrowers 9,355 



Respectfully submitted, 

Dan Brassell 
Library Director 



55 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

2004 represented the third year of total circulation in excess of 200,000 items. These 
numbers highlight the continued vibrancy of the library as a central resource and 
meeting place for our community. 

For fiscal year 2003, Medfield ranked first for total circulation per full time employee 
for communities of our size in the Commonwealth. This statistic underscores the 
strong work ethic of our staff under the leadership of Library Director, Dan Brassell. 
In the face of an increasing workload, the library continues its long tradition as a 
welcoming and friendly environment for all patrons. 

At the start of fiscal year 2004, the Minuteman Library Network of 31 libraries 
converted to new software to manage its catalogue and circulation. The upgrade 
introduced new features and services to patrons in Medfield including the ability to 
request the earliest available copy of any book. 

The Trustees wish to recognize the contributions of Dan Brassell and the staff, the 
active sponsorship of programs by the Friends of the Library and continued support of 
the community. In 2005, we look forward to maintaining the high standards of service 
that you have come to expect and to meeting the challenges that changing technology 
pose. 

Respectively Submitted, 

James J. Whalen, Chair 
Patricia Fitzgerald 
Robert Luttman 
Maura McNicholas 
Jane Ready 
Geoffrey Tritsch 



56 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Committee to Study Memorials is pleased to submit its sixteenth Annual Report. 

During the year we have continued to nurture the plantings and seeding of the grass at 
Baxter Memorial Veterans' Park. The Park is a wonderful creation of beauty and an 
everlasting memorial to our Veterans of all wars. A great place in the center of 
Medfield for one to come and sit in solitude, read the memorial bricks in the walkways 
or to reflect and read the names on the monuments. Once again this year bricks were 
offered for sale for the walkways and will be placed the first week in May. Due to a 
poor response this year, we will be discontinuing the sale for a few years. 

On Veterans' Day November 11, 2004, we dedicated three streets to Veterans who 
gave their lives in WWII for the protection of our freedom. These streets are located 
off Dale Street and are named in honor of Thomas Clewes, John Crowder and Joseph 
Pace. 

We wish to thank all residents, the Medfield Highway Department and Medfield Park 
and Recreation Department who made Baxter Park possible. 



Respectfully submitted, 

G. Marshall Chick, Chairman 
Richard DeSorgher 
Frank Iafolla 
Jane M. Lomax 
David F. Temple 



57 



VETERANS' SERVICE OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my fifth annual report as Veterans' Service Officer for the Town of 
Medfield. 

Veterans' Services include helping the Veteran with benefits of hospitalization, 
pension assistance, and information on education, social security and burial 
allowances. This assistance includes fuel, food, clothing, housing and expenses for 
Veterans and their families. Every Veteran should enroll in VA medical services in 
case of an emergency; forms are available at the Town Hall or by calling 508-359- 
8505 ext 632. Also available are applications for Veteran Plates and the Korean War 
Service Medal for service in Korea from June 25, 1950 to July 27, 1953. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts authorizes services and assistance rendered 
Medfield Veterans and their dependents. The Commonwealth reimburses the Town 
seventy- five percent of the benefits extended. 

I wish to thank Town officials and especially Carol Mayer for her assistance and 
helpfulness this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



G. Marshall Chick 
Veterans' Service Officer 



58 



MEMORIAL DAY ADDRESS 2004 

Given by Michael Short 

Commander American Legion Beckwith Post #110 

Welcome Ladies and Gentlemen, Boys and Girls, Fellow Americans - and yes 
welcome to those of you out there that aspire to becoming an American citizen. 

My name is Mike short. I am a Veteran and damn proud of it! 

Care for your veterans, Ladies and Gentlemen. They have cared for you. 

There is little between you and the enemy now. War has changed and your military is 
almost all you have between you and them. 

Memorial Day is the beginning of our American summer and a celebration of our 

Americanism through our country's birthday in July and on to Labor Day in 

September. 

But the true celebration of Memorial Day is to remember those who have died in 

defense of freedom, democracy and liberty in the wars and conflicts that continue even 

today. 

Woodrow Wilson once said: " Liberty has never come from government. Liberty 
comes from the subjects of government." 

These many, many subjects are the men and women of our Armed Forces. The 
conflicts they have died in are names that some are well known, some are not, and 
places they died had strange names in far away places. Is there any doubt in your 
mind today that freedom is not FREE? 

President Kennedy once said it well, "Let every nation know, whether it wishes us 
well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support 
any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and success of liberty." 

Today, tomorrow and for the foreseeable future, Americans are going to have to fight 
once again to defeat those who hate our freedom, our values, our ability to prosper 
throughout the world, and our belief that all individuals should have the opportunity to 
follow their path and to excel beyond their wildest dreams. 

Is America perfect? Certainly not. Does America have problems? Absolutely. The 
difference is we have the freedom, culture and mixture of cultures to learn, change and 
grow. We can individually improve our society through political and civic action. 

Many have asked, "Why do they hate us — why do these militant extremists hate our 
way of life"? I think it is because they fear that their people will get a taste of 



59 



freedom, opportunity, and individuality and yes the power to change, improve, expand 
their knowledge and their lives. . .to live better. 

The extremists fear that they will lose control. I submit that in the computer, 
electronics age of today they have already lost and it is simply a matter of time before 
people in these suppressed nations will seize back their lives. 

This of course may take decades and American soldiers will once again be called upon 
to defend freedom, possibly plant the seeds of freedom and sadly die for that freedom. 

They too will be remembered and revered on Memorial Day as we do today. 



60 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In the calendar year of 2004, the Board of Health membership changed when Vincent 
LaVallee resigned in order to work on the team designing the new senior center. 
Elizabeth Dorisca and Keith Diggans became voting members and Frances Sullivan 
and Gregory Testa became associate members. 

The Board of Health has several challenges not the least of which was the initial flu 
vaccine shortage. Through the efforts of Nancy Bennotti, Jean Sniffin and many 
volunteers, the clinics vaccinated more at risk adult Medfield residents that in years 
past. 

The Board of Health applied for and received two grants for our Emergency 
Preparedness Plan. At present, after coordinating efforts with the Fire and Police 
Departments, communication equipment is being ordered, and a consultant in Public 
Health will be temporarily hired to continue our efforts in improving our coordination 
and communication in the event of a disaster. 

There is a new subcommittee assessing the use of pesticides in our community. They 
are working to educate residents regarding pesticides as alternative organic 
fertilization products. A mercury disposal regulation has been written, information for 
disposal is available at the Town Hall. The Board of Health has applied for a grant to 
hire a Tobacco Control Agent. This individual would be responsible for ensuring that 
establishments are following the state laws regarding the sale of tobacco products to 
minors. 

Public Health 

Jean Sniffin, RN, BA of the Natick Visiting Nurses Association continues to provide 
programs in health promotion to all age groups, supplementing traditional home health 
services. The major components of the Health Promotion Program are: 

Health Maintenance for the Elderly 
Communicable Disease Prevention and Control 
Public Health 

The adverse affects created by the flu vaccine shortage were minimized due to the 
efforts of three residents. Joan Iafolla, RN, Jean Brown, RN and Joan Wood, RN, 
volunteer with inoculations, client assistance and paperwork. Through their efforts, 
the clinics run smoothly and provide a pleasant experience for vaccine recipients. 
The Board of Health members, Nancy Bennotti and Jean Sniffin would like to 



61 



recognize and thank Joan, Jean and Joan for their generosity, professionalism and 
commitment. 

The Medfield Board of Health continues to serve as a depot for the Department of 
Public Health, supplying area providers enrolled in the Massachusetts Immunization 
Program with immunizations and vaccines. These vaccines are provided free of 
charge through the Department of Public Health. 

Public Health Nursing statistics for 2004 are as follows: 

Communicable Disease Followup 64 cases 

Blood Pressure Clinics 24 clinics 

Flu & Pnuemonia Clinics 9 clinics 

Environmental Engineering 

William R. Domey, P.E., provided Environmental and Civil Engineering services to 
the Board of Health. These services include: Oversight of septic systems including on- 
site soil evaluations, determination of high groundwater, review of engineering plans 
for compliance with Title 5 and the Board of Health regulations, Issuance of permits; 
Inspection of construction, Evaluation of variance requests for action by the Board of 
Health; and Issuance of certificates of compliance; Review of Project Plans, Site Plans 
and preliminary and definitive Subdivision Plans for compliance with the Board of 
Health stormwater regulations and suitability for on-site sewage disposal where 
applicable; Review of On-site Well water proposals, water quality and quantity results, 
and treatment units; Review of Title 5 inspection reports that are performed, most 
often at time of sale, to assure that the inspector has followed the state mandated 
procedures for the evaluation; Review of Building Permit applications for additions 
and renovations to assure that the proposed work does not conflict with the location or 
capacity of the septic system serving the property; Investigation of complaints 
regarding sewage overflows, odors, illegal dumping, hazardous waste; Preparation of 
enforcement orders where applicable, and working with offending parties to attain 
compliance; Issuance of Disposal System Installer, Septage Hauler, and Offal 
Permits; Provision of general consultation to the Board of Health; Assistance to the 
Board of Health in the preparation of regulations and guidelines; and attendance at 
Board of Health meetings; Provision of general guidance to residents and applicants, 
in general, that need services within the jurisdiction of the Board of Health insofar as 
regulatory requirements are concerned. He is available on a daily basis for 
emergencies and also for consultation with residents and applicants. 

In the year 2004, as in previous years, the major focus of the Environmental 
Engineer/ Agent has been septic systems and stormwater management. As a result of a 
high degree of control over septic systems, the rate of failure of septic systems 
constructed since 1975 remains very low. For those who must upgrade, it should be 
noted that, to assist homeowners to minimize financial burden, the Board of Health 
issues local and state variances as needed to achieve Maximum Feasible Compliance. 



62 



These variances have to be justified by documentation of difficult or limited site 
conditions or excessive construction costs. Guidelines are available at the Board of 
Health office. Reviews of proposed Project Plans, Site Plans and Subdivisions were 
continued or newly initiated for the Castle Hill Academy, Shaw's Plaza expansion, 49 
Spring Street, Medfield Industrial Park, Erik Road Extension, the Plain Street 
conservation land sheep-keeping facility, and the Senior Center. Also, as a result of 
the recodification of the Board of Health Stormwater and Subdivision Regulations, 
applicants have a greater understanding of the requirements to obtain design 
compliance. It should be noted that the long standing existing stormwater regulations 
of the Board of Health provide Town of Medfield compliance with much of the EPA 
Phase II program. 

Sanitation 

Enviro-Tech Consultants' professional staff conducted consulting services for 
enforcement of regulations related to food establishments, massage therapy, 
swimming facilities, recreational camps for children, and general sanitation issues. 

The services and consultation to the Board of Health included attending Board of 
Health meetings, inspections of food establishments and school cafeterias, 
consultation with the Environmental Agent and State agencies. Also inspections and 
reviews were conducted on a semi-public pool and the Hinkley Swim Pond 
recreational facility, which included review of biological reports and support services 
to the Park & Recreation Department and the staff. 

New food establishments were provided with consultation for the opening of their new 
businesses. Also, non-profit facilities were provided with additional updates that 
provide information on food safety. Enviro-Tech Consultants also continued support 
services to the administrative staff on the state and local requirements. 

2004 Permits Issued: 

52 Food Services Permit - Includes: 

Restaurants, counter bars; churches, cafeteria food service 

and vending machines. Food stores / markets, bakeries. Temporary food 

service permits and catering services. 

1 Ice Cream Truck 

3 Massage Therapy (individual & establishment) 

1 Semi Public Pool 

1 Bathing Beach 

3 Camps 

Inspections and Investigations: 

• 1 12 - Food Establishment Inspections 

• 1 8 - Food Establishment visits / Distribution of Employee Reporting Forms 



63 



• 27 -Housing / Lead Paint Inspections / Reviews 

• 1 1 -Beach / Pool Inspections / Reviews 

Medfield Youth Outreach 

Purpose - Medfield Youth Outreach is a program located under the auspices of the 
Medfield Board of Health. The town's Youth Outreach Workers provide short term 
individual and family counseling, information and referral, crisis intervention, 
community programming, and assistance with access to financial assistance programs 
to Medfield residents ages birth to eighteen and their families. The Medfield Youth 
Outreach office is an intake site for the Federal Fuel Assistance Program for all 
Medfield residents. All of Medfield Youth Outreach services are free and 
confidential . 

Medfield Youth Outreach welcomed a second full time worker to its staff in 2004 due 
to the increasing need for service among the community's youth and families. This 
new position was made possible in part by funds allocated through a budget increase 
and in large part to a generous grant received from the Metro West Community Health 
Care Foundation. 

The Medfield Youth Outreach Office is located on the 2 nd floor of the Town Hall. 
Dawn Alcott, MSW LICSW, Director of Medfield Youth Outreach, and Jennifer 
Dobbins, MSW, LCSW, Youth Outreach Worker staff the office. Appointments to 
speak with office staff can be made by calling (508) 359-7121. Hours are full time 
and flexible to meet programmatic need. 

Counseling Services - In calendar year 2004, approximately 965 counseling hours 
were provided to Medfield youth and families. Major issues dealt with throughout the 
calendar year included: 

Academic Difficulties, divorce, self-esteem, anger management, domestic violence, 
anxiety, family discord, sexual assault, grief loss, financial difficulties, sexuality, body 
image/eating disorders, major mental illness, social skills, child abuse/neglect, 
oppositional behavior, substance abuse, dating violence, parenting skills, violence, 
depression, relational aggression, self harming behaviors, friendship/ relationship 
concerns 

Medfield Youth Outreach routinely provides referrals for clinical services, need based 
programs, support groups, wrap around services, advocacy, and state /federal 
programs. 

Programs - Medfield Youth Outreach also facilitates various groups, programs, and 
services with in the community that are related to the needs of youth and their 
families. The programs offered are often prevention and psycho-educationally based. 
This past year approximately 205 individuals participated in programs facilitated by 
Youth Outreach. 



64 



Community Organizing - Medfield Youth Outreach collaborates with a wide network 
of organizations to better meet the needs of Medfield youth and their families 
including: The Medfield Youth and Community Commission, Medfield Teen Action, 
Norfolk County School Partnership, Medfield Public Schools, Medfield Police 
Department, Norfolk County District Attorney's Office, and various other state and 
federal agencies, professional associations, religious institutions, parent gatherings and 
civic groups. 

Volunteers - Medfield Youth Outreach welcomes volunteers to assist with the 
implementation of various programs and fundraising endeavors. Call the Medfield 
Youth Outreach office at 508-359-7121 to inquire. 

The Board of Health holds its meetings on the second Wednesday evening of each 
month at 6:30 PM. These meetings are open to the public and citizens are invited to 
attend. Anyone interested in becoming a Board of Health member may either call the 
Board of Health office, or attend one of the regular meetings for information. The 
Board of Health office is open part-time with office hours as follows: 

Monday through Thursday 8:30 AM-12:30 PM 
Friday 8:30 AM-1 :00 PM 



Respectfully submitted, 

Kathleen Schapira, Chairperson 

Lucy Schlesinger, Member 

Marcia Aigler, Member 

Betsy Dorisca, Member 

Keith Diggans, Member 

Frances Sullivan, Associate Member 

Gregory Testa, Associate Member 



65 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Housing Authority is pleased to submit its Annual Report for 2004. 

The Authority is committed to working cooperatively with community, state, federal 
and local officials to provide safe, decent and affordable housing. 

For information and/or application for housing at Tilden Village, please contact Donna 
M. Dolan, Executive Director, at 508 359-6454. Please note that Medfield residents 
and/or those persons working in Medfield are given local preference regarding 
placement. 

A five member Board of Commissioners establishes policies; four members are 
elected by the Town and one appointed by the Governor of Massachusetts. 

Board meetings are held on the second Wednesday of each month at 6:30 PM in the 
office of the Executive Director, unless otherwise posted at the Town Hall. These 
meetings are open to the public. 

A blood pressure clinic is held on the third Tuesday of every month in the Community 
Room. 

TRIAD meetings are held on the fourth Wednesday of every month in the Community 
Room. Police Chief Richard Hurley continues to give his time and dedication, 
providing informative and interesting topics for each meeting. All Medfield seniors 
are encouraged to attend these meetings, as our success will only occur through a 
cooperative community effort. 

We are happy to report that this past year we resurfaced our roadway, parking areas, 
and sidewalks and now have a safer roadway, more parking for our residents, granite 
curbing and proper drainage. 

We would like to extend our heartfelt thanks to Chief Hurley and to Superintendent of 
Schools Robert Maguire for their support during our roadway construction. Without 
these two special gentlemen, we could not have provided off site parking for our 
residents during the construction process. To the residents of Sanders Way who 
allowed us to park on their street and who were so patient, we are extremely grateful. 
To the members of the high school Student Council who gave up their parking spots 
so our residents could park, we are truly indebted. A special thank you to Richard 
DeSorgher and Dave Gibbs who coordinated the high school parking. We are indeed 



66 



fortunate to live in such a caring community. All the cooperation we received during 
our construction process was greatly appreciated. 

We would also like to thank the Beacon Project from the Dale Street School. The 
Beacon Buddies bring friendship, and love and make our lives so much more 
enjoyable. Their visits and holiday dinners are happily anticipated and very much 
appreciated. 

The Blake Middle School eighth graders and staff hosted a delicious holiday dinner 
for all our residents. This event continues to be a favorite with Tilden residents. A 
special thank you to Middle School teacher Kathy Craig who coordinated this much- 
enjoyed occasion. 

Special thanks to the Brownie and Girl Scout troops and to the youth groups from the 
various churches that brought events and programs to Tilden Village throughout the 
year. 

The Medfield Housing Authority wishes to express its gratitude and thanks to both the 
Fire Department and the Police Department for their dedicated support and assistance 
during the past year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

James T. Regan, Chairman 
Lisa Donovan, Commissioner 
L. Paul Galante, Jr., Commissioner 
Richard D. Jordan, Treasurer 
Valerie Mariani, State Appointee 
Donna M. Dolan, Executive Director 



67 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfleld: 



The Council on Aging continues under the direction of the following board members: 
Mr. Louis Fellini, Chairman, Mrs. Kathleen Kristof, Vice Chairman, Ruth Nadler, 
Ann Ciancarelli and Virginia Whyte. This board has been instrumental in allowing 
and encouraging necessary changes for the growth and success of the Council on 
Aging. 

This by far is one of the most exciting years for the Medfleld Council on Aging. After 
several years of programming enhancements and increasing services, the community 
supported the COA and voted in favor of funding a new "Adult Community Center" 
which will be the future home of the Council on Aging. 

Since Town meeting in April of 2004, the architect, Graham-Meus has been 
completing the design and development documents, the County Engineers have been 
surveying and developing a site plan, the drainage plans are almost completed and we 
continue to move in the direction of bids and construction. Although slower than 
expected, the necessary requirements are moving forward so that our building will go 
up smoothly. Excitement among Council on Aging members continues to build as 
each day passes and each phase is completed. 

Programs and services continue to be provided in a timely and professional manner 
meeting the needs of the older adult community. The part time outreach efforts by 
Marion Masterson offer seniors knowledge and vital information. Marion Masterson's 
efforts reached over 105 new seniors during the course of the year. Newsletter 
subscriptions are up and we are most appreciative of all our supporters who advertise 
regularly. Medical equipment loans have increased with 34 pieces of equipment 
loaned out. Transportation, under the direction of Juan Anacleto, is at its peak with 
nearly 1200 miles driven each month. One of the biggest benefits of our 
transportation program is it allows seniors an opportunity to maintain their 
independence. The volunteer program supervised by Patsy Nettles continues to 
service the medical ride needs of the seniors, along with managing the almost 4000 
hours of volunteer time within the COA. With that said, Patsy Nettles is always 
looking for new people to donate their time to help the COA. Ms. Nettles, along with 
volunteer Beverly Mahabir, were co-authors of the COA Cuisine Cookbook. Selling 
nearly all two hundred cookbooks is an indication of its huge success. Attendance at 
health clinics is constant with over 180 recipients of service yearly. Participation 
continues to be growing over all with the COA. The addition of seven new computers 
to our technology wall has gained in popularity. Programs and events are creative and 



68 



informative, like the newly organized bridge and whist groups and the general 
atmosphere in the Seniors Room is one of friendship, support, respect and growth. 

During the course of the year, we have successfully applied and received grant money 
that helps to enhance our services. Grants for the following have been received: an 
Automated External Defibrillator through the Medfield Women's Association and the 
New *N Towne Club, improvements in transportation through a grant from MARtap, 
funding for our volunteer coordinator through the Formula Grant from the State of 
Massachusetts, and internet access through a grant from Comcast. 

The Council on Aging is delighted to see our Friends Group (FOSI) as an active and 
supportive extension of the Council on Aging. Mr. William Johnson, as president, and 
FOSI members, Kathleen Kristof, Barbara Tubridy, Anne Johnson, Ruth Nadler, Carol 
Wright and Jane Timmerman have worked diligently to fund raise for the TRIAD 
Project Lifesaver Program, along with supporting programs, i.e., the COA exercise 
program and unlimited supply of coffee in the Seniors Room. FOSI anticipates their 
next project to be furnishing the new Adult Community Center and looks to the 
enthusiastic support from the business community to help them achieve their goal. 

As always, the Council on Aging would like to thank everyone who participates, 
supports and donates to the Council on Aging. It is your generosity and interest that 
helps the Council on Aging meet the needs of the older adults in our community. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Roberta Lynch, Director 
Louis Fellini, Chairman 
Kathleen Kristof, Vice Chairman 
Ruth Nadler 
Virginia Whyte 
Ann Ciancarelli 



69 



PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Parks and Recreation Commission is a five member, elected board of 
volunteers. The Commission is charged with the responsibility of maintaining the 
Pfaff Community Center and 11 other public properties - Town Hall, Library, 
Historical Society, Dwight Derby House, Fire Department, Police Department, 
Metacomet Park, Hinkley Park and Swim Pond, Baxter Park, Meeting House Pond 
and McCarthy Park. 

The Commission's responsibilities include: recruiting qualified personnel; creating 
policies; generating diversified recreational and educational opportunities; monitoring 
the maintenance schedule for public properties; and advising the Director to achieve 
the goals set forth in the Parks and Recreation Comprehensive Plan. The department 
consists of a Director and Assistant Director. Additional personnel are recruited to 
teach classes and organize summer programs. Responsibilities of the department 
include: creating, implementing, evaluating and adjusting year round leisure 
experiences; establishing fiscal and personnel plans to complete the objectives for 
each program; monitoring public property usage; and implementing a maintenance 
regime for Town properties. 

Capital improvements and maintenance continues to be a priority. The Commission 
supports a centralized scheduling and maintenance system for public properties. It is 
the Commission's intent to assist in simplifying the process for reserving all athletic 
fields and to ensure that routine maintenance is being performed. Capital 
improvement goals include improving the quality of all of our parks and recreation 
resources to make them safe and clean for the public to use. Challenges in 2004 
include increased vandalism, breaking and entering, larceny and destruction of public 
property. The Commission continues to strive to become more self-sufficient and has 
presented to the community a plan in which to do so. 

The Parks and Recreation Department is dedicated to providing quality programs that 
will enhance the quality of life for Medfield residents. The Department offered three 
hundred affordable enrichment programs throughout the year. Eight thousand 
individual registrants have enjoyed participating in a wide range of programs. 
Thousands more competed on our athletic fields; reflected in our memorial parks or 
utilized our recreational facilities. Parks and Recreation is a vital resource that brings 
a community together. 



70 



We would like to take this opportunity to thank the scores of residents who volunteer 
their time and energies in our recreation and sports programs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jim Landry, Chairman 
Tom Caragliano, Secretary 
Lisa Louttit 
Steve Farrar 







71 



TREE WARDEN AND INSECT CONTROL DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report is for the calendar year ending December 31, 2004. 

The Town has purchased a Moback Chipper. This has been very useful for all Town 
Departments. 

Nstar has cleared three line circuits, which included trimming and some tree removal. 
The Town did not receive a reimbursement for the Tree Warden's time and inspection 
for this project; instead Nstar donated a $1000.00 Weston Nursery gift certificate. It 
will be used for planting trees and tree maintenance. 

We continue to survey the Bicentennial trees. We are pleased to report 90% of the 
trees are flourishing. 

The stump removal program throughout Town continues to be implemented. 

McMillan Professional Tree Service's bid was accepted for a three-year contract. 

We continuously survey, recognize and remedy potential hazardous tree conditions 
before serious problems occur. 

Applying early treatment will reduce the effects of the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid that 
are starting to appear in the hemlocks around the town. 

I would like to thank all various Town Departments for all their help throughout the 
year. 

Residents are reminded that if they DO NOT wish spraying to be done on their 
property, prior notice must be sent to the Town Clerk, by registered mail not later than 
March 1 of that year. This notice must be given each year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Edward M. Hinkley 

Tree warden 

Director of Insect Pest Control 



72 



Norfolk County Commissioners 



To the Citizens of Norfolk County: 

We are proud to serve our constituents as Norfolk County Commissioners. Our 
county has an abundance of resources and within the realm of county government 
during the fiscal year, we are especially proud of the following highlights: 

• Registry of Deeds - Implementation of upgraded computer systems in all 
areas, significant reductions in backlogs and waiting times, adoption of 
improved data security and disaster recovery plans, addition of a customer 
service center and expanded real estate closing areas, as well as 
introduction of Internet-accessible online land record and title research. 

• Norfolk County Agricultural High School - Two new programs are 
planned for the future: Biotechnology and Agritourism, Once again the 
FFA Chapter won the State Sweepstakes (highest points of large 
agricultural schools) and a delegation was sent to the National Convention 
in Louisville Kentucky, a $280,000.00 grant from the Massachusetts 
Department of Education allowed renovation and upgrade the Chemistry 
Lab. Our school average is near or above the state average in ELA and 
Math. We continue to be above target with the goals set by the 
Massachusetts Department of Education. 

• Wollaston Recreational Facility - completed major renovation of the 
bunkers on holes #11 and #18, hosted the popular Annual Norfolk County 
Classic. Over 30,000 rounds of golf were played 

• Courthouses - Numerous improvements included a new fire protection 
system for Brookline Courthouse, installation of a new flagpole at 
Superior Courthouse, parking lot expansion at Wrentham District Court, 
Registry parking lot repair. 

• County Engineering Services - provided valuable, cost-free engineering 
services to numerous Norfolk County communities. Included supervising 
installation of Wrentham Septic System. Performed boundary line survey 
of all wooded areas for Norfolk County Agricultural High School. Near 
completion for Foxboro is preparation of five street acceptance plans. The 
Needham DPW site was surveyed for future expansion. 

• The Norfolk County Sheriffs Dept. provided many valuable services to 
communities and is described in detail, in the complete County Annual 
Report for Fiscal Year 2004. Capital improvements included demolition 
and construction of a new, flat roof, upgrade of water supply systems- 



73 



Phase 2, and new partitions and flooring i.e. handicap privacy petitions, 
throughout the institution. 

• Use of the County's new computer system continued to expand for use by 
county departments off-site (outside of Dedham). 

• Norfolk County R.S.V.P. - RSVP, working in conjunction with the staff 
of the Norfolk County Sheriffs Office & Correctional Center, has 
established the "Back on Track" mentoring program for pre-release 
inmates. Volunteers co-facilitate discussion groups in areas such as 
employment, education, budgeting/monetary concerns, housing, conflict 
resolution and life skills. In August 2004, over 300 volunteers and 
administrative staff attended our Annual Volunteer Recognition Luncheon 
in Randolph. 

• Municipal Regional Services - 10 municipalities were officially 
designated by the Commonwealth, as an Economic Target Area (ETA). 
Towns included are: Bellingham, Foxborough, Franklin, Mansfield, 
Medway, Norfolk, North Attleboro, Plainville, Walpole, and Wrentham. 
The collaborative effort will result in attracting businesses and industry to 
the areas. 



As County Commissioners, we convey our thanks to our legislators for their 
support. Thanks also to municipal officials, members of the Norfolk County 
Advisory Board, and our department heads and employees for continuing to 
perform their jobs in an exemplary manner. A special thanks to our citizens 
for allowing us the privilege of serving them. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Peter H. Collins, Chairman 

John M. Gillis 

Francis W. O'Brien 

NORFOLK COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 



74 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council is the regional planning and economic 
development district representing 101 cities and towns in metropolitan Boston. In 
addition, the Council shares oversight responsibility for the region's federally funded 
transportation program as one of 14 members of the Boston Metropolitan Planning 
Organization. The Council's legislative mandate is to provide technical and professional 
resources to improve the physical, social and economic condition of its district, and to 
develop sound responses to issues of regional significance. The Council provides 
research, studies, publications, facilitation and technical assistance in the areas of land 
use and the environment, housing, transportation, water resources management, 
economic development, demographic and socioeconomic data, legislative policy and 
interlocal partnerships that strengthen the operation of local governments. 

The Council is governed by 101 municipal government representatives, 21 gubernatorial 
appointees, and 10 state and 3 city of Boston officials. An Executive Committee 
composed of 25 members oversees agency operations and appoints an executive director. 
The agency employs approximately 30 professional and administrative staff. Funding for 
Council activities is derived from contracts with government agencies and private 
entities, foundation grants, and a per-capita assessment charged to municipalities within 
the district. 

In the past year, the Council has focused on initiatives that respond to regional 
challenges, some of which include: 

• Municipal planning: working with more than 25 communities under the 
Executive Order 418 program. EO 418 provides communities with up to S3 0,000 
in state funding to undertake overall visioning on local planning issues, including 
housing, economic development, natural resources, and transportation. 

• Bringing advanced technology to cities and towns in the region: a contract 
with Pictometry International will provide aerial photographic images that 
municipal departments, including police and fire, can utilize to improve service 
delivery. 

• Adoption of smart growth principles: MAPC developed and adopted principles 
of good planning practice that will encourage sustainable patterns of growth to 
benefit people living throughout the metro Boston region. MAPC is also a 
founding member of the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance. 

• Metro Data Center: The Center is an official US Census affiliate, helping to 
distribute demographic data throughout the region, including demographic, 
economic, and housing profiles for all 101 communities in metro Boston. 

• Transportation planning: as vice chair of the Boston Metropolitan Planning 
Organization, MAPC worked to develop the 25-year Regional Transportation 

75 



Plan as well as the annual Transportation Improvement Program, including 
transportation spending priorities for the region. We also spearheaded 
development of transportation spending criteria, taking into account 
environmental, economic, and equity considerations. 

• Metropolitan Highway System Advisory Board: MAPC staffs this board, 
established in 1997 by the Commonwealth to advise the Massachusetts Turnpike 
Authority on issues relative to land use, air rights, zoning, and environmental 
impacts associated with development of land owned by the authority. 

• Regional Services Consortiums: The four regional consortiums established by 
MAPC collectively purchased $18 million in office supplies and highway 
maintenance services for its 31 member municipalities. The project also 
facilitates collegial forums among members' chief administrative officers focused 
on collaborative problem solving and resource sharing. MAPC recently became 
the purchasing and administrative agent for the Greater Boston Police Council, 
which assists over 300 units of local government in the purchase of police 
vehicles and other public safety supplies. 

• Metro Mayors Coalition: Working with the mayors and city managers of 10 
municipalities in the urban core on issues such as group purchasing, employee 
health insurance, security and emergency coordination, and municipal relief 
legislation. 

• Homeland security: addressing homeland security issues by facilitating cross- 
municipal partnerships between police, fire, and emergency management 
departments to acquire and share equipment, and more generally to plan for 
emergencies involving multiple municipalities; fiduciary agent for state/ federal 
grant funding through the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety. 

• Hazard mitigation: initiating a federally- funded partnership to produce a hazard 
mitigation plan to protect nine coastal communities in the event of natural 
disasters, including flood, winter storm, wind, fire, and geologic hazards. 

Please visit our website, www.mapc.org, for more details about these and other activities. 

Metrofuture: Making A Greater Boston Region 

MAPC has launched a new civic process, called MetroFuture, to create an updated 
regional vision and growth strategy for metropolitan Boston. MetroFuture engages city 
and town governments, state agencies, non-profits, business, labor and academic groups 
in this planning process. The outcome will be a vision and growth strategy that puts the 
region on a sustainable path in terms of land use, economic, environmental and social 
issues. MAPC will need the support of a broad range of organizations in the region to 
help plan, fund and implement this new framework for addressing the challenges facing 
metropolitan Boston. 

The effort to create this new strategy was launched on October 29, 2003 at a Boston 
College Citizens Seminar. More than 400 citizens from a wide range of local and regional 
groups attended the event, and expressed their opinions on the region's resources and 
challenges as well as their own visions for the future. This input will be critical as we 

76 



move to the next phase of this exciting multi-year project. Please visit the project web 
site, www.metrofuture.org, for more information. 



TRIC Communities 

In 2004, the Three Rivers Interlocal Council (TRIC), one of the eight subregions of 
MAPC, met on a monthly basis to discuss issues of mutual interest from community 
development planning to transportation issues. TRIC is comprised of the communities of 
Canton, Dedham, Dover, Foxborough, Medfield, Milton, Needham, Norwood, Sharon, 
Stoughton, Walpole, and Westwood. 

During the year, TRIC heard presentations regarding and provided input to MAPC's 
actions relating to the following regional transportation issues: Suburban Mobility 
program, 2005 Transportation Improvement Program, and the 2005 Unified Planning 
Work Program. TRIC participated on the Regional Transportation Advisory Committee 
(RTAC). TRIC developed a set of subregional legislative priority issues to help guide 
MAPC's priorities, and for use in a TRIC Legislative Forum meeting between municipal 
officials and state senators and representatives. The subregion was briefed periodically 
on the MetroFuture project, the on-going review of the subregions that is taking place in 
conjunction with the MAPC strategic planning process, and other activities of MAPC. 

MAPC completed a Community Development Plan under Executive Order 418 for the 
Towns of Milton and Stoughton. MAPC also assisted several communities by 
administering their planning contracts with private planning consultants under E0418. 
As a follow-up to Executive Order 418, MAPC presented information on three state 
initiatives; the Commonwealth Capital Fund, the Priority Development Fund and the 40R 
Smart Growth Zoning initiative. MAPC also assisted Canton, Sharon, Stoughton, and 
Walpole completing the Commonwealth Capital Fund applications. 

MAPC Annual Report prepared and submitted by Marc D. Draisen, Executive Director, 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council. 



77 



NORFOLK COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield 

The operational program of the Project integrates all proven technologies into an 
Integrated Pest Management (IPM) system of mosquito control and vector 
management that is rational, environmentally sensitive and cost effective. 

All mosquito eggs need water to hatch and to sustain larval growth. 

Water Management Activities 

An important component of our IPM approach is the management of shallow, 
standing, stagnant water, and the maintenance of existing flow systems which if 
neglected can contribute to mosquito breeding. In addition to normal drainage system 
maintenance, Project personnel advised residents on removal of water holding 
artificial containers on their property for the purpose of eliminating potential West 
Nile virus mosquito breeding habitat. 

Drainage ditches checked/cleaned 4,665 feet 

Culverts checked/cleaned 66 culverts 

Water Management by wide-track backhoes 1 95 feet 

Larval Control 

Treatment of mosquito larvae during aquatic development is the next most effective 
control effort. The products used during these applications were Bti and Methoprene. 

Spring aerial larvicide applications 654 acres 

Larval control using briquette & granular applications 9.2 acres 

Rain Basin treatments using briquettes (West Nile virus control) 193 basins 

Adult Control 

The suppression of flying adult mosquitoes becomes necessary when they are 
numerous, annoying, and/or threaten public health. The product used during these 
applications was Sumithrin. 

Adult control aerosol applications from trucks 7,424 acres 

Surveillance 

Surveys, inspections, and monitoring in support of our program include GIS mapping 
of breeding areas, larval and adult collections, and fieldwork evaluations leading to 
better water management. West Nile virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis have been 
active in Norfolk County over the past several years which has resulted in an 
expansion of the surveillance program in collaboration with the Massachusetts 



78 



department of Public Health (MDPH), State Laboratory Institute. MDPH has 
requested that the Norfolk County Mosquito Control Project expand mosquito 
surveillance across the county for the purpose of detecting viruses in collected 
mosquitoes as an early warning system for the residents of the county. Considerable 
manpower has been reallocated to these efforts, which is not reflected in this report. 



Respectfully Submitted, 



John J. Smith, Director 




79 



TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL 
SCHOOL DISTRICT 



In July 2004 the School Committee reorganized and elected the following officers: 
Chairman, Robert McLintock (Seekonk), Vice-Chair Sheila Fisher (North Attleboro) 
and Secretary, Robert Rappa (Franklin). 

The School Committee conducts its regularly scheduled meetings on the third 
Wednesday of each month at 7:00 P.M. in the Committee Meeting Room at the 
school. Sub-committee meetings are scheduled as needed. 

Graduation 

On June 5, 2004, 178 students were graduated in an impressive afternoon ceremony. 
Robert McLintock, Chairman of the Tri-County School Committee, delivered the 
welcoming address to more than one thousand guests. Music was provided by the 
Millis High School Band. Jean Walker, Director of Guidance, presented scholarships 
and awards totaling $230,000 to deserving seniors. 

Pupil Personnel Services 

In September 2003, Tri-County welcomed approximately 868 students to the new 
school year. The district towns and number of students are Franklin 168, Medfield 8, 
Medway 44, Millis 37, Norfolk 30, North Attleboro 211, Plainville 84, Seekonk 76, 
Sherborn 7, Walpole 54, and Wrentham 75. Also 60 students were accepted from out- 
of-district areas. 

During the 2003-2004 school year the Pupil Personnel Department continued its 
programs to provide information to students, parents, sending schools and District 
communities. The Department provided counseling for students regarding career 
pathways and post-secondary education. The Peer Helpers assisted in introducing Tri- 
County to junior high school students in sending communities and assisted new 
students in adjusting to Tri-County. A growing and successful Peer Mediators 
program offered conflict resolution for students by students. Safe and Drug Free 
presentations were offered to students school wide. The Guidance Department 
presented programs on preparing for college with the assistance of personnel from 
Dean College. Tri-County hosted Career Days for over 2,000 Grade 8 students from 
the Regional District. 

Tri-County' s Career Advisement Program (CAP) was offered to all students in Grades 
9-12 to assist students in preparing for their career pathways. This was the 7 th year 
the program was offered, having started in September 1997. 



80 



Academics 

Tri-County's academic program continues to focus on the Massachusetts Curriculum 
Frameworks and successful preparation for the related MCAS tests. Our endeavors in 
this regard reflect a multi-faceted approach, which includes professional development 
for faculty, raising of curriculum standards, development of various student support 
mechanisms, multiple diagnostic assessments, and analysis of school-based data. 

We continue to incorporate technology into the instructional environment and have 
expanded our computer labs to three for academic class instruction. Various computer 
programs and computerized devices are being implemented in the learning process 
throughout the academic program area. 

The most exciting academic achievement to occur this year is the continued 
implementation and refinement of the required Senior Project, an integrated academic 
and vocational experience for our seniors. All seniors were required to participate. 
Components included a ten-page research paper; development of a product or service, 
and a ten to twenty minute presentation before a panel of judges including a teacher, 
an administrator and an industry representative. All Senior Project components must 
be completed for a student to graduate. True collaboration between the English 
teachers and the Vocational teachers resulted in a deeper learning experience for each 
student and provided an academic focus for seniors throughout their school year. 

In continuing to prepare students for either the work force and/or college Tri-County is 
now offering AP Calculus, Civics, Web Design, and continues to offer Spanish. With 
the increase in both academic and vocational-technical rigor Tri-County students are 
required to pass four years of English, Mathematics, and Science; three and a half 
years of a shop major; three years of Social Studies (including 2 years of U.S. 
History); and two years of physical education/health and vocational related. 

Vocational/Technical Programs 

During the 2003-2004 school year efforts were continued to acquire third party 
program approvals for all of our career and technical education courses. Currently the 
following programs have achieved certification from trade or industry groups: 

Auto Body - Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) 

Auto Technology - Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) 

Computer Technology - A+; Cisco Certified Network Associates; Network + 

Cosmetology - Commonwealth of Mass. Board of Registration of 

Cosmetology 

Culinary Arts - American Culinary Foundation 

Early Childhood Careers - Mass. Office for Child Care Services 

Electrical - Mass. State Board of Electrical Examiners 

Facilities Management - American Welding Society 

Marketing - Microsoft Office User specialist 

Medical Careers - Mass. DPH Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) 



81 



Plumbing & Hydremic Heating - Mass. State Board of Examiners of 
Plumbing & Gas Fitters 

Precision Machining - (NLMS) National Institute for Metalworking Skills 
Culinary Arts - (Prostart) Massachusetts Restaurant Association 

We will continue to seek similar approvals in other career and technical fields as it is 
one other way of validating our offerings and ensuring that students are receiving 
instruction in skill areas needed for the twenty-first century workforce. 

Continuing Education 

The Continuing Education Program offers an Adult Cosmetology program during the 
day. The program runs from September to May and follows the high school calendar. 
Registration for this program takes place at the end of May each year. The Evening 
School Division enrolled approximately 500 students for the 2003-04 school year. 
Registration for the Evening Division takes place in September and January. 
Continuing Education brochures can be obtained at your local Town Hall. 

Student Activities 

National Honor Society 

Membership begins in the eleventh and twelfth grades based on the academic review 
commencing third term of sophomore year. Upon meeting the scholastic requirements, 
the National Honor Society Advisor will notify each potential Grade 10-12 candidate 
with directions for completion of a NHS Portfolio. This includes evidence of 
Leadership, Service, Character, three (3) letters of recommendation and a personal 
statement. 

The Peter H. Rickard Chapter of Tri-County is comprised of ten seniors and juniors. 
During the school year 2003-2004, the group participated in many fund-raising and 
community services both in and out of school. In November, NHS organized a school 
wide Holiday Food Drive that collected 1500 lbs. of nonperishable food. Food baskets 
were distributed to needy families in the Franklin area. The remaining food was 
distributed to the Franklin Food Pantry and other local soup kitchens. 

It has been the tradition of NHS to host a "Leadership Breakfast" in March, honoring 
students who have shown outstanding achievement during the school year. Students 
organize the event, help with set up in Gerry's Place, and cheer on the participants. 

NHS students volunteer their time to distribute daffodils during the "Daffodil for 
Cancer" weekend in April. They participated in the May Walk for Hunger, and in 
February they organized a two day Read-A-Thon at Next Generation Day Care and 
Preschool in Franklin. The Read-A-Thon included a puppet show, and the students 
visited different classrooms, giving presentations and reading in celebration of 
Literacy Month. 



82 



The school year ended with the organization and presentation of Tri-County's 
thirteenth annual Honors Night. NHS students stuffed envelopes, delivered letters to 
students, and helped to set up and distribute awards on this most important night. 

Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (Skills USA-VIC A) 

A national professional organization for career and technical student, Skills USA- 
VICA provides leadership, citizenship and character development programs and 
activities, as well as opportunities for awards, tools, and scholarships through local, 
district, state, national and even international competitions in trade, leadership and 
demonstration programs. 

Skills USA-VICA emphasizes respect for the dignity of work, quality products and 
services, leadership, and concern for others. Members also learn about the democratic 
process and proper business procedure through the ordinary workings of the 
organization at the local level. In addition, members participate in activities, 
workshops and conferences to develop their job skills as well as their personal 
communications and leadership abilities. Through community service projects, they 
learn the value of service to others as a lifetime commitment. 

Business Professionals of America 

A national organization for high school students enrolled in marketing programs, BPA 
prepares its members for future leadership roles in marketing, management and 
entrepreneurship. BPA emphasizes leadership development, civic consciousness, 
social intelligence and vocational understanding. Students compete in both written 
and oral events at the district, state and national levels. 

The marketing students also competed at the Massachusetts School Bank Association 
State Spring Conference. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Student Advisory Committee 

The student body elects five (5) students to membership on the Student Advisory 
Committee. The principal appoints one of these elected members who will report 
student concerns and activities to the Tri-County School Committee each month; two 
(2) students from this group sit on the Tri-County School Improvement Council; and 
two (2) serve on the High Schools That Work Site Committee. 

The student body chooses two (2) students to represent Tri-County on the State 
Student Advisory Committee. These seven (7) students also serve as ex officio 
members of the Student Council. 



83 



Class Officers 

The freshman, sophomore and junior classes will elect a President, Vice-President, 
Secretary, and Treasurer for their respective classes for the following school year. The 
incoming freshman class hold an election for class officers no later than the last day 
of the first academic term. Under the supervision of the Class Advisor, officers will 
schedule, organize and conduct monthly after-school meetings of their respective 
classes, to plan activities and hear concerns that they can communicate to the Student 
Advisory Committee. Class officers serve as ex officio members of the Student 
Council. 

Student Council 

Each class elects four (4) representatives to the Student Council for the following 
year. These students, along with the class officers and the five Student Advisory 
Committee members, will serve as the overall student governing body. The group will 
meet at least bi-weekly after school, and will advise the faculty and administration of 
the day-to-day needs and concerns of the student body. Under the supervision of the 
Student Council Advisor, this group is also accountable for conducting and ensuring 
fair elections for Class Officers, the Student Advisory Committee, and the at-large 
Student Council membership. 

In addition, the Student Council plans and coordinates, civic, social, fund-raising, and 
community service activities. 

OPEN MEMBERSHIP ACTIVITIES 

There are 9 different open membership activities at Tri-County. They are: 

Chess Club 

Drama Club 

Math Club 

Peer Helpers 

SADD 

Spanish Club 

Student Newspaper 

Teens Against Ignorance 

Yearbook 

Summary 

As we continue to provide for the educational needs of our students, we wish to thank 
District residents for their support and cooperation. In the future we intend to 
maintain the high educational standard that has earned Tri-County that support. 

Sincerely, 

Robert McLintock, Chairman Karl D. Lord, T. C. School Committee 



84 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



REPORT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2004 



85 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The School Committee is extremely grateful for the outstanding staff of administrators, 
teachers and support personnel who work in the district. Due to their hard work and 
dedication, the Medfield Public School System remains one of the top school districts in 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Superintendent Maguire, we recognize that you 
continue to provide outstanding leadership and work tirelessly to deliver an excellent 
education to the school children of Medfield. We all thank you for your efforts and 
dedication. 

Simply stated, 2004 was a busy and productive year. The operating budget and school 
construction remained the focus of many discussions. We also celebrated the opening 
and rededication of the newly renovated Memorial School, conducted searches for 
several administrator positions, negotiated a new teacher's contract, and amended some 
existing School Committee policies. The detail of these issues follows: 

BUDGET 

After a lengthy budget process and several budget meetings, the School Committee 
passed a needs-based budget that we believed to be adequate to maintain the current level 
of service without diminishing the quality of our school system. This budget represented 
an 8.83% increase over the FY04 budget. The town requested that all departments' 
budgets not exceed 4% over the previous year's budget. With increased student 
enrollment, contractual obligations, and increased transportation and utilities costs, move 
ahead costs alone exceeded the 4%. The School Committee, Superintendent and 
Administrators worked hard to eliminate items in the budget with the goal to only make 
cuts that would have the least impact on students in the classroom. Through a difficult 
process we eliminated $91,500 worth of items. During this period of highly publicized 
fiscal challenges we were able to maintain personnel levels thereby limiting the 
educational impact of higher student/teacher ratios. 

Following these discussions, the School Committee presented a final budget of 
$20,698,047 to the Warrant Committee and town officials. This budget, combined with 
budget numbers for all town departments made it necessary for the town to ask residents 
for a Proposition 2 l A override in the amount of $657,000 which was appropriated at the 
annual Town Meeting on April 26, 2004. 

It is important to note that Medfield continues to rank low in per pupil spending when 
compared to all communities in the state. In 2003, (last data reported) we spent $6,517 
per pupil, which is 21% below the state average. We are in the bottom 3% in per pupil 
spending in the state. Our increased enrollment gave us a modest funding increase, but 
the amount did not adequately cover the shortfalls. Despite these staggering statistics, 



86 



securing Local Aid and Chapter 70 monies from the state continues to be a problem for 
Medfield. It is also significant to note that in 2004 the court heard the case of Hancock 
vs. Driscoll, a lawsuit that challenges school funding in the Commonwealth. The 
presiding judge ruled that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts does not adequately fund 
education for its school children. The final ruling has yet to be announced. We will 
continue to educate our state representatives on our fiscal needs and lobby for Medfield 
to receive its fair share of funding. 

SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION 

Construction at the Memorial School was completed during the summer and the building 
was functional for the opening of school. We would like to recognize members of the 
School Planning and Building Committee, Tim Bonfatti, Dick McCullough, David 
Binder, Susan Cotter, Keith Mozer, and ex-officio member Superintendent Maguire for 
the countless hours they have dedicated since 1999 to deliver a beautifully renovated 
building and new addition. Barbara Levine, Principal of Memorial School and her staff 
deserve much credit for their hard work, flexibility, and tolerance during the construction 
process. They continued to provide a quality education to our youngest school children 
despite several construction impediments. 

On September 18th, a celebration was held in honor of the completion of the new 
Memorial School. A rededication ceremony honoring Medfield' s World War II veterans 
was a highlight of the program with an unveiling of the refurbished plaque that hangs 
outside of the school. The School Committee representative to the School Planning and 
Building Committee, Susan Cotter, has dedicated countless hours to both projects in 
addition to fulfilling her School Committee duties. We are grateful to Susan for sharing 
her expertise and time on these two committees. 

Construction at the Thomas A. Blake building has been challenging, complex, and time 
consuming. Once again the School Planning and Building Committee as well as 
Superintendent Maguire have worked endless hours to keep the contractor on task. In 
addition, they have developed re-phasing plans when target completion dates were not 
met. In April, the middle school students moved into new classrooms in two new wings. 
The middle school staff now occupies the administrative wing. The work continued over 
the summer and fall, but despite many efforts the contractor failed to have the project 
completed by the target date of December 31st. New re-phasing plans were agreed upon 
and a new completion date has been set for May/June of 2005. 

We would like to acknowledge Principal Peg Mongiello of the Thomas A. Blake Middle 
School and her staff for being tolerant, flexible and creative during the construction 
process. Upon the opening of school in August, the gym and cafeteria were still under 
construction and not available for use. The unfinished auditorium became the 
"Warehouse Cafe" where Blake students had lunch with food being prepared at the high 
school and transported to Blake. The new foyer became a makeshift ping-pong hall for 



87 



gym class and a beautiful venue for the winter dance. They have remained positive and j 
upbeat making the best of every challenge in front of them. Thank you! 

POLICIES 

We revised some policies this year to insure they provided clear direction. The Student 
Activity Agency Accounts policy was revised to reflect maximum balances allowed in 
these accounts and withdrawal procedures. Also, after much discussion, our School 
Calendar policy was revised to read that if Labor Day falls on September 1, 2, or 3, then 
school would open after the holiday weekend. If it falls on the 4 th or later, then school 
will open before the holiday weekend. We hope this revision will help parents to plan 
better by knowing when school will start in a given year. Subsequently, we reviewed and 
studied policies from other towns regarding the naming of buildings. We recognized that 
this is an important matter that deserved thoughtful attention and revised the policy to 
reflect its significance. We voted unanimously to transfer the existing names of the 
Middle School and High School buildings with the student body upon completion of the 
construction project. In other words, the name Thomas A. Blake will be transferred to 
the existing Kingsbury building and vice versa. Other policies that were revised were the 
Bidding Requirements (Policy DJE), the School Committee Election of Officers (Policy 
BDA) and Student Travel (Policy JJA). 



HIGHLIGHTS 

We welcomed many new administrators to the system this year. Patricia Gorman joined 
us as the Principal of Wheelock School. She came with lots of energy and ideas and is a 
welcome addition to our talented staff. 

Kim Cave, Co-Director of Curriculum and Technology, became the Principal of the Dale 
Street School. Kim taught at Dale Street School prior to becoming the Curriculum 
Director and brought a wealth of experience and knowledge to the position. 

Charles Kellner joined the Business Office as the new Director of Business and Finance. 
Charlie has held positions as both a Business Director as well as a Town Administrator. 

Pamela Shufro replaced Kim Cave and Carol Suby as the Director of Curriculum & 
Assessment. Pam is a welcome addition and brings much experience with her including 
holding teaching positions at Harvard and Lesley Colleges. 

Future Management Systems, Inc. was hired to develop a five-year Strategic Plan for the 
district. Following a seven month study, the committee will review a detailed report that 
describes the vision that our administrators, staff members, community members, and 
students have for the district. 



88 



The School Committee was pleased to come to a satisfactory result on negotiating the 
teacher contract. The negotiations were cordial, both sides worked extremely hard and 
all considered it a successful outcome. In a time of tight budgets many communities are 
going months into years without successfully negotiating a contract; therefore, we felt 
fortunate to resolve the contract amicably. 

In late spring, a group of residents approached the superintendent and the School 
Committee with the idea of replacing the existing football field with a new artificial 
surface field using private funds. In a short period of time, they held fundraisers, 
contracted a company, acquired financing, started field work, and completed resurfacing 
for the fall 2004 sports season. We are grateful for their ingenuity, commitment, and hard 
work to make this project a success. 

The community continues to provide outstanding support to the district for which we are 
very grateful. From fulfilling teacher requests, to building new playgrounds, to funding 
grants for teachers, to volunteering in classrooms, this support plays an integral part in 
the success of our district. We also recognize the efforts and dedication of the Medfield 
Coalition for Public Education, the Community School Associations, the Boosters, the 
Medfield Foundation, the parents and students, all who value education as a top priority. 

The School Committee is continually looking for ways to better communicate with 
residents. We continue to provide highlights from our meetings in School Committee 
News located at www.medfield.net. We also changed the venue of our meetings to the 
Cable 8 studio at the Blake building. The studio provides better lighting, improved sound 
and clearer video. 

In closing, I want to thank my colleagues on the School Committee — Susan Ruzzo, Vice 
Chair; Susan Cotter, Treasurer; Steven Kramer, Secretary and Carolyn Casey, Member. 
Each member brings special talents and expertise to the group, which helps balance the 
workload and makes for a great team. They are dedicated, hard working and committed 
to assuring Medfield's school children receive an excellent education. It is truly a 
pleasure to work with this committee and to represent this wonderful school district and 
community. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Debra M. Noschese, Chair 
Medfield School Committee 



89 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Enrollment Figures 
As of October 1,2004 



Memorial School 



Kindergarten: 
Grade 1: 



233 
247 



Ralph Wheelock School 



Grade 2: 


222 


Grade 3: 


257 


Dale Street School 




Grade 4: 


257 


Grade 5: 


245 



Thomas A. Blake Middle School 



Grade 6 
Grade 7 
Grade 8 



249 
233 
238 



Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 



Grade 9: 
Grade 10 
Grade 1 1 
Grade 12 



225 
242 
181 

220 



TOTAL: 



3049 



90 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the Citizens of Medfield: 

I am pleased to submit the annual report for the Medfield Public Schools for the year 
2004. 

The appropriated budget for FY2005 was $20,698,047. This figure represents an increase 
of approximately 8% over the FY2004 appropriation. To achieve this level of funding the 
town voted a Proposition 2 Vi override in the amount of $657,000. This funding provided 
necessary support to maintain the existing programs provided throughout the district and 
to continue to respond to the increase in enrollment that we are experiencing. 

The October 1, 2004, enrollment was 3049 students. The enrollment by school was: 
Memorial School - 480, Wheelock School - 479, Dale Street School - 502, Blake 
Middle School - 720 and High School 868. 

School administrators and staff continued to work closely with members of the 
Permanent School Planning and Building Committee, local officials, project architects 
and other construction professionals to complete additions and renovations to our 
schools. Memorial School was completed for the opening of school in the fall. Sells- 
Greene Construction was in the process of completing "punch list" items through the first 
months of the school year. The Permanent School Planning and Building Committee 
hosted an open house and rededication ceremony at the school in October. The 
rededication ceremony highlighted the original purpose of the naming of Memorial 
School to recognize the sacrifice of World War II veterans. The newly renovated building 
provides adequate space for all programs and has resulted in a safe and healthy 
environment for the children and staff. 

The construction work at the high school and middle school complex continued during 
2004. Several milestone dates were missed by Alexandra Construction requiring efforts 
to rephrase the planned work schedule. The most significant challenges occurred at the 
Blake Middle School where the gymnasium and cafeteria work was not completed for the 
fall opening of school. The Middle School staff and administration worked diligently to 
manage the difficulties that these schedule changes created. A section of classrooms in 
the existing Blake building was completely renovated and returned to the school for use 
in the fall. Additional parking space and traffic flow improvements were completed in 
September. At the close of 2004 the Permanent Planning and Building Committee was 
working with the contractor to confirm a completion date for the project. 

The 2003-2004 school year was marked by a number of leadership transitions in the 
school district. Wheelock School Principal, Alan Pullman, resigned for the purpose of 



91 



retirement after serving five years as principal in Medfield. Mr. Pullman's position was 
filled by Ms. Patty Gorman who joined us from the Wrentham Public Schools. Dale 
Street School Principal, Richard DeYoung, also resigned for the purpose of retirement 
after nine years employment with the district. Mr. DeYoung was replaced by Ms. Kim 
Cave who has worked with the district as a teacher and curriculum co-director for many 
years. Ms. Cave's appointment as Principal at Dale Street School and the resignation of 
our other co-director for curriculum, Carol Suby, created a vacancy in our central office 
staff. Ms. Pamela Shufro was appointed in November to fill the restructured position of 
Director of Curriculum and Assessment. Ms. Shufro joins us from the Fitchburg Public 
Schools where she served as Director of Reading and Language Arts. Mr. Charles 
Kellner became our new Director of Finance and Operations during the summer. Mr. 
Kellener has prior experience as a town administrator and most recently served as 
Finance Director for the Dedham Public Schools. Mr. Bernard Spillane was promoted to 
fill the vacancy of Plant Management Director. Mr. Spillane has worked in the district in 
our maintenance department for many years. Finally, Mr. Richard Mintzer was appointed 
as the district Food Service Director. Mr. Mintzer joins us after many years of 
employment in the private food service industry. 

The school district continued to make significant progress in the area of curriculum 
review and revision. The Math Study Group completed work aligning our curriculum 
with the Massachusetts State Frameworks and began the process of reviewing new 
textbooks and other instruction materials. Staff also began a comprehensive review of our 
English and language arts curriculum. 

In closing, I would like to express my appreciation to all of the citizens of Medfield for 
their strong support of our educational programs. I would also like to extend my 
appreciation to all of the teachers, parents, support staff, administrators, school 
committee members and volunteers who continue to actively support our educational 
mission. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Robert C. Maguire 
Superintendent 



92 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



STAFF DIRECTORY 



k k k k Je 



CENTRAL OFFICE 



Maguire, Robert C, BA,MEd 
Kellner, Charles L., BA, MBA 
Shufro, Pamela, BA, MA,EdD 
Leader, Kathleen 
Bennotti, Beverly 
Floser, Anna 
Hirtle, Patricia 
Kavanaugh, Mary 
Cahill, Cynthia 
Sullivan, Colleen 



Superintendent of Schools 
Director/ Finance & Operations 
Director/Curriculum & Assessment 
Administrative Assistant to Superintendent 
Secretary to the Superintendent 
Secretary to Dir/Finance & Operations 
Accounts Payable/Bookkeeper 
Payroll Officer 

Secretary/Office of Curric. & Assessment 
Mail Transfer 



93 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Keough, Andrew 


Principal 


BA, Roger Williams College 

MSped, MArt, Framingham State College 


2003 


Gibbs, David 


Dn/Students 


BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1970 


Nunes, Kathleen 


Dn/Academics 


BA, Framingham State College 

MA. Boston College 

MEd, University of MA, Boston 


2001 


Davidson, Sandy 


Secretary 




1988 


Ingram, Maryjean 


Secretary 




1999 


Boyer, Laura 


Secretary 




2000 


Batts, Maura 


For Lang(LOA) 


BA, Middlebury College 

MEd, University of Massachusetts 


1993 


Bauer, Carol 


Wellness 


BS, Springfield College 


1999 


Berry, Orla 


Science 


BS,USG,MEd University of 
Massachusetts/Boston 


2004 


Bertucci, Edward 


Science 


BS, University of Massachusetts/Amherst 
MNS, Worcester Polytechnic Institute 


2004 


Blessington, Patricia 


Business 


BS, California State/Long Beach 
MA, Cambridge College 


1998 


Boucher, Richard 


Network Administrator 


1997 


Brophy, Kathleen 


Wellness/PE 


AB, Boston College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


2001 


Bruemmer, Paul 


Foreign Lang 


BA, St. Mary's University of MN 
MA, University of St. Thomas 


2001 


Buckley, Sarah 


Foreign Lang 


BA, Bowdin College 
Masters,Middlebury College 


2000 


Burk, Kristie 


English 


BA,Providence College 
MEd,University of Massachusetts/Boston 


2004 


Cochran, James 


Mathematics 


BA,Boston College 
MBA,Dartmouth College 
MEd, Harvard University 


2004 


Coutinho, Paul 


Wellness/PE 


BS, Southern Connecticut State 

University 
MS, Northeastern University 


2002 


Cowell, Susan 


Wellness 


BS, Springfield College 


1984 


Curran, Jane 


Library Assistant 


2004 


Delery, Andrew 


Mathematics 


BA, Providence College 


2001 


DeSorgher, Richard 


Social Studies 


BA, University of Mass/Amherst 
MA, University of Mass/Boston 


1976 


Dinno, Dalia 


Science(LOA) 


BS, University of Toronto 
MAT, Simmons College 


2001 


Duffy, Gail 


English 


BA, Stonehill College 

MAT, Bridgewater State College 

MSPC, Clark University 


2001 


Dugan, Ellen 


English 


BA, Mt. St. Mary College 


1987 



94 



Name 



Position 





Medfield 


Education 


Appointment 


BA,James Madison University 


2004 


BA, Providence College 


2001 


MAT, Simmons College 




BS, Boston University 


1997 


MS, Suffolk University 




BS,MS, University of Illinois 


2004 


BA, Boston College 


1999 


MEd, Cambridge College 




BA, University of MA, Boston 


2000 


MAT, Tufts University 




BA, SUNY/Binghamton 


2004 


MST,SUNY/Plattsburg 





Dunn, Jonathan 
Emerson, Kathleen 



Foort, Elizabeth 
Gait, Luanne 

Garcia-Rangel, Mary 

Goodrow, Monique 

Goss, Anne 
Green, Nancy 

Hamilton, Barbara 

Hardy, Adele 

Hawkins, Eileen 

Heller, David 

Irwin, Ross 

Jones, Kate 
Joseph, Vincent 

Kinch, Terry 

Kirby Jonathan 

Kraemer, Michael 

Kramer, David 

Kryzanek, Carol 

Lindstrom, Paul 

Malchodie, Anne 
Mandosa, Frank 

McDermott, Janet 



Mathematics 
Social Studies 



Flanagan, Jacqueline Math(LOA) 



Orchestra 
Mathematics 

English 

Foreign Lang 

Library Assistant 
Science 

Science 

Consumer & 
Family Science 
Foreign Lang 

Writing Center 

Mathematics 

Art 

Social Studies 

Science Tech/ 

Computers 

Wellness/AD 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Science 

Social Studies 

English 
English 



English 



1998 
BA, Colgate University 2003 

MAT, Simmons College 

BA, Wheaton College 1 986 

MEd, Cambridge College 
BS, Frammgham State College 1981 

BA, University of Maryland 2003 

MAT, Simmons College 

BA, University of California,Santa Cruz 2000 

MA, Emerson College 

BEd, Leeds University, England 1992 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BFA, Massachusetts College of Art 2003 

BS, University of Bridgeport 1 990 

MS, Fitchburg State College 

BS, SUNY at Brockport 1994 

BS, University of Bridgeport 1 977 

MS, Cambridge College 

BA, College of the Holy Cross 1 993 

MAT, Bridgewater State College 

MME, Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

BS,BA, Georgetown University 2004 

JD, Georgetown University 

BA, Bridgewater State College 1988 

MA, University of Massachusetts 

BA, University of Utah 200 1 

MEd, Framingham State College 

BA, Boston College 2004 

BA, St. Anselm College 2002 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BA, Regis College 1971 

MAT, Boston College 



95 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



McLain, Lynne 


Science 


BS,MST, Boston College 


1999 


McNamara, Deborah 


Library Assistant (LOA) 


1999 


McManus, Sarah 


Foreign Lang 


BA, University of Massachusetts/ Amherst 


2004 


Meaney, Donna 


Technology Assistant 


1993 


Monroe, Aileen 


English 


BA, Nazareth College 
of Rochester 


2002 


Morin, Donna 


Foreign Lang 


BA, College of New Rochelle 


2003 


Nickerson, Mark 


Social Studies 


BA, Gettysburg College 

Masters, Framingham State College 

MEd, Worcester State College 


1995 


Noble, Judith 


Science 


BS, University of NH 

MEd, Worcester State College 


1974 


Olsen, Douglas 


Dir of Music 


BMusic, University of Massachusetts 
Masters, New England Conservatory 


1993 


Panciocco, John 


SocStudies/TV 


BS, University of Maine 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1998 


Perm, Mark 


Social Studies 


BA, Mt. Ida College 
MEd, Harvard University 


2001 


Power, Christine 


Social Studies 


BA, University of Massachusetts 
MEd, Harvard University 


1997 


Pratt, Suzanne 


Science 


BS, University of Massachusetts 
MS, Central Connecticut State College 


1971 


Priovolos, Elaine 


Social Studies 


BA, Hunter College 
MEd, Boston College 


2003 


Rotella, Meghan 


Art 


BA, Sacred Heart University 
MFA, Boston University 


2003 


Ruggaber, Gordon 


Science 


BS, Clarkson University 
MS, Syracuse University 
PhD, MIT 


2003 


Sabra, Ann Marie 


English 


BA, Worcester State College 
MEd, Framingham State College 


1995 


Safer, Jessica 


Mathematics 


BA, Assumption College 


2002 


Salka, Martin 


Permanent Substitute 
Lunchroom Assistant 


2002 


Schmidt, Joanne 


Librarian 


BS, Framingham State College 
MLS, Simmons College 
MA, Emerson College 


2000 


Shapiro, Richard 


Science 


BS, Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
MS, Northeastern University 


1981 


Sparrow, Maria 


Foreign Lang 


BA, University of Massachusetts/ Amherst 


2004 


Stevens, Nicholas 


Wellness 


BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1995 


Stockbridge, Gary 


Social Studies 


BA, Framingham State 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1970 


Tasi, Tracy 


Foreign Lang 


BA, Boston College 


2002 


Tobiasson, Susan 


Art 


AA, Lasell College 

BA, Southern Connecticut State University 


1989 



96 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Toubman, Ellen 


Foreign Lang 


BA, Connecticut College 
MEd, Harvard University 


2002 


Whitmore, Miranda 


English/Assist 


BA, Williams College 
MEd, Harvard University 


2004 


Wilmot, Jessica 


English 


Bachelors, University of New Hampshire 
Masters, University of Mass/Boston 


2003 


Woods, Jane 


Mathematics 


BA, MAT Bridgewater State College 


1996 


Wren-Burgess, Bonnie 


English 


BA, Boston University 
MAT, Simmons College 


2003 



97 



THOMAS A. BLAKE MIDDLE SCHOOL 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
A ppointment 



Mongiello, Margaret 
Hodne, Gordon 

McHugh, Elizabeth 
Brown, Jo- Anne 
Skerry, Sharon 
Ambrose, Mary 
Ammon, Robert 
Ayers, Sandra 
Brackett, Kenneth 

Buckley, Susan 
Cohen, Wendy 
Craig, Kathleen 

Dalpe, Cynthia 

Dawson, Sarah 

Demeritt, Deborah 

Dexter, Ryan 

Doolan, Constance 

Farroba, Joseph 

Gagne, Ian 
Gonzalez, Heather 
Gow, Michael 
Greenhill, Margaret 

Guarino, Veronique 

Guditus, Steve 

Gumas, Marissa 
Haycock, Jonathan 
Heim, Jason 



Principal 

Dean of Students 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Secretary 

English 

Science 

English 

Physical Education 

Teacher Assistant 

Library Assistant 

Science 

Mathematics 

Foreign Language 

Science/Reading 

Science 

Music/Band 

Mathematics 

Health/PE 

Reading 
Foreign Lang 
Social Studies 
Science 

Foreign Lang 

Social Studies 

Mathematics 

Librarian 

Science 



BS,MA, Bowling Green State U. 

BA, Barrington College 

MEd, University of Mass/Boston 



BS,University of Connecticut 
BS,MEd, East Stroudsburg State 
BS, MEd, Boston State College 
BS,Westfield State 



BS, Simmons College 
BA, Webster College 
MA, Cambridge College 
BA, Worcester State College 
MEd, Cambridge College 
BA, Ohio Wesleyan University 
MA, University of Colorado 
BS, University of Connecticut 
Masters, Cambridge College 
Bachelor of Music,University 

of Massachusetts 
BS, Bradley University 
MEd, Cambridge College 
BS, Boston State College 
MEd, Cambridge College 
BS, Boston University 
BA, Oberlin College 
BS, University of Wisconsin 
BA, Middlebury College 
MEd, Lesley University 
BA, University of Massachusetts/ 
Amherst 

BA, Hamilton College 
MEd, Harvard Graduate School 

of Education 
BA, Arcadia University 
MEd, Lesley University 
BS, Boston University 
MEd, Boston University 
BS, SUNY, Albany 
MAT, Simmons College 



1997 
1966 

1998 
2004 
2001 
2004 
1967 
1995 
1997 

1998 
1988 
1981 

1986 

1997 

1974 

2000 

2004 

1978 

2000 
2004 
2001 
2002 

2004 

2002 

2001 
1998 
2002 



98 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Hellerstein, Seth 


Social Studies 


Hoffman, Janice 


English 


Ibrahim, Susan 


Foreign Language 


Jalkut, Maryann 


Rdng/Soc. Studies 


Kirby, Ann 


Mathematics 


Krause, Dorothy 


Social Studies 


Lombardi, Patricia 


Mathematics 


Manning, Deborah 


Social Studies 


Manning, Kristin 


Foreign Language 


McConnell, Ellen 


English 


Miller, Martha 


English/LA 


Nelson, Carol 


English 


O'Neil, Joyce 


Physical Education 


Palumbo, John 


Mathematics 


Parsons, John 


Science 


Porter-Fahey, Loretta 


Health Education 


Potts, Eve 


Consumer & Family 




Science 


Rabinowitz, Kristen 


English 


Ramos, Paul 


Science 


Russell, Ellen 


Technology Assistant 


Shiff, Mary 


Art 


Shorter, Jeffrey 


Science 


Shluger, Lisa 


Science 


Smith, Kristen 


Social Studies(LOA) 



BA, Beloit College 1999 

MEd, University of VT 

CAS, Trinity College, VT 

BA, Emmanuel College 

MA,University of Madrid, Spain 

BS, Boston University 

MEd,Boston College 

BS, Framingham State College 

BS, MEd, Boston College 

BA, Framingham State College 

MA, Cambridge College 

BA, St. Mary's College 

MS, University of Notre Dame 

BA, Hamilton College 

MEd, Lesley University 

BA, University of Vermont 

MAT, Quinnipiac College 

BA, Marymount College 

MA, Northeastern University 

BA, Framingham State College 

MEd, State College at Boston 

BA, University of Massachusetts 

MA, Boston College 

BS, University of Wisconsin 

BA, Holy Cross 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BA, College of Wooster 

BS, Framingham State College 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BS, University of Maine 

Masters, Cambridge College 

BS, UCLA 

MEd, Framingham State 

BA, University of New Hampshire 2003 

MAT, Simmons College 

BA, Ithaca College 

MS, Dowling College 



1973 

2001 

1987 
2003 
1993 

1994 

2002 

2003 

1992 

1988 

1978 

1993 
2004 

1998 



1980 



2000 



2001 



BFA, Massachusetts College of 

Art 
Longterm Substitute 
BA, University of Pennsylvania 
MS, Antioch New England 

University 
BA,MAT, Connecticut College 



2001 
1996 

2004 
2002 



2000 



99 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Sperling, Keri 


Mathematics 


BA, Bridgewater State College 
MEd, Lesley University 


2000 


Standring, Nancy 


Library Assistant 




1992 


Sullivan, John 


Social Studies 


BA,MA, Northeastern University 


2004 


Sullivan, Wendy 


Technology Assistant 




2002 


Taliaferro, Travis 


Social Studies 


BA,MEd, Plymouth State College 


2001 


Tasker, Geraldine 


Social Studies 


BA, Our Lady of the Elms College 
MEd, Lesley College 


1986 


Vaughn, Nathaniel 


Mathematics 


BA, Trinity College 
MEd, Lesley College 
Endicott College 


1998 


Walker, Doris 


English 


BA, University of Maine 
MAT, Bridgewater State College 


1987 


Wroten, Theresa 


Music/Chorus 


BMusic, Boston Conservatory 


2000 


Zaia, Diane 


Mathematics 


AS, Westbrook College 
BS, Northeastern University 
MS, University of Rhode Island 


1995 



100 



DALE STREET SCHOOL 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Cave, Kim 


Principal 


Moon, Martha 
Englehardt, Nancy 
Abner, Deborah 


Secretary 
Secretary 
Librarian 


Belmont, Katherine 
Boyle, Veronica 


Grade 4 
Grade 4(LOA) 


Bumham, Elizabeth 


Grade 4 


Carey, Pauline 


Health/PE 


Cauldwell, Mary 


Reading 


Cook, Lynne 


Grade 4 


Crable, Heidi 
Curran, Kathleen 


Grade 5 
Grade 4 


Deveno, Nancy 


Art 


Dixon, Emily 


Grade 5 


Dodge, Maureen 


Grade 4 


Douglas, Michael 


Grade 4 


Driscoll, Joan 
Fromen, Deborah 
Harrington, Lauren 
Harris, Elizabeth 
Hobel, Olivia 
Kirby, Joia 


Lunchroom Assistant 
Technology Assistant 
Grade 4 

Lunchroom Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 
Grade 4(LOA) 


Kristof, Ann 
Lowere, Julie 
Mason, Michael 


Grade 4 
Grade 5 
Grade 5 


McKechnie, Claire 


Grade 5 



BS, Framingham State 
MS, Boston University 



BFA, College of New Rochelle 
MA, University of Louisville 
MS, Simmons College 
BS, Framingham State College 
BA, Assumption College 
MEd,Bridgewater State College 
BA, University of Maine 
MAT, Simmons College 
BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 
BS, Bridgewater State College 
MEd, Framingham State College 
BA, Springfield College 
MEd, Lesley University 
BS, University of Maine 
BS, University of Mass/Amherst 
MBA, Northeastern University 
BSA, Mass. College of Art 
MSAE,Mass. College of Art 
BA, Holy Cross 
MEd,Lesley University 
BA, Sonoma State University 
MA, National University 
BS, Stonehill College 
MEd, Cambridge College 



BA, Notre Dame College 



BA, Trinity College 
MEd, Lesley College 
BS, Framingham State College 
BS, Indiana State University 
BS, Northeastern University 
MEd, Bridgewater State University 
BA, Boston College 
MEd, Cambridge College 



1987 

1992 
1997 
2004 



1971 
1999 

1999 

1992 

1974 

1999 

1994 

2000 

1993 

2000 

2004 

1995 

1997 
2001 
1967 
1997 
2004 
1996 

1974 
2004 
1989 

1977 



101 



Medfield 



Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Nelson, Laura 


Grade 5 


BA, University of Massachsuetts 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1972 


O'Connell, Laura 


Grade 5 


BS, MA, Simmons College 


2000 


Olson, Janice 


Grade 4 


BS, Boston State College 


1973 


Oxholm, Barbara 


Music 


BM, University of Lowell 

MM, New England Conservatory 


1999 


Pendleton, Anne 


Reading 


BS, University of Southern Maine 
MA, University of Lowell 


1995 


Pope, William 


Physical Education 


Associate, Dean College 
BS, Springfield College 


1977 


Porro, Shannon 


Grade 5 


BS, MEd, Northeastern University 


2003 


Ramos, Beth 


Grade 4 


BA, Boston College 


2001 


Reynolds, Mairi 


Physical Education 


BS, Boston University 


2001 


Sager, Bethany 


Grade 5 


BA, Mount Holyoke College 
MEd, Framingham State College 


1996 


Sutton, Clare 


Grade 4 


BS, Framingham State College 


2004 


Thornton, Maria 


Library Assistant 




2004 


White, Joseph 


Grade 5 


BS, Northeastern University 
MEd, University of Massachusetts 


1992 


Woodman, Susan 


Grade 5 


BA, Boston University 


1993 



102 



RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Gorman, Patricia 


Principal 


Naughton, Karen 
Monahan, Luanne 
Allyn, Cynthia 


Secretary 
Secretary 
Grade 2 


Braverman, Nancy 
Busconi, Elizabeth 


Math/Lunch Assistant 
Grade 2 


Carey, Ann 
Centore, Gwenneth 
Cowell, Thomas 
Cyr, Chelsea 


Grade 2 

Teacher Assistant 
Physical Education 
Grade 2 


Deschenes, Noelle 
Dunlea, Cheryl 


Grade 2 
Grade 3 


Featherman, Nancy 


Grade 2 


Fine, Madeline 
Frewald, Dorothy 
Grant, Ann 
Guthrie, Kristen 


Art 

Lib/Tech Assistant 

Grade 2 

Grade 3(LOA) 


Harlow, Kathleen 


Grade 3 


Interrante, Janice 
Kuehl, James 


Grade 3 
Grade 3 


Landry, Joan 
Larensen, Cynthia 


Grade 3 
Grade 3 


Leach, Kerry 
Lynn, Rachel 


Grade 3 
Grade 3 


Marsette, Elizabeth 


Grade 2 


McCabe, Karen 


Health 


Mitchell, Lori 


Grade 2(LOA) 


Morris, Regina 


Grade 2 



BA, Westfield State 
Masters, Wheelock College 
CAGS, Emmanuel College 



BS,Ed Lesley College 

MS, Lesley College 

CAS, Harvard Graduate School 

AB, Boston University 

MEd, Framingham State College 

BSEd, Framingham State College 

BA, University of Texas 
BA, St. Lawrence University 
MEd, Boston College 
BA, Boston College 
BA, Boston College 

BA, University of Massachusetts 

MEd, Lesley College 

BA, University of Massachusetts 



2004 



1985 
2002 
1970 



2004 
1984 

1971 
1985 
1970 
2003 

2001 
1986 

1972 

2001 
1993 
1993 

1997 



BA, University of Massachusetts 

BA, University of Vermont 

MEd, Boston University 

BA, Stonehill College 2001 

MS, Wheelock College 

BA, Marywood University 1986 

BA, University of Arizona 1997 

MAT, Simmons College 

BA, Boston College 2002 

BS, Springfield College 1970 

MEd, Lesley College 

BA, Bridgewater State College 2003 

BS, North Adams State College 1 997 

M,SpecEd, Framingham State College 

BA, Hamilton College 200 1 

BS, Purdue University 1996 

MEd, Bridgewater State University 
BA, University of Colorado 2000 

MAT, Simmons College 
BS, MEd, Framingham State 1976 

MEd, Boston College 



103 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Myers, Judith 


Reading 


Newton, Debra 


Grade 3 


Parker, Susan 


Art 


Parmenter, Dorothy 


Music 


Pope, Susan 


Librarian 


Sheehan, Nicole 


Grade 3 


Silver, Andrea 


Grade 2 


Slason, Michael 
Sullivan, Nicole 


Physical Education 
Grade 3 


Watson, Erin 


Grade 3 


Weisenfeld, Susan 
Wile, Jacqueline 


Math/Lunch Assistant 
Reading Assistant 



BA, Clark University 1 998 

MS, Long Island University 

BA, MEd, University of New 1 996 

Hampshire 

BS, Skidmore College 1978 

MEd, Lesley College 

BA, Marymount College 1978 

MEd, Lesley College 

BA, University of Vermont 1 979 

MLS, University of Illinois 

BSEd,Bridgewater State College 1 994 

MSEd, Wheelock College 

BA, American University 200 1 

MEd, Lesley College 

BA, New Mexico Highlands Univ. 1 986 

BA, University of Rochester 200 1 

MEd, Boston University 

BA, University of New Hampshire 1995 

MEd, Lesley College 

2004 
1999 



104 



MEMORIAL SCHOOL 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Levine, Barbara 


Principal 


BS, Northeastern University 
MEd, Boston State College 


2001 


Driscoll, Marcia 


Secretary 




1989 


Policella, Lynn 


Secretary 




1998 


Callahan, Jamee 


Grade 1 


BA, Framingham State College 


2003 


Colantoni, Juliana 


Grade 1 


BS, Wheelock College 


1991 


• 




MEd, Lesley University 




Cooney, Susan 


Reading 


BA, Tufts University 
MA, Simmons College 
MS, Wheelock College 


2001 


Cromn, Susan 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Crowell, Deirdre 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


DiMarzo, Barbara 


Grade 1 


BS, Boston State College 
MA, Lesley College 


1990 


Dragotakes, Donna 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Estes, Kimberly 


Teacher Assistant 




2001 


Fechtelkotter, Caroline 


Library Assistant 




2003 


Grace, Herbert 


Physical Education 


BS, Keene State College 
MA, Cambridge College 


1992 


Graham, Karen 


Physical Education 


BS, Boston University 


1989 


Green, Susan 


Kindergarten 


BA, University of Massachusetts/ 
Amherst 


1991 


Groden, Randie 


Librarian 


BA, University of Maryland 
MLS, Rutgers University 


2001 


Guilbert, Alison 


Grade 1 


BS, University of Vermont2001 
MEd, Lesley University 




Guilmette, Gail 


Kindergarten 


BA, Our Lady of the Elms College 


1988 


Hanken, Patricia 


Lunchroom Assistant 




2003 


Hedberg, Marie 


Kindergarten 


BA, Boston College 
MA, Lesley College 


1999 


Herring, Heather 


Grade 1 


BA, Assumption College 
MA, Lesley University 


2001 


Jones, Deborah 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 


Karakozian Stephanie 


Grade 1 


BA, Assumption College 
Masters, Simmons College 


2003 


Kinsman, Mary 


Teacher Assistant 




1980 


Maalouf, Raymonde 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Matson, Kathryn 


Technology Assistant 




1997 


McAvoy, Susan 


Kindergarten 


BS, MEd, Framingham State 
College 


2000 


McNicholas, Maura 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Mulock, Louise 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 



105 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
A ppointment 



Nicholson, Margaret Grade 1 



Nickerson, Jeninne 
O'Brien, Teri 


Kindergarten 
Instructional Technology 


O'Connor-Fischer 
Oppel, Heidi 
Paget, Christine 


Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 
Grade 1 


Pendergast, Marie 


Grade 1 


Pollock, Allison 


Grade 1 


Ravinski, Kathleen 


Grade 1 


Reardon, Suzanne 
Roman, Jennifer 


Reading Assistant 
Kdgn&Teacher Assistant 


Ruggiero, David 


Music 


Singer, Laura 


Reading 


Trasher, Andrea 


Grade 1 



BA, Newton College of the 
Sacred Heart 
MEd, Lesley College 
BS, Bridgewater State 
BA, National College of the 

Sacred Heart 
MEd, Northeastern University 



BS, Framingham State College 

MEd, Lesley College 

BA, University of MA 

MEd, University of MA 

MSpEd, Framingham State College 

BA, University of Vermont 

MEd, Lesley College 

BA, Wheaton College 

MAT, Simmons College 

BA, Smith College 
MEd, Boston College 
BS, Bryant College 
Masters,Central Connecticut 

State University 
MEd, Lesley University 
BS, St. Bonaventure University 
MS, University of Bridgeport 
BSBusAdmin, Northeastern 

University 
MEd, Bridgewater State College 



1978 



1998 
1984 



2003 
1998 
1990 

1998 



1992 

2001 

2002 
2003 

2002 



1990 



1994 



106 



PUPIL SERVICES 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


McArdle, Kathleen 


Director 


BS, Fitchburg State College 
MS, Simmons College 
MBA, Boston University 


1995 


Lowd, Diane 


Secretary 




1998 


Mitchell, Kim 


Secretary 




2000 


Birkett, Janet 


Secretary 




2000 


Baine, Carol 


Guidance 


BA, University of Pittsburgh 
MEd, Boston University 
CAGS, Boston State College 


1972 


Allen, Tracy 


Guidance 


BA, Vassar College 
MA, Boston College 


2004 


Anelauskas, Mary 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Ballou, Katherine 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Barczi, Leann 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Beath, Maureen 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 


Bernard, Michele 


Teacher Assistant 




2003 


Bockhorst, Kathleen 


Guidance 


BA, Bates College 
MA, Boston College 


2004 


Bonney, Douglas 


Teacher Assistant 




2001 


Borona, Stacey 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Providence College 
MS, Wheelock College 


2000 


Bosh, Maryellen 


Psychologist 


BA, St. Anselm College 
MA, Tufts University 


1998 


Brown, Judith 


Teacher Assistant 




1992 


Cannon, Amy 


Teacher Assistant 




2003 


Chen, Joy 


Occupational Therapist 


BA, Oberlin College 
MS, Boston University 


1994 


DeGeorge, Sally 


Integrated Preschool 


BS, SUNY/Geneseo 
MSEd, Boston College 


2004 


Donalds, Elizabeth 


Psychologist 


BFA, University of Colorado 


2000 






MS,CAGS, Northeastern University 


Dorson, Michelle 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Dunn, Jean 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Fairbanks, Robin 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Frauenberger, Gretchen 


School Physician 






Fuglestad, Joanne 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 


Ghantous, Carolyn 


Teacher Assistant 




2001 


Gordon, Beverly 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Pottsdam State University 
MSEd, The College of St. Rose 


1993 


Grace, Paula 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Gross, Susan 


Inclusion Coordinator 


BA, Colgate University 
MEd, Framingham State 


2003 


Guglietta, Maureen 


Teacher Assistant 




1987 



107 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Hobel, Olivia 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Hollenbeck, Jill 


Psychologist 


BA, Oswego State University 
MEd, CAGS, University of Mass/ 
Boston 


2001 


Ikoma, Michael 


Teacher Assistant 




2002 


Johnson, Susan 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Northwestern University 
MEd, Boston University 
JD, Suffolk University 


2003 


Knowles, Marcia 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Krah, Kerrie 


Speech/Language 


BS, Marquette University 
Master of Arts, Hofstra University 


2000 


Lahaie, Rebecca 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Lavallee, Susan 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Lesley College 


2002 


Lavelle, Patricia 


Speech/ Language 


BA, Marywood College 
MEd, Northeastern University 


1994 


Lindgren, Bernadette 


Permanent Substitute 




2004 


MacGillivray, Michael 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Machado, John 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Mahoney, Mary 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Wheelock College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1995 


Mandosa, Heather 


Guidance 


BA, St. Anslem College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


2001 


Marenghi, Matthew 


Guidance 


BA, University of Massachusetts/ 

Lowell 
MEd, Boston University 


2002 


McLaughlin, Nancy 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Mello, Felicia 


Teacher Assistant 




1989 


Moores, Andrea 


Paraprofessional 




2004 


Muir, Connie 


Teacher Assistant 




1992 


Mullen, Patricia 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Stonehill College 

MEd, Framingham State College 


2001 


Murray, Jill 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Musmon, Sari 


Guidance 


BS, University of Massachusetts 
MEd, Boston University 


2000 


Newman, Stacey 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Nickerson, Alexandra 


Teacher Assistant 




1976 


Nilson, Holly 


Inclusion Coord/S&Lang 


BA, University of Massachusetts 
MA, Washington State University 


1987 


Ormbeg, Erik 


Guidance 


BA, Ithaca College 
MEd, Suffolk University 


1998 


0' Sullivan, Barbara 


Teacher Assistant 




2002 


0' Sullivan, Mary 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Providence College 


2002 


Patch, Mary 


Nurse 


BSN, University of Wisconsin 


1995 


Preikszas, Mary 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Frostburg State College 


1996 


Pugatch, Diane 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Boston University 


1995 



MS,Ed, Lesley College 



108 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Read, Susan 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Riccio, Julia 


Speech/Language 


BA, Bates College 


2000 






MS, Teachers College, Columbia Univ. 


Robinson, Judith 


Learning Specialist 


AB, Boston University 
Masters, Newton College of 
the Sacred Heart 


1988 


Rollins, Patricia 


Teacher Assistant 




2003 


Samaha, Amanda 


Guidance 


BA, MEd, University of New 
Hampshire 


2004 


Samson, Susan 


Nurse 


BSN, Lowell State College 
MS, Boston University 


1999 


Scheld, Nancy 


Teacher Assistant 




1997 


Schiemer, Nancy 


Nurse 


BSN, University of Bridgeport 
MA, New York University 


2003 


Schmidt, Marguerite 


Teacher Assistant 




2003 


Scollins, Suzanne 


Teacher Assistant 




2003 


Sherman, Rebecca 


Teacher Assistant 




2002 


Singer, Margaret 


Occupational Therapist 


BA, SUNY/Oneonta 
MA, Adelphi University 
MS, Boston University 


1998 


Snyder, Trinka 


Psychologist 


BA, MS, University of 
Pennsylvania 


2002 






MBA, George Washington University 






CAGS, University of Massachusetts 


Sockol, Dawn 


Case Manager 


BA,MEd, Michigan State Univ. 
CAGS, Rhode Island College 


1985 


Speroni, Richard 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Strekalovsky, Elisabeth 


Psychologist 


BA, Middlebury College 

MEd, Lesley College 

MEd, CAGS, University of MA 


1998 


Sullivan, Barbara 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Framingham State College 
MEd, Boston State College 


2003 


Telia, Nancy 


Nurse 


BSN, Boston College 


2002 


Thomas, Annie 


Teacher Assistant 




2003 


Thompson, Kathleen 


Nurse 


BS, Salem State College 
MS, Boston College 


1997 


Thoren, Jessica 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Tonelli, Noelle 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Triest, Sherry 


Teacher Assistant 




2002 


Tubndy, Susan 


Teacher Assistant 




2003 


Typadis, Angela 


Integrated Preschool 


BA, Stonehill College 

MEd, Bridgewater State College 


1989 


Wall, Heidi 


Speech/Language 


BA, Boston College 
MS, Boston University 


2000 


Walunas, Kathryn 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Boston College 


1991 


Wolf, Airin 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Zrike, Sara 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 



109 



FOOD SERVICES 



Mintzer, Richard 

Miller, Terry 

Allen, Nancy 

Anderson, Ruth 

Andrews, Donna 

Brown, Angela 

Centola, Denise 

Clark, Heather 

David, Denise 

DeRoche, Nancy 

Evans, Sandra (Manager) 

Gillis, Julie 

Grieve, Suzanne 

Hill, Mary 

Hughes, Janice 

Jones, Christina (Manager) 

Konevich, Stephanie (Manager) 

LaPlante, Laurie (Manager) 

Manning, Linda 

McCarthy, Hazel 

Mullen, Joanne 

Nelson, Carol (Manager) 

Norton, Nancy 

Szylkonis, Fran 



Director/ Food Services 

Secretary 

Blake Middle School 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

High School 

Dale Street School 

High School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

High School 

Dale Street School 

Middle School 

High School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Blake Middle School 

Memorial School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Dale Street School 

Memorial School 

Blake Middle School 

High School 

Dale Street School 

Blake Middle School 



110 



PLANT MANAGEMENT 



Spillaine, Bernard 

Brown, Wayne 

Burton, Linda 

Comeau, Joseph 

Currier, Richard (Head Custodian) 

Floser, Ronald 

Frazier, Matthew 

Glassman, Barry 

Guy, Steven 

Hinkley, Paul 

Howland, George (Head Custodian) 

Johnson, Donald (Head Custodian) 

Johnson, Michael 

Kadehjian, Robert (Head Custodian) 

MacPherson, John(Head Custodian) 

Martin, Henry 

McCarthy, William 

Murphy, Brian 

Nicolazzo, Anthony 

Nonan, Paul 

Quayle, Thomas 

Rogers, Thomas 

Stavris, Kenneth 

Vogel, Keith 

Volpicelli, Brian 



Dir/Plant Management 
Blake Middle School 
Blake Middle School 
Dale Street School 
Dale Street School 
High School 
Memorial School 
Maintenance 
Blake Middle School 
Central Office 
Memorial School 
High School 
Middle School 
Blake Middle School 
Ralph Wheelock School 
Dale Street School 
Maintenance Technician 
High School 
Blake Middle School 
Ralph Wheelock School 
Maintenance 
Memorial School 
High School 
Memorial School 
Ralph Wheelock School 



111 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND 

OPERATIONS 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with great pleasure that I submit to you and the citizens of Medfield the 2004 Annual 
Report as the Director of Finance and Operations. While the period from January 1 
through December 31, 2004 was marked by transition, I am confident that the financial 
and operational components of the Medfield Public Schools are well-positioned to 
continue to contribute to the excellence of the system. Having assumed my duties prior 
to the beginning of the 2004-2005 school year, I have greatly appreciated the support and 
assistance I have been given which has greatly eased this transition. 

In the area of building maintenance, the School Committee and District Administration 
continued to address the capital improvement and maintenance needs of the facilities. 
Funds are budgeted and expended annually to continue the process of replacing 
carpeting, classroom furniture and repainting interior spaces as needed. In addition, 
Town Meeting allocated the sum of $55,000 to provide needed repairs and improvements 
to the rest room facilities throughout the Dale Street School. These funds have been 
utilized to improve the ventilation, update the fixtures and enhance our ability to maintain 
these areas. The remaining component of this project - to provide handicapped- 
accessible adult toilet facilities on the first floor - is anticipated to be completed during 
the first half of 2005. 

The five-year capital budget is updated annually. The expertise that the newly-appointed 
Director of Plant Management, Bernie Spillane, has provided during this endeavor has 
been invaluable. This planning and management tool provides a systematic analysis of 
the capital needs of the system and its facilities. The capital plan continues to focus on 
the Dale Street and Wheelock Schools, and attempts to provide a realistic assessment of 
our building and maintenance requirements within the context of fiscal realities. Through 
this analytic process, it has become clear that in order to provide the appropriate learning 
environment while concurrently preserving our financial resources, it is important that we 
implement a systematic process of improving the ventilation systems within our buildings 
and replacing the single-paned windows which exist at these buildings. 

In the area of student transportation, the District's continuing enrollment growth 
necessitated the addition of one bus. We now utilize a fleet of 21 busses (19 full-size, 
one mini-bus and one half bus). In 2005, we plan to take advantage of a temporary lull 
in anticipated enrollment growth to undertake a comprehensive examination of our 
school bus transportation system. This examination is anticipated to include a 
determination of the best way to use the comprehensive and timely data provided by the 



112 



town's Geographic Information System (GIS), as well as a determination of how to 
incorporate this data with appropriate transportation routing software systems. 

Our school lunch program continues to provide appropriate and healthy meals to our 
students. Richard Mintzer commenced his duties as Food Sendee Director in the fall. He 
has taken the initiative in determining the preferences of our customers in menu options 
while continuing to provide nutritionally-balanced meals. In accordance with 
Massachusetts General Laws, we are continuing the process of identifying and allocating 
the direct and indirect expenses of the food service operation. We are confident that we 
will be able to accomplish these enhancements while maintaining the financial viability 
of the program which operates distinctly from the appropriated budget. 

The budget process in 2004 culminated in the adoption of a budget for the Medfield 
Public Schools of $20,698,047. This represented an increase of SI, 536,285 or 8.02% 
over the sum provided the precious year. We are grateful to the town for approving the 
operational override to Proposition 2 Vi which enabled this budget to go forward. In 
recognition of the anticipated temporary lull in expected enrollment growth in 2005- 
2006, the ongoing budget process has focused on addressing the District's ongoing needs 
while maintaining excellence within the confines of Proposition 2 V 2 . The District and 
building-based administrative team have been working diligently in preparing a budget 
blueprint that incorporates the direction provided by the School Committee. 

In closing, I would like to express my sincere appreciation to my co-workers and staff for 
the warm welcome they provided me upon my arrival in Medfield and for their continued 
exemplary assistance. I look forward with confidence to addressing the opportunities and 
meeting the challenges which lie ahead. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles L. Kellner 

Director of Finance and Operations 



113 



REPORT OF THE AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY HIGH 

SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As principal of the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School, I respectfully submit this annual 
report for the school year ending December 3 1 , 2004. 

The official enrollment for the high school for the 2003-04 school year was 829 students. 
There were 179 graduates in the class of 2004. Of these 95% have gone on to further 
their studies at post-secondary institutions of learning. Among many others, some of the 
schools accepting our students included: Boston College, Cornell, The Citadel, 
Providence, Northeastern, Seton Hall, Syracuse, and Villanova. 

Our year was marked by great achievement on the part of many of our students. For 
example, 46 members, roughly one quarter of the graduating class, were also members of 
the National Honor Society. These students not only excelled academically, but met 
rigorous demands in the areas of service, leadership, and character. Karen Miller and 
Kate Berlent were selected as Honor Essayists by the high school faculty and were 
presented with their awards after their speeches at the graduation ceremony on June 6, 
2004. In addition, local resident, Dr. "Pete" Stagg was honored at Senior Class Day 
ceremonies for his lifetime achievements. His plaque was placed with those of other 
famous graduates on the wall of the Medfield High School Hall of Excellence. 

This year we were proud to learn that one of our students was named a National Merit 
Scholar Semi-Finalist. Kate Melchior qualified for this award by being one of 16,000 
students selected from a pool of 50,000 highest scorers on the PS AT in 2003. 
Additionally, we were honored to learn that the following students were commended in 
the National Merit Scholarship Program: Callum Borchers, Lauren Carey, Varun 
Chirravuri, Amy DeSorgher, Sam MacLaughlin, and Brett Simmers. These students 
received a certificate of achievement from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation 
and join 34,000 other high school students, selected from a pool of 50,000 of the highest 
scorers nationally on the PS AT in 2003, recognized for their academic promise. We are 
very proud of each of these students for their extraordinary success! 

More than 94% of our graduating seniors took the College Board Examinations. Our 
SAT I and SAT II scores were well above state and national averages. We are pleased to 
announce that our verbal mean score was 560 and our mathematics mean score was 568. 
This year 93% of our 10 th grade students scored in the Advanced/Proficient category in 
English/Language Arts (compared to 63% in the state) and 91 % of our 10 th grade 
students scored in the Advanced/Proficient category in mathematics (compared to 57% at 
the state level). The percentage of 10th grade students performing in the categories of 
advanced and proficient in mathematics rose 9 percentage points from 82% last year! 



114 



Medfield High School students excelled in co-curricular activities as well (see the report 
of the Director of Athletics). Nearly 90% of our students elected to participate in student 
government, a school club, music drama, or athletic programs. In a first ever, our Boys 
Lacrosse Team won a State Championship in Division III, and for the second year in a 
row, the Golf Team notched a State Championship in Division III! Additionally, 
Medfield High School was awarded the prestigious Larry Ames Award. This award is 
given to the school with the best winning percentage in Division IV athletics in 
Massachusetts. It was an honor which warranted a full page report in the sports section 
of the December 23 rd edition of the Boston Globe. In addition, our Concert Band and 
Concert Choir were honored at the Massachusetts Instrumental and Choral Conductors 
Association (MICCA) Festival, earning silver and bronze medals respectively. Our 
Orchestra, Concert Band, Concert Choir, Jazz Choir, and Jazz Ensemble also received 
first place and/or "Best Overall" awards at the New York City Performing Arts 
Consultants Festival. Finally, our Jazz Ensemble took consecutive gold medals at the 
Massachusetts District and All-State Competition. We are also proud of the fact that our 
Jazz Ensemble was invited to play at Boston's Hatch Shell for the third straight year as 
part of the IAJE Showcase Concert. The Music Department was excited to send several 
students representing all of our performing ensembles to both the Southeast District and 
All-State Music Festivals this year. 

In the spring of 2004 our Theater Program presented the musical The Pajama Game and 
in the fall of 2004 the classic play, Quality Street. All shows were well attended and 
received rave reviews from audiences. 

We are pleased to report that our Five Year Acer ediation Report, which was submitted to 
the New England Association for Schools and Colleges (NEASC) in March 2004, was 
approved and our accreditation status renewed. The 41 page document was the work of 
a dedicated sub-committee, which consisted of the principal, Ellen Dugan, Joanne 
Schmidt, Heather Mandosa, and Judy Noble. 

In the area of professional development, we continue to support teachers in areas of 
enrichment, encouraging them to participate in such activities as Teachers as Scholars, 
and Research for Better Teaching courses. Additionally, we continue our work on 
curriculum mapping (and the alignment of our curriculum with the Massachusetts 
Curriculum Frameworks, specifically on course unit maps). In the spring of 2004, a sub 
committee of the Site Council, the Time on Learning Committee, investigated the 
effectiveness of our current schedule and piloted another schedule in March. Final 
decisions on when the new five period per day, seven day cycle rotating schedule should 
be implemented are on hold pending budget outcomes. We continue to honor our 
mission statement which reads, 



115 



Medfield High School, 

in partnership with family 

and community, 

promotes both integrity 

and excellence 

in scholarship and citizenship 

for all learners 



we take great pride in our Core Values: 

Medfield High School is committed to the following Core Values: 

> Challenging Academics for All 

> Lifelong Learning 

> Excellence: Academic, Co-curricular and Character 

> Achievement of Personal Success 

> Respect, Honesty and Integrity 



Regretably, in the spring of 2004, two longtime respected teachers at Medfield High 
School, Allen Azer and Robin Scharak retired. They were honored in the student 
yearbook and through Class Day activities. Mark Nickerson replaced Paul Lindstrom as 
social studies content specialist, and Ellen Toubman filled in for Maura Batts as acting 
content specialist in the foreign language department. 

As the principal of Medfield High School, I have been pleased and honored to be a part 
of this fine community. I have been impressed daily by the dedication and hard work of 
our faculty and students, and look forward to providing continued leadership in this 
district. On behalf of the members of our school community, I would like to publicly 
thank the Superintendent of Schools, the School Committee, the School Planning and 
Building Committee, the High School Site Council, the Medfield Coalition for Public 
Education, the Medfield High School Boosters, and the many parents and community 
members who continually support our young people and our school. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Andrew W. Keough 
Principal 



116 



Commencement 

Lxercises ot 



MEDFIELD 
HIGH SCHOOL 




I he Amos dark Ixingsburij high Ochoo 



CLASS OF 2004 

SUNDAY JUNE 6, 2004 - 2:00 PM 



117 



GRADUATION PROGRAM 

PROCESSIONAL Medfield High School Band 

NATIONAL ANTHEM Senior Chorus 

OPENING REMARKS Robert C. Maguire 

Superintendent of Schools 

WELCOME Jennifer E. Sullivan 

President, Class of 2004 

HONOR ESSAYISTS Kate E. Berlent 

Karen L. Miller 

MESSAGE TO THE CLASS OF 2004 Debra M. Nochese 

Chairperson, Medfield School Committee 

CHORAL SELECTION Senior Chorus 

In My Life, the Beatles 

MESSAGE FROM THE PRINCIPAL Andrew W. Keough 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT Robin L. Bauer 

Treasurer, Class of 2004 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS* 

Debra M. Nochese Medfield School Committee 

Robert C. Maguire Superintendent of Schools 

Andrew W. Keough Principal 

RECESSIONAL Medfield High School Band 



•PLEASE REFRAIN FROM APPLAUSE UNTIL ALL GRADUATES HAVE RECEIVED THEIR DIPLOMAS 



118 



AWARDS 

PRESENTED AT SENIOR RECOGNITION NIGHT 

JUNE 3, 2004 

Daughters of the American Revolution Citizenship Award Robin Bauer 

Exemplar}' Attendance Award Brent Aigler 

Daniel Shuman 

Robert C. Byrd Scholarship Nomination Zoe Samels 

Principal's Leadership Award Jennifer Sullivan 

MSSAA Award Molly Zuccarini 

National Merit Commended Scholars Eric Ashcroft, Kate Berlent, Caitlin Curran 

Stephen MacLellan, Jessica McCann, Jordan Medalia 
Rebecca Minsky, Zoe Samels, Kathleen Stamer, Megan Sutton 

Academic Excellence Awards Brent Aigler, Eric Ashcroft, Robin Bauer, Kate Berlent 

Paige Clunie, Caitlin Curran, Jessica Egan, Katherine Lamie 

Victoria Lane, Stephen MacLellan, Megan McGillicuddy 

Jordan Medalia, Karen Miller, Rebecca Minsky, Zoe Samels 

Gregory Skerry, Kathleen Stamer, Jennifer Sullivan 

Certificate of Mastery Jonathan Amadei, Paul Cabot, Paul Creedon 

Julia Kumpf, Jennifer CMalley, Caryn Rosoff, Kyle Todesca 



SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS 

Medfield High School Scholar/ Athlete Award Brent Aigler 

Robin Bauer 

Medfield Ladies Spring Tennis Jonathan Amadei 

Julie Gertner 

Medfield Youth Sports Boosters Scholarship Victoria Lane 

Joseph Wayne 

Medfield Sportsmen Club's Harry S. Sonnenberg Scholarship Amanda Santucci 

Tim Bussow Memorial Scholarship (sponsored in part by Coca-Cola) Jennifer Matson 

Lamp of Learning Scholarship Colleen Driscoll, Julia Kumpf 

Daniel Shuman, Stefanie Mercadante, Daniel Moss 

National Honor Society Scholarships Robin Bauer, Kate Berlent, Caitlin Curran 

Stephen MacLellan, Zoe Samels, Nicholas Sullivan 

Medfield Teachers Association Book Awards Christopher Ingram, Vicky Hamos 

Kathleen Typadis, Lindsey Woodhull 

Bayer Diagnostics Corporation Scholarship. . . , Aaron Corkhum 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship Victoria Lane 

Jordan Medalia 

Charles P. Love Memorial Scholarship Amanda Murray 

Medfield Women's Association Scholarship Julie Iafolla 

Carlos Andrade Dunkin Donuts Scholarship Jennifer Sullivan 

Thomas Family Dental Associates Scholarship Kathleen Stamer 

Medfield School Boosters Community Service Scholarship Katherine Lamie 

Kelly Quinn 

Medfield School Boosters School Spirit Scholarship Lyndsay Church 

Nicholas Sullivan 

Robert Belmont Track and Field Team Spirit Scholarship Robin Bauer 

Nicholas Sullivan 

Peter Kennedy Memorial Scholarship Nathan Mintz 

Kyle Tannler 



119 



Medfield Youth Basketball Association Bob Porack Memorial Scholarship. . . . Michael Finn 

Alison Grant 
Sarah Stryjewski 

Medfield In-Town Charities Scholarship Brendan McDonald 

Brittany Miller 

Amanda Murray 

Parker Stuart 

Prudential Page Realty Scholarship in Memory of Roger C. Rao Christie Majkut 

Medfield Lions Club Scholarship Kate Berlent 

Jennifer Sullivan 

Medfield Employers and Merchants Organization Scholarship Brendan McDonald 

Kendall Montgomery 

American Legion Women's Auxiliary Scholarship Megan Sutton 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 1 10 Scholarship Andrew Short 

Nicole Yerganian 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Medals Caralie Cahill 

Daniel Moss 

Sons of The Legion Scholarship Charles Feeley 

Kyle Tannler 
Joshua Yoke 

Medfield Youth Baseball/ Softball Scholarship Suzanne Frasca 

Mark O'Sullivan 

Medfield High School Theatre Society Scholarship Marissa Bognanno 

Evan Hatten 

Andrew Short 

Dylan Smith 

David E. Medeiros Theatre Society Memorial Scholarship Jason Mozer 

1A. Blake Theatrical Society Scholarship Aaron Corkhum 

Alicia Mauro 

Medfield Soccer Scholarship Kendall Montgomery 

Lindsey Woodhull 

Student Council Award Scholarships Lyndsay Church 

Alison Grant 

Lee Anne Grove 

Julie Iafolla 

Amy Fiske American Field Service Scholarship Steven Neidermire 

Lisa Wiznitzer 

Amy Fiske Creative Writing Scholarship Paige Clunie 

Middlesex Savings Bank Scholarship Christy Birkett 

Medfield Music Association Scholarship Kate Berlent 

Gregory Skerry 

Lowell Mason Music Education Scholarship Russell Lagman 

Christopher Naughton Memorial Scholarship Kate Berlent 

William Palumbo Baseball Scholarship Matthew Villone 

Medfield League of Women Voters Scholarship. . Kelly Quinn 

Medfield Police Daniel McCarthy Memorial Scholarship Ray Burton 

Medfield Police Detective Robert E. Naughton Memorial Scholarship Peter Harrington 

Benjamin Franklin Savings Bank Scholarship Marissa Bognanno 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club Scholarship Kate Berlent 

Zoe Samels 



120 



Hannah Adams/ Cecile Levesque Memorial Scholarship Julie Iafolla 

Medfield Italian American Scholarship Stefanie Mercadante 

Amanda Santucci 
Kathleen Typadis 

Medfield Youth Hockey Doug Woodruff Scholarship Ryan CRourke 

Peter Panciocco Scholarship Nicholas Falco 

Military Academy Appointment Robin Bauer 

Stephen MacLellan 



CLASS OF 2004 SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 



Franklin and Marshall College Presidential Scholarship Jonathan Amadei 

Hamilton College Bristol Scholarship Kate Berlent 

MA Assoc, of School Adjustment Counselors Scholarship Kate Berlent 

Wentworth Merit Award Scholarship Thomas Burkhart 

Marist College Scholarship and Marist Athletic Scholarship Alison Catenacci 

The Catholic University of America Scholarship Ashley Craig 

Loyola University New Orleans Ignatian Scholar Award Caitlin Curran 

Lasell College Scholarship Charles Feeley 

The Anna Maria Foundress Scholarship Peter Harrington 

University of Connecticut Scholarship Jennifer Hartery 

Shaws Scholarship Christopher Ingram 

University of Massachusetts Amherst Community Scholarship Julia Kumpf 

Rollins Presidential Scholarship and Centennial Award .Katherine Lamie 

Dean College Award Darren Malatesta 

Colby-Sawyer College Award Kristin McDonald 

Grinnell College Trustee Honor Scholarship Jordan Medalia 

Bridgewater State College Scholarship. . , Stefanie Mercadante 

University of Rochester Dean Scholarship Karen Miller 

Northeastern University Grant Beth Morrissey 

Stetson University Dean Scholarship Steven Neidermire 

Salem State Senator Paul E. Tsongas Scholar Award Kelly Quinn 

University of Hartford Alumni Scholarship Zachary Squiers 

Knights of Columbus, Council 85-C. E. Hallice Scholarship Matthew Sullivan 

Comcast Leaders and Achievers Scholarship Jennifer Sullivan 

University of Hartford Alumni Scholarship Zachary Squiers 

Emily Roebling Scholarship Lindsey Woodhull 

Rensselaer Legacy Scholarship Lindsey Woodhull 

Massachusetts AFL-CIO Scholarship Joshua Yoke 



121 



CLASS DAY AWARDS 

PRESENTED AT CLASS DAY 

JUNE 4, 2004 

ART: 

Art Excellence Victoria Lane 

Alicia Mauro 



ENGLISH: 

English Award Karen Miller 

Literary Magazine/Journalism Paul Creedon 

Speech Nicole Yerganian 

Sarah Stryjewski 

Yearbook Molly Zuccarini 

Creative Writing Jessica McCann 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE: 

French Marissa Bognanno 

Spanish Stefanie Mercadante 

National Latin Exam Rebecca Hartstein, Kenneth Richard, Nicole Yerganian 

Joshua Yoke, Joseph Wayne, Matthew Carey 



MATHEMATICS: 

American Math Competition Brent Aigler 

Daniel Moss 

American Invitational Brent Aigler 

Excellence in Math Brent Aigler 

Julia Kumpf 
Daniel Moss 

MUSIC: 

John Philip Sousa Band Christopher Ingram 

Meghan Scheld 

Louis Armstrong Gregory Skerry 

Kate Berlent 

National Choral Alessandra Moore 

Andrew Short 
National Orchestra Russell Lagman 



122 



SCIENCE: 

Biology Brent Aigler 

Lindsey Woodhull 

Chemistry Kathleen Stamer 

Brent Aigler 

Physics Daniel Moss 

Julia Kumpf 

Society of Women Engineers Julia Kumpf 

Kathleen Stamer 
Lindsey Woodhull 



SOCIAL STUDIES: 

Social Studies Award. 



Caitlin Curran 



WELLNESS: 

Outstanding Participation. 



Kathleen Typadis 
Matthew Carey 



PEER LEADERSHIP: 

Robin Bauer Charles Feeley 
Ray Burton Victoria Lane 

Caralie Cahill Christie Majkut 



Jason Mozer 
Ken Richard 
Sarah Stryjewski 



Jennifer Sullivan 
Nicole Yerganian 
Molly Zuccarini 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT: 



Brent Aigler 
Robin Bauer 
Lyndsay Church 
Paul Creedon 
Jessica Egan 



Alison Grant 
Lee Anne Grove 
Julie Iafolla 
Stephen MacLellan 
Mark CSullivan 



Jeffrey Phillips 
John Pittenger 
Gregory Skerry 
Matthew Stadolnik 
Jennifer Sullivan 



Nicholas Sullivan 
Kyle Tannler 
Kathleen Typadis 
Nicole Yerganian 



Pat Kallio Award Kristin McDonald 



Coca Cola Award. 



.Jennifer Sullivan 



123 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES - CLASS OF 2004 



ERIK KYLE ABAZORIUS 
+*BRENT VICKERY A1GLER 

ROBERT DAVID AUNSKY 
'ADRENA NEVARTALTOONIAN 
'JONATHAN ARTHUR AMADEI 
+'BR1C LORETO ASHCROFT 

VICTORIA JANE AVILES 
+*ROBIN LEE BAUER 
+*KATE ELIZABETH BERLENT 

CHRISTY MARIE BIRKETT 
'JESSICA LEE BLANCO 

MARISSA CATHERINE BOGNANNO 

EMILY MARIE BOSAK 
*ANDREA LYNN BOYER 

JOSEPH MARK BRAYTON 

THOMAS WILLIAM BURKHART 

RAY MOORE BURTON 

MICHAEL JAMES BUSWELL 

PAUL CODMAN CABOT, IV 

CARAUE ELIZABETH DOROTHY CAHILL 

MATTHEW PATRICK CAREY 

CHARLES WILTON CATALDO 

AUSON LEA CATENACa 

LYNDSAY SMITH CHURCH 
+*PAICE ALLISON CLUN1E 

JONATHAN JOSEPH CONNORS 

AARON MATHEW CORKHUM 

ASHLEY MARIE CRAIG 

PAUL ANTHONY CREEDON 
+*CA1TUN EUSE CURRAN 

KURTARMAND DANKERS 

CHRISTOPHER MICHAEL DEFRAIN 

MICARLCHBLANGELO DESIR 

JONATHAN RYAN DtMARZO 
*LAUREN ELIZABETH DIPAOLO 
'COLLEEN PATRICIA DRISCOLL 

RYAN MICHAEL DRISCOLL 

CASEY KEVIN DWYER 
+*JESSICA KATHRYN EGAN 

NICHOLAS Ol?OURKE FALCO 

KAREN MARIE PARRY 

CHARLES FREDERICK FEELEY 

K1MBERLY ANN F1CCARDI 

MICHAEL JOSEPH FINN 

SUZANNE MICHELLE FRASCA 

BRADFORD WILLIAM GARNETT 

JUUE ROSE GERTNER 

KATHLEEN ERIN GOLTZ 

BRIANNA WARNE GRABOW 
'AUSON WELSH GRANT 

JEFFREY SCOTT GROCHMAL 

LEE ANNE GROVE 

CHARLES CARNEY GRYSKA 

BRIAN JEROME GUAGUARDO 

KEVIN WILUAM HALL. 

PARASKEVI VICKY HAMOS 

JOHN RALPH HANSON 

JENNIFER LEIGH HARTERY 
'REBECCA ANN HARTSTB1N 

PETER JOHN HARRfNGTON 



EVAN WILLIAM HATTEN 
MICHAEL MARK HERLIHY 
LEANNE SAMANTHA HERSEY 
MEUSSA ERICA HOCHE 
KRISTIN VERONICA HOLBORN 
CHRISTOPHER ANDREW HOWE 
RYAN WILLIAM HUNT 
JUUE MARIE 1AF0LLA 
CHRISTOPHER ROBERT INGRAM 
ERIN MARIE KAVANAUGH 
SANDRA JBANE KEATING 

*LAUREN MARY KELLY 

*LAUREN ELIZABETH KEPPLE 
PATRICK MICHAEL KER1NS 

'JULIA MARIE KUMPP 

*RUSSBLL HALEY LAGMAN 
+*KATHERINB ANN LAMB 
+*VICTORlA JOY LANE 
ROBERT EDWARD LEIST 
JESSIE JEAN UE8ERMAN 
KEVIN TALCOTT LOUnTT 
+*STEPHEN JOSEPH MACLELLAN 

*CHRISTTE ANN MAJKUT 
DARREN ROSS MALATESTA 
ALISON AN1ELE MARTIN 
PAUL BENJAMIN MARTIN 
JENNIFER ELIZABETH WATSON 
VALERIE LILLIAN MATYSKIEL 
ALICIA ANNE MAURO 
JESSICA LYN MCCANN 
GREGORY JOSEPH MCCARTHY 
BRENDAN ALEXANDER MCDONALD 
KRISTIN JENNIFER MCDONALD 
+*MEGAN ANGELA MCGILUCUDDY 
ANDREW ROBERT MCGOWAN 
KJMBERLY LAUREN MCLAUGHLIN 
JOSEPH DAVID MCNAMARA 
♦'JORDAN AITTHONY MEDAL1A 

'STEFANIB MARIE MBRCADANTE 
BRITTANY LAUREN MiaER 
KAREN LYN MILLER 
STEPHANIE JOAN MINER 
ZACHARIAH BULL MINN1CK 
+*REBECCA CLAIRE MINSKY 
NATHAN DANIEL MINTZ 
ALUSON MARIE MITCHELL 
ALEX MICHAEL MONAHAN 
KENDALL JEFFREY MONTGOMERY 

'ALESSANDRA LAURA MOORE 
BETH SUZANNE M0RR1SSEY 

'DANIEL RYAN MOSS 
JASON ROBERT MOZER 
MARIGNY LEIGH MULOCK 
AMANDA LEIGH MURRAY 
LAUREN MARIE MURRAY 
STEVEN ROBERT NEIDERMIRE 
ERIC ROBERT NEWMAN 
STEPHANIE KAREN 0*NEIL 
JENNIFER MARIE OVtALLEY 

*EVERETT GEORGE OPPEL 



RYAN PATRICK 0*ROURKE 
MARK GREGORY O "SULLIVAN 
ALEXANDER JAMBS PAPADONIS 
MICHAEL ROBERT PAQUETTE 
ERIC MICHAEL PERKINS 
JEFFREY SEAN PHILLIPS 
MARC PATTEE P1CARD0 
MATTHEW RICHARD PICCOLO 
CHRISTOPHER MICHAEL PTTONIAK 
JOHN RACHWAL PITTENGER 
MAXWELL BURTON POE 

'KELLY ANNBQUINN 
AMANDA MARION RAMLOW 

*JUUE LYNN RESNIK 
WHITNEY CAROL RBYBURN 
KENNETH DONALD RICHARD 
JONATHAN AL ROBERTA 

*CARYN ALUSON ROSOFF 
ASHLEY JESSICA ROY 
CHRISTOPHER JOHN RUDNICK 
MARKZ1AD SABRA 
KATHERJNE MARIE SAUNO 
+*ZOB CARBARNES SAMBLS 

*AMANDA ADIA SANTUCa 
MEGHAN TUCKER SCHELD 
MICHAEL JAMBS SCWEMER 
ANDREW ROGERS SHORT 

*DANIEL MAX SHUMAN 
ELSBETH LIU AMBER SIM0N1 
+*GREGORY JOSEPH SKERRY 
DYLAN BARTLBTT SMITH 
STAMATIAANN SOUGAN 
ZACHARY BAILEY SQUERS 
MATTHEW JOHN STADOLNIK 
*KATHLEENANN STAMER 
SARAH KRISTEN STRYJEWSKI 
PARKER AUSTEN STUART 
♦'JENNIFER EILEEN SULUVAN 

MATTHEW CHRISTOPHER SULUVAN 
NICHOLAS JAMBS SULUVAN 
MEGAN ELIZABETH SUTTON 
KYLE JAMES TANNLER 
KYLE JEFFREY TODESCA 
JEFFREY DANIEL TODRYS 
KATHLEEN MICHELLE TYPADIS 
CHERYL ANNE VIBIRA 

'MATTHEW ADAM VtLLONB 

'JACQLYN EUSE WADE 
PATRICK JOHN WALSH 
KATHARINE DAV1ES WARE 
JOSEPH WILLIAM WAYNE 
BENJAMIN MATTHEW WEWBR 
'UNDSEY WELSH WOODHULL 
THOMAS OWEN WOODS 
*USA FAYE WIZNTTZBR 
*N1C0LE BOOLE YBRGANIAN 
JOSHUA WILUAM YOKE 
MICHAEL ROBERT ZITOU 
MOLLY MAHER ZUCCARINl 



MARSHALLS 

ALEXANDER BOWUNG TIMOTHY MURPHY 

♦NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 
+RECOGNIZED FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 



124 



REPORT OF THE THOMAS A. BLAKE MIDDLE SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As principal of the Thomas A. Blake Middle School, it is my pleasure to submit this 
annual report for the year ending December 31, 2004. It has again been a year under 
construction in many ways as we have expanded space and programs and adapted others 
to fit the many challenges we faced. Integrating social and emotional intelligence 
throughout the curriculum and continuing to provide challenging and successful learning 
experiences for all students directed much of our energies. 

We started the year with the sixth grade in the new sixth grade wing of the present high 
school and the seventh and eighth in the old wings of the existing Blake building. Then 
the packing began as seventh grade teachers, over a course of six months, moved from 
the old second floor E wing to the second floor C wing and then to the first floor 
renovated rooms of the C wing. The eighth grade teachers moved from the second floor 
old C wing to the newly constructed A and B wings of the building. In addition, the 
library went on carts for the entire year, using the original space, rolling into classrooms 
and then finally staying on carts but using the new LMC in the D wing. The main office 
complex, including the guidance office and the nurse's office, moved into the new spaces 
in the addition. Over the summer, the construction moved into the existing gym and 
cafeteria so we opened in the fall using the shell of the new auditorium as our 
"Warehouse Cafe", transporting meals from the present high school cafeteria. Our 
physical education program moved outside until the weather drove us into the halls for 
Ping-Pong and aerobic exercise. Plans are now in effect to have the final move involve 
the switching of buildings over the summer of 2005. This has been a difficult three years 
as the staff and students have worked surrounded by and at times swallowed up in 
construction. The staffs tenacity to assure that students continually receive the high 
quality education that Blake is renowned for has been our saving grace. I would again, 
publicly, like to thank the dedicated staff, the hard working students and supportive 
parents for helping to assure that learning was our number one priority. 

There is much evidence to show that throughout these years of construction, academic 
success stayed in the forefront. We again did exceptionally well on the State MCAS 
exams in English, math and science and technology. Seven students from grade 6 and 7 
had their poetry published in the National "A Celebration of Poetry" contest. In addition, 
three eighth graders were recognized in the Worldcon Science Fiction Contest. Kevin 
Recco and Scott Maxson received awards for writing science fiction short stories and 
Allison Burke for a science fiction/fantasy themed drawing. Thirty eight readers, an all 
school high, completed all of the 35 summer reading books and served as student leaders 
throughout the all school study of Mississippi Trial, 1955, a novel about the murder of 
young Emmett Till which in many ways sparked the Civil Rights movement. Fifteen 



125 



eighth graders received awards at the MIT Solar Car Competition and Will Donald and 
James Thomas were features at the Engineers Annual Meeting in Boston for their 
extraordinary success on the West Point Bridge Design. 

In January and February we continued our look at the year long theme of Anti-Bullying 
and Teasing which we had started with the all school book When Zachary Beaver Came 
to Town. Rachel Simmons, the national author of Odd Girl Out and Odd Girl Speaks Out, 
presented six workshops for the girls in grades 5-8 and 450 members of the Medfield 
parent community, providing a look into the psychology of girls being mean to girls, 
sometimes even their "best" friends. Michael Thompson, the well known author of 
Raising Cain and About Boys, shared insights into the often physical nature of boys' 
friendships. He spoke to boys from grades 5-8 and with over 300 parents. It was through a 
generous Medfield Coalition grant that both authors visited Blake and shared such 
powerful knowledge with students, staff and parents. Their knowledge allowed us to 
conduct a series of same sex and mixed gender groups so that all students became more 
aware of what bullying and teasing look like and ways that these actions can stop. The 
Student Council then took many of the ideas generated by these workshops and designed 
an Anti-Bullying Pledge which staff and students all signed. These documents have 
become part of our student and staff handbook. Our health teachers took a serious look at 
bullying in the halls of Blake by surveying students. Their findings will assure that we 
continue to address these issues on an on-going basis. 

The social and emotional intelligence of our students is essential. Thus the themes of 
treating each other with respect and surviving adolescence are on-going at Blake. As a 
follow-up to our author workshops, this past October, Sue Blaney, presented to over 300 
parents her well known Stop the Rollercoaster workshop which shared ways that parents 
can more successfully work with their young adults during these turbulent teenage years. 
MYCC, Medfield Youth Community Coalition, rose out of the many discussions sparked 
by this evening and Blake administrators work closely with the groups to provide 
additional support for Medfield's young people. In the spring, four Blake teachers 
presented "What You Need to Know about the Internet that Your Children already 
Know". Too much bullying goes on through instant messaging, and rumors can fill the 
internet waves. This workshop offered both information and strategies to parents to help 
prevent these painful actions. Our long standing sixth grade parent workshops and our 
seventh grade Quest program continue to support working with parents to more 
effectively support "our" children. 

During the summer, the entire school read the City of Ember as our all-school book. This 
book, written by Jeanne DuPrau, provided another opportunity to look at how we need to 
behave if we want our relationships and our world to survive. Answering the question 
"How does Science Fiction serve as Social Commentary?' Because of a generous 
Medfield Coalition grant, Ms. DuPrau spent two days at Blake. She spoke to all students 
and staff about the concerns that face our world, as well as what influences what authors 



126 



choose to write about and how they choose to express themselves. In addition, she 
worked with selected student authors, sharing tips about writing and listening to some of 
their ideas. It was another powerful unifying community learning experience. 

Community Service allows us a key opportunity to help develop a more informed and 
compassionate future generation. SEPS, Students Involved in Public Service, made 
considerable contributions this year spearheading many of our community service 
projects along with our Student Council and team leaders. SEPS gathered coats for the 
homeless, books for island libraries in Maine, Pennies for Patients and sporting goods for 
children in the Dominican Republic. In addition they collected canned goods for the 
Medfield Food Pantry, shared baskets of holiday cheer with the elderly at the Thomas 
Upham House and participated in the Walk for Hunger and the Alzheimer Walk. Sixth 
graders took on the Heifer Project, integrating the program into their science, social 
studies and MARS curriculum. Speakers came and students raised money to help those in 
poorer nations be better able to help themselves. Eighth grade has long been committed to 
helping both the young and the old as they again provided much of the labor for the 
Christmas in The City event and the traditional Tilden Village Holiday Dinner. In 
addition, they worked in many local capacities as part of their bike trip through Medfield 
and led the labor force in preparing for Medfield' s second Relay for Life. We end this 
calendar year with the horrific news of the Southeast Asian Tsunami and begin plans to 
help in this relief effort on a long term basis. 

The richness of one's education can also be found in the extra curricular activities and 
field trips that complement the strong academic program at Blake. Our school play 
"Crooks, Comedy and Chaos", written by our drama director Loretta Fahey, involved 
over 140 students in the joy of theater. A record number of teams from Blake 
participated in Destination Imagination, using their creative problem solving skills in 
many unique ways. Our musical groups did extremely well. Our 7 th /8 th grade Concert 
Choir won a bronze award at the MICCA Festival and a gold medal in the Music in the 
Park Festival. Our 8 th grade band likewise won the bronze at MICCA and the gold at the 
Music in the Park. The 7 th grade band won the silver at MICCA. Our Jazz Band won the 
gold and our Orchestra won the silver at the Music in the park while Ani Arun won Best 
Accompanist and Rebecca Mauro won best vocal soloist. Speakers came to the school 
and students traveled outside the school to make that essential link between academic 
learning and the real world. Sixth graders saw Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream 
as part of their Shakespeare unit, listened to a Mark Twain presentation in preparation for 
the study of Tom Sawyer, marveled at the Museum of Science presentation on energy and 
viewed the IMAX Titanic as part of the social studies exploration unit. They spent time at 
Moose Hill understanding the geological beginnings of land formation and at the Heifer 
farm understanding how basic needs of third world countries can be more adequately met. 
Seventh graders completed a second year of starting the school year with the four day trip 
to Nature's Classroom in Lake George, New York. This year, in addition to the outdoor 
education program, the team building activities, and the re-enactment of the Underground 



127 



Railroad, students learned about the role of Fort Ticonderoga in early American history. 
Yoko Kawashima Watkins continues to inspire young readers as she shares her life in war 
torn Japan that students have read about in So Far From the Bamboo Grove. Both 
seventh and eighth graders enjoyed assemblies during Foreign Language week as they 
listen to and participate in both French and Spanish songs and dances. Our Career 
Education program continues to provide students with an excellent eye at the world of 
work through both speakers who share their many varied careers and hands-on 
experiences in the world of work. Steve Burton, sports announcer from Channel Four and 
Angus McQuilken, candidate for Massachusetts Senate, were keynote speakers for these 
events. The annual eighth grade trip took in highlights of Washington DC, Baltimore, and 
NYC. Let us not forget the New England Patriots and the Boston Red Sox who provided 
a rallying point for us all as we ignited the Blake spirit behind both of these fantastic 
championship teams. 

Communication has been and continues to be a major focus. As our population was 
spread throughout three buildings and our parents went between two schools, the need to 
stay informed was essential. We expanded our use of teacher web pages so that all staff 
members share important information with parents via the school web page. In addition 
we brought. 87% of the parents on line through a school bulk blind email link. We also 
started a weekly NEWSFLASH which keeps parents informed of all events involving the 
Blake community. We will continue to expand the Blake website, and with the new 
resources, hope to revive our school newspaper and establish an in- house TV studio. 

Technology continues to be a major focus as we expand our curriculum resources and 
extend our efforts to reach all learners. Papa Gino's joined forces with us this year, 
providing our technology fund with 20% of the profits from their sales on the second 
Thursday of the month. We have used these funds to buy software and licenses to enrich 
existing programs. We hope to complete our technology benchmarks this year and 
continue to utilize assistive technology to help more students be successful. 

"How we use time to most effectively educate our youth?" has been a question we have 
examined this past year. We have looked at our current schedule, schedules of other area 
middle schools, the high school current schedule and the high school proposed pilot 
schedule in an effort to study how best to teach young adolescents. We have made moves 
over the last four years to reduce study halls and engage students more in real life hands 
on experiences and will continue to explore how to do this with no new funding. 

As we move into 2005, we hope that Blake finally settles in to its new home and all of 
our energies can be redirected back to the education of young people. We will be working 
to assure that a middle school program remains for students as we adjust to a high school 
physical plant and contend with the fourth year of budget restraints. Although our 
population has remained somewhat stable over the last two years, our knowledge of what 
young adolescents need to achieve at their greatest potential encourages us to redesign 



128 



and create more complex and fulfilling programs, all of which involves additional 
resources. Integration of technology to both expand student access and aid in curriculum 
design will be a major focus. We face another exciting and challenging year, but as the 
Red Sox showed us this year, if you keep the faith and play as a team, success will come. 
The students, staff and parents of Blake continue to do just that. It is a joy to work with 
such inquisitive and enthusiastic young minds, committed and talented staff, and 
supportive and caring parents. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret Mongiello 
Principal 



129 



REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As principal for the Dale Street School for the 2004 to 2005 school year, I am delighted 
to submit this report for the year ending December 31, 2004. 

ENROLLMENT 

The enrollment at Dale Street School on October 1, 2004 was 257 students in grade four 
and 245 students in grade five for a total of 502 students. The average class size was in 
the range of 22/23 students per class. 

INSTRUCTIONAL HIGHLIGHTS AND ACHIEVEMENTS 

The major instructional focus this year at the Dale Street School has continued to be the 
curriculum mapping and review initiative underway in the school district. At Dale Street, 
teachers have worked to align our math curriculum with the state standards and are now 
revising and developing the assessments for each unit of study in the math program. The 
focus this year has been on using the assessments to shape instruction and refining 
supplementary materials to meet the needs of all learners. 

Dale Street teachers (along with the entire K-5 staff) have been working on a year long 
curriculum review of the English/Language Arts curriculum. In-service opportunities 
have been devoted to grade levels documenting what they teach in English/Language 
Arts, aligning it with the Massachusetts State Frameworks and creating maps that 
demonstrate standards, benchmarks, assessments, core vocabulary and skills within the 
five strands of the Frameworks. Further work will develop recommendations for change 
and/or improvement. 

As part of the District's plan to support students who might be at risk of failing MCAS 
tests, Dale Street School continued to implement a plan for MCAS Remediation 
Academies. The program calls for Individual MCAS Student Success Plans to be 
developed for students who met specific criteria and extra instruction was provided in 
small groups either before or after school. MCAS Academies provided remedial support 
to students in the areas of English/Language Arts for students in grade 4 and 5 and 
mathematics for students in grade 5. 

Dale Street School teachers also explored ways to provide differentiated instructional 
activities for students in their classes. The teachers worked with a consultant to help 
them plan lessons and activities that will both challenge and meet the needs of all 
students in their classrooms. The area of focus this year for differentiated activities has 
had an emphasis on English/Language Arts; however, support was also provided in the 



130 



areas of mathematics, social studies and science. This will be an ongoing focus over the 
next couple of years at the school. 

Dale Street has welcomed the addition of an Instructional Technology Specialist (K-5) to 
the staff. 

Some of the highlights in the area of technology include: 

• Training in the Classworks Gold Math and ELA Programs for 
MCAS Academy teachers 

• Tom Snyder software training for teachers 

• CD-ROM training for new programs in mathematics, problem- 
solving and creative thinking 

• The purchase of additional Alpha Smarts with keyboarding 
programs to support whole class activities 

• The purchase of additional laser printers 

A major initiative nearly completed at Dale Street School has been the revitalization of 
the playground. This is a major need that was identified as part of the School 
Improvement Plan. The Playground Improvement Committee was formed and began 
meeting in October of 2002. The committee is comprised of parents, teachers and the 
principal. The Playground Committee agreed on and has completed two priorities: 

• First, to develop and implement a design plan for the playground that would 
provide for new play equipment and almost double the size of the existing 
blacktop area used at recess. New equipment purchased included a slide event, 
swings, new basketball hoops, an outdoor classroom, seating and trash 
receptacles. 

• Second, to independently raise the funds necessary to support the implementation 
of the design plan. 

A playground architect was hired to work with the committee and a design plan was 
completed last spring. The plan will be implemented in four phases. Numerous 
fundraising events were held throughout the year to support the implementation of the 
first two phases of the plan. The first two phases were completed by June of last year. 
Future goals include finishing the playground with painted games on the blacktop, 
planting shade trees, landscaping and creating a quiet reading area. 

Students continued their participation in a number of enrichment activities. As part of the 
unit of study on geology, grade four students visited the Peabody Museum. Fourth grade 
enjoyed a performance of "Pippi Longstocking" at the Wheelock Family Theatre. The 
fourth grade was visited by High Touch-High Tech, a hands-on science lab entitled The 
Power of Light. Fifth grade students attended a performance by the Boston Symphony 



131 



Orchestra, a field trip to the Christa McAuliffe Space Center at Framingham State 
College, and visited the Museum of Science. Fifth grade also attended a workshop by Mr. 
Magnet to support the unit on electricity and magnetism. Both fourth and fifth grade 
participated in a week long Poet in Residence (Andrew Green) as well as a week long 
Author in Residence (Barbara O'Connor). 

School-wide enrichment included the continuation of our Intramural Program, the 
Bullying and Teasing Program, the National Geography Bee and performances that 
featured the Magic of Lyn, Pyramids and Pharaohs (Grade 5) , and The Legend of 
Sleepy Hollow. Monthly school-wide assemblies touched on the themes of change, 
safety, world hunger, and school spirit and community. 

STAFF RECOGNITION 

Dale Street's fourth grade teacher, Mrs. Katherine Belmont was recognized as "Teacher 
of the Year" by the Norfolk County Teacher's Association. 

PUBLIC/PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT 

Throughout the school year, the Dale Street School Council and the Community School 
Association (CSA) have continued to provide opportunities for parental involvement with 
the goal of strengthening the tie between home and school. The continuation of our 
community service program, The Beacon Program, continues to be a highlight of the 
parents' efforts. The Beacon Program provides students opportunities to serve the 
community as volunteers at the Public Library, Rocky Woods, Animal Shelter, Park and 
Recreation Department, Tilden Village, and the Fire Department. 

The CSA provided Dale Street School with funding for the revitalization of the 
playground, sponsored the Holiday Create-A-Craft Fair and Kids Night Out, raised funds 
through Box Tops for Education, SCRIP, the sale of Yankee Candles and provided 
volunteers in the classrooms and Library Media Center. 

The School Council continues to support the development of school goals, to provide 
input into the development of the school budget and to annually review the curriculum 
guides, Student/Parent Handbook, and Parent Information Night. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kim L. Cave 
Principal 



132 



REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with great pride that I report on the school year ending December 3 1 , 2004, in my 
first year as principal of the Ralph Wheelock School. 

As of October 1, 2004, total enrollment is 479 students. We have ten second grades with 
222 students, and twelve third grades with 257 students. ACCEPT Education 
Collaborative and The Education Collaborative (TEC) programs are housed at Wheelock 
as well with a total enrollment of 13 students. 

A dedicated, bright and energetic staff continues to uphold the Medfield Public Schools' 
commitment to children as individuals. Teachers and staff consistently employ a variety 
of strategies in responding to the needs of individual learners, and continue to challenge 
themselves as learners by focusing on continued professional development. 

In supporting the Wheelock staff in this endeavor, our Community Service Association 
(CSA) provided a generous allocation this past year, allowing staff to participate in a 
variety of workshops. Staff members have been able to attend many workshops and have 
brought back ideas to share as we continue to support differentiated instruction for our 
students. We hope to continue this trend toward support of professional development by 
restoring funds in the '05 -'06 budget that will allow teachers the opportunity to continue 
to grow as professionals, thereby directly impacting instruction. 

Last year's study of our math curriculum produced a document carefully aligned to The 
Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks that encourages children to develop as 'problem 
solvers'. Our math curriculum continues to be re-evaluated through assessment to ensure 
children develop skills beyond 'rote' mathematics. 

We are duplicating this thoughtful study of curriculum in the area of English/Language 
Arts as we investigate 'best practices' in developing literacy in children. Study teams are 
presently documenting our alignment with the Frameworks, and investigating materials 
that will support our English/Language Arts curriculum. They are aided in this task by 
our new Director of Curriculum and Assessment, Pam Shufro, and will benefit from 
Pam's expertise in the area of literacy development. 

Our Library Media Center, under the direction of Susan Pope, received a boost this year 
with the addition of Teri O'Brien, Instructional Technology Specialist, who aids LMC 
staff in providing instructional support to both students and staff in the area of 
technology. 



133 



The Wheelock staff also remains committed to our Social Competency Program, Open 
Circle, a model developed by the Stone Center at Wellesley College. The Open Circle 
philosophy places children at the center of conflict resolution, and offers a year-long 
schedule of directed class meetings and assemblies designed to promote positive school 
culture. 

This school year brought recognition to both students and staff Mike Slason, physical 
education teacher, was recognized in, Who's Who of American Teachers, because of a 
letter written by a former student that attested to the difference he made in shaping a 
young life. Mike is exactly the type of teacher Wheelock embodies - embarrassed by 
recognition and fueled only by his desire to make a difference in the lives of children. 

Third grade student, Kendra Farris, was also recognized at a school assembly this year for 
her ability to make a difference in.the lives of others. Kendra, devastated by the death of 
two grandparents who lost battles with cancer, decided that she would, and I quote, 
"Choose Hope". Kendra, with the help of her family and fellow Wheelock students, 
Anya Conti and Julie Watson, raised enough money by making and selling fudge to buy 
the entire student population of the Wheelock School a LIVESTRONG bracelet, with all 
proceeds benefiting cancer research in the hopes of finding a cure. We are so proud of 
their efforts. 

Our Wheelock students also began a Wave of Support effort in raising funds for UNICEF 
that will directly benefit the victims of the recent tsunami tragedy, further evidence we 
are developing a generation of people who will 'think globally and act locally'. 

We continue to receive extraordinary support from parent volunteers who not only help 
in classrooms, but provide 'behind the scenes' support in all areas of our operation. We 
greatly appreciate the many extras these volunteers provide. 

In sum, we have enjoyed a productive school year and look forward to working with the 
Medfield community to ensure the continued success of our school programs. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Patricia A. Gorman, Principal 



134 



REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As principal of the Memorial School, I respectfully submit my annual report for the 
school year ending December 31, 2004. This is my fourth annual report for the Town of 
Medfield. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

The Memorial School services students in our Integrated Preschool, kindergarten and 
grade one programs. Memorial's enrollment, as of October 1, 2004, totals five hundred 
thirty-three students. This number represents fifty-three preschoolers enrolled in morning 
or afternoon sessions, two hundred thirty-three kindergarten students attending in 
morning or afternoon sessions and two hundred forty-seven grade one students. 

We currently have eleven sections of kindergarten and twelve grade one classes. The 
average class size for kindergarten is twenty-one students. The first grade average class 
size is twenty students. We have added one half time preschool teacher to our school this 
year. 

We are now enjoying the completed building project at Memorial and are most pleased 
with our beautiful state of the art facility and the additional needed space to provide our 
students educational opportunities which were not possible in the old building including a 
new wing of Special Education servic rooms, a complete Art Room with a kiln, a new 
Music Room and a state of the art Library Media Center. 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

The Memorial School staff continually strives to expand the learning opportunities 
provided to our students. To achieve this goal teachers have participated in a variety of 
activities and coursework offered by the school system and outside workshops and 
institutes of higher learning. To maintain the national accreditation awarded in 2000 by 
the National Association for the Education of Young Children, our preschool staff must 
continually monitor, evaluate and review their practices in providing a developmental^ 
appropriate program for three and four year old children, both with and without special 
needs. 

Summer curriculum development resulted in the formulation of a number of worthwhile 
projects. Kindergarten and grade one teacher groups worked to update our progress 
reports here at Memorial to better reflect our practices. Kindergarten staff and grade one 
staff worked to design tiered, supplemental activities for the remaining new math units. 
An additional summer math project involved the completion of a Problem Solving unit 
for the grade one math curricula. Two staff members completed work on the Socio- 



135 



Emotional Learning Study Group which involved representatives from all district 
buildings. Currently, Memorial staff are involved in the Language Arts Study Group to 
study, examine and align our current curricula with the Massachusetts Curriculum 
Frameworks. 

"Teachers Teaching Teachers" continues to be a valuable source of professional 
development for Memorial staff. "After Hours" courses this year have been offered to 
support the new computer instructional and assessment materials for language arts and 
math. Literacy training has also been offered on best kindergarten literacy practices. Our 
Social Competency Program continues to be a major initiative at Memorial as we 
continue to train new staff members to insure consistency in the manner through which 
we help develop socially competent behavior in our students. This year we have 
continued our monthly "Get Along Gatherings" to address topics such as kindness, 
manners and cooperation. A social competency parent training piece has also been 
developed and sessions have taken place under the leadership of the school psychologist 
to help parents to incorporate the strategies and techniques used by the staff with their 
children at home. 

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT 

Our School Council developed the 2004-2005 School Improvement Plan and presented it 
to the school committee in June 2004. Through this document we continue to study and 
improve early literacy and math foundation skills as well as safety concerns. An 
additional goal this year was to further our computer usage with students to include 
greater instructional and assessment components. 

The Memorial School Community School Association (CSA) continues to make 
significant contributions to the school through both financial support and volunteerism. 
Among their contributions have been the funding of the license of our webpage site as 
well as their funding of many teacher classroom requests. A CSA purchase included an 
outdoor xylophone and whale drum to be incorporated into our playground. The CSA and 
contributions from the Medfield Coalition have provided our students a Performing Arts 
Series. Through this endeavor our students have enjoyed presentations throughout the 
year. Included in these interesting performances has been Johnny Appleseed, Johnny the 
K, Dinosaurs & Fossils, Theater to Do, Explore the Ocean World, Food Play, and Mother 
Goose. The children and staff at Memorial are most appreciative of these programs 
which add so much to the cultural experience of our students. 

A committee of kindergarten parents is working to supplement the science curriculum by 
providing hands-on science inquiry experiences to each of our kindergarten classes. The 
Everybody Counts Program is also a parent organized and presented program at 
Memorial that helps our students to understand disabilities such as vision impairment. 
Literacy events in the form of visiting authors come to us through the efforts of the CSA. 
We are most fortunate to have many other dedicated parents support the Memorial 



136 



School, its staff and students with time spent in classrooms, collating Thursday packets 
and volunteering in our cafeteria and library. 



The Medfield Coalition for Public Education has continued to support Memorial staff 
endeavors through their generous grants. A summer reading program developed by two 
Memorial teachers called "Alphabet Soup and Nursery Rhymes" for rising first graders 
has been extended to include rising second grade students with a program titled "Long 
Ago and Far Away". This initiative has been partially funded through the Coalition as 
well. We continue to encourage high school students interested in education careers to 
work in our classrooms. This year we are again enjoying four volunteers as part of our 
program. We are also most fortunate to have a group of Medfield senior citizens that 
continue to contribute by volunteering in our classrooms as well as serving as greeters at 
our North Street entrance sign-in desk. 

FUTURE TRENDS 

Emphasis on developing literacy in all areas of the curriculum will continue through the 
efforts of this most dedicated and professional staff. We will continue to focus on 
technology and how to best use our updated computer stations and software. 
Differentiation of instruction continues to be a school focus in all academic areas. 
Language Arts Study Groups will continue to support the teaching and learning process. 

It is a pleasure to work in a community with the continued high level of commitment to 
education and the future of its children that Medfield demonstrates. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Barbara Levine 
Principal 



137 



REPORT OF THE PUPIL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I wish to submit my Pupil Services Department report for the year ending December 31, 
2004. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

The student enrollment in the special education program has remained consistent with the 
previous year. 



Students 


Dec. 1,2003 


Dec 


.1,2004 


ages 3-5 


54 




60 


ages 6-17 


305 - 




322 


ages 18-21 


18 




11 




377 




393 



Most of our children receive their services within our school system as indicated below: 

SPECIAL EDUCATION FIGURES ONLY: Dec. 1 , 2004 

Grades K-5 138 

Grades 6-8 80 

Grades 9-12 89 

Collaborative Placements 1 1 

Private Day 14 

Private Residential 1 

As a member of the ACCEPT Collaborative, the special education program has benefitted 
from two grants received by ACCEPT. The first grant provides training to staff on 
autism. The second grant provides training in Project Read to special and regular 
education teachers, which will benefit students in reading strategies and tools to assess 
reading skills. 

PRESCHOOL 

To meet the growing needs of young children with disabilities, we have added an 
additional session to the preschool program. We now have 6 half day early childhood 
sessions providing service for 37 four year old and 39 three year old children. This 
program is supported by tuition and grant funding. 



138 



GUIDANCE SERVICES 

The guidance program at Medfield High School provides enrichment for the whole 
student. Four counselors, who work with the same alphabetical breakdown of students 
for the time they are in high school, help students make a smooth transition into high 
school and aid them in fulfilling their emotional, academic, and social needs. The 
guidance curriculum continues to improve and refine its focus. With students facing 
anxiety around the transition from middle school to high school, the ninth grade guidance 
curriculum focuses on orientation, four year plans, goal setting, transcripts and making 
the most of high school. Sophomore year includes career exploration and a closer look at 
a student's learning style. Future planning, including college and career plans, are the 
major focus in the eleventh grade. Senior year is dedicated to the college application 
process and how it relates to an individual student, rinding and applying to jobs, colleges, 
and monetary assistance including scholarships and the transition from high school into 
college. With this structure in place, which builds off of the middle school curriculum, 
the Guidance department continually improves its services to students and families as 
well as communication through newsletters, the website and other similar 
correspondence. 

Guidance at the middle school is an integral part of the support system that helps all 
children achieve academic success, healthy self-esteem, and sensitivity to the needs of 
others and the ability to cope with change. Through group guidance classes, individual 
counseling and professional interaction with colleagues and parents, the three guidance 
counselors foster students' personal growth and help them build on their strengths and 
interests. At each grade level, a developmental^ designed curriculum provides for 
students' exposure to age appropriate topics. Guidance updates in the Blake Middle 
School newsletter and on the website provide important information to parents and 
students on educational issues. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

Five full time nurses provide services to children in the school system. The role of the 
school nurse continues to expand as the student population we serve faces a broad 
spectrum of complex health issues. The nurses are both caring and conscientious in 
providing services and maintaining a healthy school environment. 

The diverse role of the school nurse includes care for children with medical special needs: 
participation at special education team meetings; conducting home visits as recommended 
by the school planning team; education on health issues for students, staff, and parents as 
well as performing state mandated screenings and monitoring state requirements such as 
physical examinations and immunizations. 



139 



One hundred eighty-four youngsters were screened for kindergarten last year with the 
assistance of school personnel and trained volunteers. We would like to thank Medfield 
Eye Care and the Medfield Lions Club for all their assistance. Additional volunteers 
assisted our nurses in completing vision and hearing screening for children in preschool 
through grade 9. As always, we are very grateful for this assistance without which we 
would be unable to conduct so many screenings in a timely way. 

PERSONNEL 

We are pleased that Ms. Sally DeGeorge has joined the preschool team. Ms. DeGeorge 
has taken the new position of preschool teacher. In the guidance department, Ms. Tracy 
Allen has joined the Blake Middle School staff; Ms. Kathleen Brockhurst has filled the 
part-time guidance position at the Wheelock School; and Ms. Amanda Samaha has 
replaced Ms. Barbara Meyer in the guidance office in the high school. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Kathleen McArdle 
Director of Pupil Services 



140 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my annual report as the athletic director for the Medfield Public 
Schools for the year ending December 31, 2004. 

It is my pleasure to report that for the tenth year in a row over seventy- five percent of the 
student body participated in athletics. This statistic reaffirms the integral part athletics 
pla>in our school and the education of our children. 

My goal will be to continue to emphasize the tradition of sportsmanship, which has been 
our history here in Medfield. Fair play, competition, goal setting, team work, are just a 
few of the life lessons that athletics can teach. Athletics truly is the other half of 
education. 

We offer 27 varsity interscholastic sports to our students. This year we won nine Tri 
Valley League Championships, and 74% of all our contests. This was the best winning 
percentage in the league. We won the Larry Ames Award for the second consecutive 
year. This award is given each year to the town with the best winning percentage in the 
state in our division. Division is based on school population. This is the fourth time in 
seven years that we have won this prestigious award. We all take great pride in this 
accomplishment. 

Boys and girls interscholastic teams were offered at three levels during the past year. The 
following is the entire athletic coaching staff by season: 



Basketball (Boys) 



WINTER 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Herb Grace 
Michael Mason 
Ben Vessa 



Basketball (Girls) 



Varsity 

Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



John Dunn 
Meredith Miller 
Mark Nickerson 
Paul Coutinho 



Cheering 
Ice Hockey- 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 



Georganne Gerlach 

John Panciocco 
John Fratillilo 
James Woods 
Rich Kelleher 



141 



Indoor Track (Boys) 
Indoor Track (Girls) 




Nicholas Stevens 
Bernie Shea (Assist.) 
Matt Cherner 


Gymnastics 


Varsity 
Assistant 


Michelle Hopping 
Bill Matyskiel 


Swimming 


Varsity 
Assistant 

SPRING 


Carol Bauer 
Paul Estrada 


Baseball 


Varsity 


Mark Nickerson 




Junior Varsity 
Freshman 


Ben Vessa 
Nick Mabardy 


Softball 


Varsity 
Junior Varsity 


Johanna Madge 
Erik Ormberg 


Tennis (Boys) 


Varsity 


Vincent Joseph 


Tennis (Girls) 


Varsity 


Ross Irwin 


Tennis 


Junior Varsity Coed 


Andy Delery 


Track and Field (Boys) 
Track and Field (Girls) 


Varsity 
Varsity 


Michael Kraemer 
Bernie Shea 
Brian Lee 
Michael Slason 
Carol Bauer 
Mairi Reynolds 


Volleyball (Boys) 


Varsity 


John Hastings 


Lacrosse (Boys) 
Lacrosse (Girls) 


Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 


Robert Aronson 
Michael Douglas 
Paul Ramos 
Kristen Smith 
Jason Heim 



142 



FALL 



Cheering 




Georganne Gerlach 


Golf 


Varsity 


George Callahan 




Junior Varsity 


Al Keith 


Cross Country 


Varsity 


Michael Kraemer 
Bernie Shea 
Carol Bauer 


Field Hockey 


Varsity 


Jennifer Carey 




Junior Varsity 


Veronica Boyle 




Freshman 


Sarah Dawson 


Football 


Varsity 


Vincent Joseph 
Mike Slason 
Erik Ormberg 




Junior Varsity 


Nick Stevens 




Freshman 


Ian Gagne 


Soccer (Boys) 


Varsity 


Jason Heim 




Junior Varsity 


Al Kearney 




Freshman 


Paul Coutinho 


Soccer (Girls) 


Varsity 


Kristen Smith 




Junior Varsity 


Travis Taliferro 




Junior Varsity II 


Katrina Majkut 


Volleyball (Girls) 


Varsity 


John Hastings 




Junior Varsity 


Sarah Buckley 




Junior Varsity II 


Monique Goodrow 



All of our interscholastic teams participate in the Tri-Valley League which consists of 
Ashland, Bellingham, Dover- Sherborn, Holliston, Hopkinton, Medfield, Medway, Millis, 
Norton and Westwood. Medfield is currently ranked fourth in the TVL in total 
enrollment, grades nine through twelve. The league is highly competitive in all sports, 
boys and girls. Tri-Valley teams traditionally are quite successful in state tournament 
play. 

Our athletic highlights begin with the winter season, 2003-2004. The girls basketball 
team had a 17-3 regular season record, which earned them a share of the Tri Valley 
League title.. The girls qualified for state tournament play for the fifteenth year in a row. 



143 



Our boys team finished their season with a 13-7 record, good for second place in the 
league. Girls indoor track was second in the TVL, with a 5-1 record. Our boys indoor 
track team was 6-0, and won the league title. Thomas Woods was the league MVP. The 
ice hockey team's record was 10-4, good for third place in the league. Our girls swim 
team was 8-0 on the season, and came in second in the state finals. The boys swim team 
was 3-8 in a very competitive league. Our girls gymnastics finished their season at 6-4. 
Val Matyskiel was the state champion in the vault and the floor exercise. 

The spring of 2004 was another successful season for our Warriors. Softball had a 7-1 1 
record and just missed qualifying for the tournament. Our baseball team finished 13-7, 
really turning their program around with a young team. Our girls tennis team was 15-1, 
and were league champions. The boys tennis team finished 13-3 and qualified again for 
the state tournament for the fifteenth consecutive year. Boys track finished the season 
undefeated 9-0, and won their third consecutive league title. Our girls track team 
finished 8-1, finishing second in the TVL. The boys lacrosse team had a remarkable 
season. They finished with an 18-2 record, won the league for the fourth year in a row, 
and won the State Championship. Matt Aronson was named the Globe and Herald All 
Scholastic and was the Globe Division 3 player of the year. Bob Aronson our coach, was 
the Division 3 Coach of the year. The girls lacrosse team had a tremendous season 
finishing 11-7, and qualified for the state tournament for the fourth year in a row. The 
boys volleyball team had some great late season wins with a young team, and look 
forward to good things in the future. 

Fall 2004 was very exciting for our Warrior teams. This was the first season of play for 
our new artificial turf field. This field was completed by a group of parents led by Tim 
Nugent and has been a tremendous source of pride for our school and our town. It is a 
remarkable accomplishment to have raised over $300,000 in a little more than 8 months. 
The girls volleyball won the TVL with a 19-1 mark. The team competed in the state 
finals, and lost in 5 tough games. Molly Barrett was selected as a Globe All Scholastic 
and MVP of the league. Catherine Burrell was a Herald All Scholastic. The football 
team finished 9-2, in a great season. Bryan Lee was the MVP of the Thanksgiving Day 
game against Dover Sherborn. Field hockey won their third league title in as many years 
going 10-4-2. Lauren Carey was the Tri Valley player of the year, and coach Jen Carey 
was the TVL Coach of the year. Boys soccer finished their season 6-11-1, under new 
coach Jason Heim. Our girls soccer program had a great season, and finished 13-5-3, 
they were third in the league. Both our boys and girls cross-country teams had 
outstanding seasons. The boys cross country team was undefeated again this year. Matt 
Tuths was named TVL runner of the year. The girls finished at 5-2. Our golf team had a 
15-2 record and tied for the league title. The boys went on to win their second 
consecutive state title. Jeff Cutter was a Globe All Scholastic award winner. 

The annual All Sports Banquet, sponsored by the Medfield Boosters, was held in early 
June at Christina's in Foxboro. An audience of over 400 student athletes, coaches and 
parents were treated to a very special evening including the seventh annual Thomas Reis 



144 



Sportsmanship Award which was presented this year to Thomas Woods and Ali Grant. 
At the banquet, in addition to the individual sport MVP awards, Robin Bauer and Brent 
Aigler were named the 2003-2004 Scholar Athlete recipients. Medfield High School's 
"Wall of Fame" inductees were Dawn (Plesh) Young Class of 1983, and Steven Snow 
Class of 1984. 

At the June graduation exercises, J.J. Reardon and Katie Whalen were named recipients 
of the School Boosters Spirit Award. First Team Tri-Valley League All-Star selections 
for 2003-2004 are as follows: 



Boys Basketball 

Girls Basketball 

Ice Hockey 
Boys Indoor Track 



Bryan Lee 
Evan Moon 

Jill Anelauskas 
Sarah Stryjewski 

DJ. Fandel 

Alex Hinga 
Thomas Woods 
Nick Sullivan 



Mike Finn 



Ali Grant 



Jeff Cutter 

Philip Kiley 
Dan Moss 
Brent Aigler 



Girls Indoor Track 
Swimming 



Kristen Marshall 

Meghan Nowak 
Katya Velichansky 



Steph Martin 
Robin Bauer 



Gymnastics 
Baseball 



Valerie Matyskiel 
Nathan Mintz 



Joe Brayton 



Softball 
Girls Tennis 

Boys Tennis 



Ali Catenacci 

Christen Cadigan 
Katie Ryan 

Ryan Ward 
Tom Nowak 



Liz Nugent 



Brendan Ward 



145 



Boys Track 



Girls Track 



Boys Volleyball 
Boys Lacrosse 

Girls Lacrosse 
Golf 
Cross Country 



Field Hockey 

Boys Soccer 
Girls Soccer 



Tom Woods 
Matt Tuths 
Mark Porcaro 
Varun Chivukula 
Geoff Hackett 

Leaane Grove 
Christie Majkut 
Erin Fitzgerald 
Kristen Marshall 
Jess Egan 

Mike Buswell 

Matt Aronson 
Kevin Hall 
John Swanson 

Kathleen Typadis 

Jeff Cutter 

Zach Nolan 
Steve Lang 
Dan O'Connell 
Siobhan Creedon 
Kristen Marshall 

Lauren Carey 
Mary Benoit 

Alex Hinga 

Steph Pickering 



Philip Kiley 
Alex Hinga 
Dan Moss 
Brent Aigler 



Jackie Wade 
Robin Bauer 
Kate Goltz 
Amy Skerry 



Luke Aronson 
Greg Casey 
Charlie Gryska 

Marigny Mulock 



Matt Tuths 
Leon Davis 

Julie Zaia 



Katie Hiltz 

Geoff Hackett 
Kate Daley 



Football 



Volleyball (Girls) 



Phil Kiley 
Ryan Policella 
Kevin Lynch 
Catherine Burrell 
Molly Barrett 



Bryan Lee 
Matt Reardon 
AJ. Burrell 
Lauren Barrett 



146 



Our cheering teams under the guidance Georganne Gerlach were, as always, talented and 
creative. Our cheerleaders contribute to the athletic program's success by providing 
leadership, support and much enthusiasm to our teams, spectators and community. Year 
after year, their cheering and dance routines are without equal in the Tri-Valley League. 
Our Thanksgiving game rally, and bon fire was cancelled due to a torrential rain storm. 
We did, however, play our annual alumni touch football tournament. 

This concludes my annual report as the Director of Athletics. On behalf of all the 
Warriors, I would like to thank the School Committee, the administration, the Medfield 
School Boosters and the community for all of their support throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jon Kirby 

Director of Athletics 



147 



REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD COMMUNITY 
EDUCATION PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The Medfield Community Education Program changed directors and expanded its 
offerings during this past year. Richard De Young retired as director and Peg Mongiello 
took over the three branches of adult education, after school intramurals and the summer 
enrichment program. 

The Adult Education Program grew tremendously. Starting in the fall, residents could 
take courses in fitness, cooking, photography and finance as well as the traditional 
driver's education program and men's basketball. The focus became what expertise exists 
in our town that Medfield residents can learn from and enjoy. Local restaurants including 
Boca, Basils', Isabella's and Zebra's offered cooking classes and Graceful Stitches led 
knitting classes. The program is looking to expand even more in the spring of 2005 and 
ideas are welcomed as to courses the community members would enjoy. 

The Intramural program involves Dale Street under the direction of Heidi Crable and the 
Blake Middle School under the leadership of Nat Vaughn. Dale Street students enjoyed 
rocket making, homework club, flag football and many different arts and crafts. Blake 
added a seventh grade homework club, knitting and art classes to its program. Many 
students participated in the school play and the sound and light crew as well as the annual 
Lip Sync Competition. Without a gym for most of the year, due to the ongoing 
construction project, many of the usual offerings were cut back but all students are 
awaiting the final move to our own building and a greater expanse of offerings. 

The summer enrichment program had a very successful program under the leadership of 
Kim Estes. Students ages 4-10 enjoyed art, sports and science programs at Wheelock 
School during the month of July. Sign-ups for next summer begin in early May. 

I hope to expand all programs so if you have an idea or can teach or sponsor an activity, 
please contact me at Blake Middle School. Remember to "Expand your Horizons with 
Continuing Education". 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret Mongiello 
Director 






148 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2004 



149 



BIRTHS 2004 








JANUARY 


3/26 


Samuel T Pacheco 


1/6 


Brett W Nickerson 






1/8 


Sophia D Slesar 




APRIL 


1/11 


Henry D Lapham 


4/4 


Patrick J Donovan 


1/11 


Andrew J Scier 


4/6 


Hayden C Gray 


1/12 


Brendan M Mead 


4/7 


Jake D Maloney 


1/15 


Jake C Mewhiney 


4/7 


Isabella L Kiani 


1/15 


Griffin J Stoddard 


4/13 


Michael V Pelkey 


1/16 


Brendan R Coan 


4/16 


Meghan R McCarthy 


1/20 


Madelyn S Bicknell 


4/23 


Grace A Davenport 


1/26 


Jenna H Keteltas 






1/28 


Wesley Matthew Lawson 




MAY 


1/28 


Caleb C Lawson 


5/1 


Maya L Hilvert 


1/29 


Callahan M Foley 


5/1 


Yukiho Yoshida 


1/31 


Tyler J Shu 


5/3 


Maxwell A Augustini 






5/10 


Avery G McKay 




FEBRUARY 


5/11 


Kelsey G Quint 


2/1 


Christopher J Barrett 


5/17 


Samantha F Johnson 


2/3 


Aidan C McCarthy 


5/17 


Luisa O Brooke 


2/3 


Emma G Bannister 


5/20 


Henry T McNaughton 


2/4 


Connor J Hagwood 


5/23 


Chloe A Douglas 


2/5 


Kyle J Canavan 


5/24 


Kayley T Cronin 


2/6 


Megan E Farinacci 


5/27 


Drew T Pezzulo 


2/6 


Aaron B Zapolin 


5/27 


Kirsten C Carlson 


2/9 


Samuel S Levine 






2/14 


Samantha R Kerivan 




JUNE 


2/15 


Sandra Lynn Bisson 


6/1 


Dominic J Nunziato 


2/21 


Mira G Allen 


6/3 


Katherine A Waters 


2/22 


Audrey M Plumb 


6/5 


Alison E Reddy 


2/23 


Julia G Wilson 


6/8 


Ryan E McNeil 


2/25 


Liza E Young 


6/10 


Isabella M Brown 


2/25 


Sophie K Young 


6/11 


Abigail L Witham 


2/26 


Jake H Mangini 


6/11 


Henry F Reilly 






6/19 


Caroline M Driscoll 




MARCH 


6/24 


Anna E Gelormini 


3/1 


Leigh M Einbinder 


6/28 


Ryan J Dolan 


3/1 


John C Schroter 






3/2 


Nora T Devlin 




JULY 


3/15 


Hannah A Johnson 


7/4 


John F Collins 


3/16 


Morgan Q Reilly 


7/6 


William B Perachi 


3/17 


Lucy A Wiklund 


7/8 


Charles S Goldthwait 


3/17 


Maxwell T Sherman 


7/12 


Isaac C Aldrich 


3/19 


Brooke E Hunsaker 


7/15 


Sarah E Desisto 


3/25 


Dominic A Bartolotta 


7/15 


Christopher C Sullivan 



150 



David K Sullivan 
Thomas C Shurtleff 
Brett M Driscoll 
Peyton A Leonard 
Caleb S Garverich 
Casey R Deignan 

AUGUST 

Victoria D Vaciloto 
Colin P Anastos 
Andrew H Stanfield 
Kevin J Arthur 
Tyler E Holm 
Daniel P Morrill 
Daniel J Knapp 
Sophia M Bruno 
Elizabeth G Lynch 
Rebecca W Graham 
Vanessa S Kourtis 
Elli J Langton 



11/29 


Anne M Spaeth 


11/30 


Jack D Didomenico 




DECEMBER 


12/3 


Bridget M Fessenden 


12/12 


Bryanna R Magee 


12/20 


Sophia C Priovolos 


12/20 


William C Bowen 


12/21 


Taegan N Matthew 


12/28 


Christopher J Merageas 



SEPTEMBER 

Isabella C Bradbury 
Jordan E Giunta 
Gianna D Pentland 
Wilson J Syrek 
Brooke M Ingram 
Julia C Fowler 
Whitney H Welch 
Maeve C O'Hara 

OCTOBER 

Turner C Rayment 
Evan D Grodzicki 
Johanna H Brooslin 
Carter H Depiero 
Amanda M Gemski 
Nicolas J Caro 
Anna I Puntonio 
Harper R Foscaldo 

NOVEMBER 

Zoe M Zilinski 
Madeline F Rothstein 
Chloe K Hunt 
Josie N Robinette 



151 



MARRIAGES 2004 





JANUARY 


7/4 


David A Parsons 


1/7 


Jason M Roman 




Elizabeth A Palmieri 




Jennifer F Johnston 


7/31 


Jamie M Croke 


1/7 


Haidar M Fawaz 
Fadwa S SouFan 




Michael C Fleming 
AUGUST 




FEBRUARY 


8/7 


John K Gagliani 


2/21 


Robert C George, Jr 




John R Cassinari 




Kristin G Miller 


8/14 


Shawn F McCormick 


2/27 


Elton D Crespo 




Jeanne M Harney 




Kristen J Vieira 


8/19 


Ismar DeSouza 
Eliete Lourenco 




MARCH 


8/20 


Jeremy T Marsette 


3/27 


Gerard P Canelli, Jr 
Lexie K Short 




Elizabeth B Reiber 
SEPTEMBER 




MAY 


9/12 


Nancer H Ballard 


5/29 


Sandra M Uhlig 




Susan T Ballantyne 




Elizabeth M Blaicher 


9/18 


Paul M Hostovsky 


5/29 


Brooks D Johnson 




Sheri A Covington 




Naida E Snipas 


9/18 


Todd M Mack 


5/29 


Brian S Davis 




Kristin N Sartwell 




Erin C Harrington 


9/24 


Patrick R Arnold 


5/30 


Lee Rothstein 
Andrea I Balsamo 




Katherine D Beard 


5/30 


Lisa M Quintiliani 




OCTOBER 




Christopher C Smith 


10/1 


MaryAnn T Daly 
Gregory T Coppolino 




JUNE 


10/2 


Christopher J Allan 


6/5 


Kenneth J Gordon 




Patricia A Harrington 




Dina M Ciarimboli 


10/9 


Garrett W Larkin 


6/11 


Amy B Manning 




Heather L Letteney 




David S Dusseault 


10/10 


Alison S McConchie 


6/12 


Matthew J Johnson 




Robert M Currie 




Sheryl A Dumas 


10/16 


Domenic A Dicicco 


6/26 


Eric A Maw 




Elizabeth A Thornton 




Deborah A DeVasto 


10/16 


Daniel W Warren IV 


6/26 


William J McHale H 




Erika D Zaniewski 




Debra A Runci 


10/17 


Patrick O'Reilly 
Jennifer A Flynn 




JULY 


10/22 


Janet S Tremlett 


7/3 


Lindsay A Rose 




Mark R Zudeck 




Michael B Nozzolilo 


10/23 


Kathleen A Wickham 
Michael E Alf 



152 



NOVEMBER 

11/20 Robert SOster 

Christina K Giovannes 
11/26 Thomas FHealy 

Mary C DeMello 

DECEMBER 

12/15 Kenneth Bogue 

Elizabeth A Bonnet 

12/19 Hilary SZiven 

Kathleen S Pittman 

12/31 Scott W Bernard 

Diana M McGowen 



153 



DEATHS 2004 








JANUARY 




JUNE 


1/6 


Norman R Curtis 


6/19 


William D Jones 


1/7 


Eleanor A Snow 


6/11 


George P Winn 


1/7 


Michael J Mills 


6/14 


Lucy P Lee 


1/8 


Theodore Prager 


6/20 


Kathryn K Gerrie 


1/14 


Lise Gericke 


6/22 


Emily R Spencer 


1/16 


Margaret T Tsebetzis 


6/24 


Richard F Farkas 


1/17 


Vera Bergstrom 






1/23 


Mary H Clifford 




JULY 


1/29 


David R Petrie 


7/4 


Felix Y Martin 


1/29 


Alda N Becker 


7/9 


John P O'Neill 


1/30 


Marjorie B Meaney 


7/14 


Rawson R Cowen, Jr 






7/29 


Warner W Wayne, Jr 




FEBRUARY 






2/8 


Loretta A McKeon 




AUGUST 


2/22 


Joseph G Needle 


8/7 


Kathleen L Schofield 






8/8 


Grace Oprandi 




MARCH 


8/12 


Julio C Florian 


3/4 


Helen E Mandell 


8/13 


Malcolm A Robbins 


3/5 


Donald J Brown 


8/20 


Mark Gavin 


3/6 


Joan Harvey 


8/23 


Jacqueline M Capen 


3/23 


Frances M Whiting 


8/25 


George G Lorantos 


3/24 


John C Murphy 


8/29 


Carl J Brewer 


3/30 


Frederick Coffin 


8/31 


Elspet R Thayer 




APRIL 




SEPTEMBER 


4/2 


Jane E Leach 


9/2 


Harold S Mott 


4/9 


Ralph A Baker 


9/5 


Donna M Hesnan 


4/13 


Marian Sprague 


9/15 


Francis E Teague 


4/17 


Leslie J Howlett 


9/17 


Raymond E Lord 


4/20 


Shirley A Smallfield 


9/20 


Fred P Quatromoni 


4/26 


John G Semeraro, Jr 


9/29 


Anne M Korites 




MAY 




OCTOBER 


5/3 


Emma C Kramer 


10/17 


Michael E Pendleton 


5/5 


Harry R Brown 


10/23 


Mabelle E Maguire 


5/9 


Elaine R Taylor 


10/23 


Walter A Carlson 


5/12 


William J McGivery 


10/25 


Charles F Cox 


5/15 


William F McNamara, Jr 


10/26 


Alfred N Colella 


5/21 


Marilyn D Duncan 






5/22 


Mabel E Coffin 




NOVEMBER 


5/29 


Verna A Hain 


11/1 


Sandra J Coomber 






11/3 


Kenneth F Sears 






11/8 


Lucy K Rusconi 



154 



11/16 


Marie B Frawley 


11/21 


Thelma M Powell 


11/23 


Eleanor J Loomis 


11/26 


Eric M Perkins 




DECEMBER 


12/5 


Vivian M Scanlon 


12/8 


John F Carmichael 


12/12 


John J Belmont 


12/23 


Paul E DeChellis 


12/29 


Florence A Maclntyre 



155 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

WARRANT FOR PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

March 2, 2004 

Norfolk, SS 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield who are qualified to vote in Primaries to vote at 
Precincts 1, 2, 3, 4 at the Ralph Wheelock School Gym, Elm Street, on TUESDAY, 
THE SECOND DAY OF MARCH, 2004 from 6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the 
following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the Presidential Primary for the candidates of political parties for 
the following offices: 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

STATE COMMITTEE MAN BRISTOL & NORFOLK 

STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN BRISTOL & NORFOLK 

WARD OR TOWN COMMITTEE MEDFIELD 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of election aforesaid. Given unto our hands this 3rd 
day of February in the year Two Thousand Four. 

Ann B. Thompson S\ 

Osier Peterson S\ 

Paul Rhuda S\ 

SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of the same at five public places seven days before the date 
of the meeting as within directed. 

Constable: Kevin Robinson S\ 
Date: February 9, 2004 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 
Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC S\ 
Town Clerk 



156 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

March 2, 2004 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with the swearing 
in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in 
working order, specimen ballots posted, voting precincts listing displayed and instruction 
to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 
ASSISTANT WARDEN: Al Allegretto 

ELECTION OFFICERS: Andy Thompson, John McGowan, Joan Bussow, Ruth Chick, 
Phyllis Wilmarth, Emmy Mitchell, Missy Cavanaugh, Gerry Finn, Kathy Lee, Leo 
Surette, Joanne Surette, Jane Timmerman, Sandy Williams, Michael Costa, Herb 
Williams and Bob Hirtle 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 1,589 - 1,519 Republicans; 1,493 Democrats; 26 Libertarians; 17 
Green-Rainbow. Total Registered Voters numbered 7,782 - 20% of the voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 



REPUBLICAN BALLOTS 


1 


PRECINCT 
2 2 4 






TOTAL 


PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 












George W. Bush 


78 


58 


74 


83 


293 


No Preference 


2 


6 


7 


12 


27 


Write In 











1 


1 


Blanks 


3 


3 


1 


2 


9 
330 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 












William E. Adams 


76 


63 


80 


89 


308 


Matthew P Keswick 


1 


1 





1 


3 


Write In 

















Blanks 


6 


3 


2 


8 


19 
330 


STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 












Danielle Fish 


2 











2 


Write In 








1 


1 


2 


Blanks 


81 


67 


81 


97 


326 
330 


TOWN COMMITTEE 












James S Wakely 


50 


42 


48 


57 


197 


Mabelle E Maguire 


52 


43 


47 


58 


200 



157 



William E Adams 


68 


54 


65 


76 


263 


Stephen W Fosdick 


49 


40 


45 


59 


193 


Gino R Mariani 


51 


42 


46 


60 


199 


Write In 


2 





1 


1 


4 


Blanks 


2633 


2124 


2618 


3119 


10494 
11550 


DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS 












PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 












Richard Gephardt 


1 


1 


1 


1 


4 


Joseph Lieberman 


2 


3 


4 


3 


12 


Wesley Clark 





1 


2 


1 


4 


Howard Dean 


3 


10 


9 


4 


26 


Carol M Braun 








1 





1 


John Edwards 


69 


86 


56 


67 


278 


Dennis Kucinich 


9 


9 


5 


11 


34 


John F Kerry 


214 


221 


249 


187 


871 


Lyndon H Larouche 





1 








1 


Al Sharpton 


3 


2 


3 


2 


10 


No Preference 


2 


3 


2 


2 


9 


Write In 


2 











2 


Blanks 


3 


1 





1 


5 
1257 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 












William R Keating 


226 


251 


249 


205 


931 


Write In 


1 


4 








5 


Blanks 


81 


83 


83 


74 


321 
1257 


STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 












Claire B Naughton 


209 


230 


239 


192 


870 


Write In 

















Blanks 


99 


108 


93 


87 


387 
1257 


TOWN COMMITTEE 












Sean P Teehan 


172 


161 


199 


143 


675 


Robert Morrill 


163 


144 


170 


123 


600 


Paul Hinkley 


204 


189 


195 


153 


741 


Eileen DeSorgher 


208 


211 


224 


191 


834 


Rachel D Harrison 


164 


148 


170 


125 


607 


Maureen M Lifsitz 


174 


161 


175 


132 


642 


Thomas Sweeney 


185 


176 


183 


144 


688 


Lee D Alinsky 


159 


148 


176 


126 


609 


William Dunlea 


176 


163 


190 


148 


677 


Robert Luttman 


177 


157 


182 


133 


649 


Albert P Roderick 


162 


146 


167 


124 


599 


Robert Finn 


29 


45 


36 


38 


148 



158 



Write In 


3 


3 


1 





7 


Blanks 


8804 


9978 


9552 


8185 


36519 
43995 


LIBERTARIAN BALLOTS 












PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 




Jeffrey Diket 

















Ruben Perez 

















Aaron Russo 

















Michael Badnarik 

















Garry Nolan 


1 





1 





2 


Write In 

















Blanks 















2 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 












Blanks 


1 





1 





2 
2 


STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 












Blanks 


1 





1 





2 
2 



NO GREEN RAINBOW BALLOTS 
CAST 

Polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets were 
turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping, as prescribed by law. 



A TRUE COPY ATTEST: March 4, 2004 

Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 



159 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 

MARCH 29, 2004 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 
ASST. WARDEN: Angelo Allegretto 

TELLERS: Andy Thompson, John McGowan, Tony Centore, Ruth Chick, Phyllis 
Wilmarth, Emmy Mitchell, Joanne Kunz, Missy Cavanaugh, Patricia Rioux, Gerry 
Finn, Rita Allegretto, Jane Timmerman,, Sandy Williams, Mike Costa, Bob Hirtle, 
Leo Surette and Joanne Surette 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 369. There are 7,776 registered voters, 4% of voters voting. 







PRECINCT 






1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


MODERATOR (one yr) VOTE FOR ONE 












Scott F. McDermott 


86 


78 


74 


87 


325 


Write In 














o 


Blanks 


12 


7 


16 


9 


44 
369 


SELECTMEN (three yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 












Ann B. Thompson 


67 


69 


64 


75 


275 


Write In 


6 


2 


2 


1 


11 


Blanks 


25 


14 


24 


20 


83 
369 


ASSESSOR (three yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 












R. Edward Beard 


67 


54 


54 


56 


231 


Write In 


1 


2 





2 


5 


Blanks 


30 


29 


36 


38 


133 
369 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE (three yrs) VOTE 












FOR NOT MORE THAN TWO 












Steven E. Kramer 


78 


61 


70 


72 


281 


Carolyn P. Casey 


73 


67 


66 


76 


282 


Write In 


3 











3 


Blanks 


42 


42 


44 


44 


172 



160 



738 



LIBRARY TRUSTEE (three yrs) VOTE FOR 
NOT MORE THAN TWO 



Robert Luttman 


80 


69 


69 


76 


294 


James J. Whalen 


82 


78 


73 


83 


316 


Write In 

















Blanks 


34 


23 


38 


33 


128 
738 


PLANNING BOARD (five yrs) VOTE FOR 












ONE 












Elissa Franco 


77 


72 


64 


79 


292 


Write In 

















Blanks 


21 


13 


26 


17 


77 
369 


PARK COMMISSIONERS (three yrs) VOTE 












FOR NOT MORE THAN TWO 












James Landry 


16 


10 


6 


11 


43 


Write In 


2 





4 





6 


Blanks 


178 


160 


170 


181 


689 
738 



HOUSING AUTHORITY (five yrs) VOTE 
FOR 

ONE 
Richard Jordan 
Write In 
Blanks 

TRUST FUND COMMISSIONER (three yrs) 
VOTE FOR ONE 
Steven T. Pelosi 
Write In 
Blanks 



After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets 
were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



81 


80 


67 


80 


308 

















17 


5 


23 


16 


61 
369 


77 


74 


64 


80 


295 


1 











1 


20 


11 


26 


16 


73 
369 



Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 

March 31, 2004 



161 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

APRIL 26, 2004 



Norfolk, ss. 



To the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, Greetings: 
In the Name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs, to meet at 
the Ralph Wheelock School gymnasium, located on Elm Street in said Medfield, on 
MONDAY, the twenty-ninth day of March, A.D., 2004 at 6:00 o'clock A.M., then and 
there to act upon the following articles: 

Article 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator for a term of one year. 

One Selectman, one Assessor, two members of the School Committee, two Trustees of 

the Public Library, two Park and Recreation Commissioners and one Trust Fund 

Commissioner each for a term of three years. 

One member of the Planning Board and one member of the Housing Authority each 

for term of five years. 

The polls will be open at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 o'clock P.M. 

On MONDAY the twenty-sixth of April, A.D., 2004, commencing at 7:30 P.M. the 
following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury School gymnasium, 
located on Pound Street in said Medfield, viz. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the several Town 
Officers for the past year. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/26/2004) 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer/Collector to use all 
means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer/Collector might if elected to that 
office. 

(Treasurer/Collector) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/26/2004) 



162 



Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named sums as 
Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest 
thereof as may be necessary for said care, viz. 
PERPETUAL CARE 

Clifford W. Setterlund $ 2,550.00 

Tanya Chermak 425.00 

Shawn & Cindy Collins 2,550.00 

Margaret Wold 425.00 

Craig & Michelle M.Luhrmann 1 ,700.00 

Richard & Julie Desorgher 1 ,700.00 

James & Kathleen Leonard 1 ,700.00 

Dorothy B. Harpster 550.00 

Clayton Balcom 425.00 

Mildred Willis 3,300.00 



Robert K. McCarthy 1,275.00 

Donald Miller 850.00 

Maria K. Mucciaccio 1,700.00 

M. Arlene Regan 550.00 



$19,400.00 

(Cemetery Commission) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/26/2004) 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, 

Section 

53E Vi to provide for a Fire Alarm revolving fund to be used for fire alarm 

maintenance, equipment or supplies, funds not to exceed $6,500 to come from the 

Maintenance Fee account and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend from said funds, or 

do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/26/2004) 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, 
Section 53E 54 to provide for an Ambulance revolving fund to be used for payment of 
principal and interest costs on the ambulance, funds not to exceed $45,000 to come 
from the Ambulance Mileage Fee Account and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend 
from said funds, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 

163 



It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/26/2004) 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, 

Section 

53E Vi to provide for an Advanced Life Support fund to be used for the payment of 

Advanced Life Support charges, funds not to exceed $30,000 to come from the users 

of said services or their insurers and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend from said 

funds, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/26/2004) 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation of the 
following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Selectmen, Assessors, School 
Committee, Trustees of the Public Library, Park and Recreation Commissioners, 
Planning Board, Housing Authority and Trust Fund Commissioners, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 



Officer 

Town Clerk 

Selectmen, Chairman 

Selectmen, Clerk 

Selectmen, Third Member 

Assessors, Chairman 

Assessors, Clerk 

Assessors, Third Member 

Moderator 

Housing Authority 

School Committee 

Library Trustees 

Planning Board 

Park and Recreation Commissioners 

Trust Fund Commissioners 



(Board of Selectmen) 
It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/26/2004) 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to propose an amendment to the Town Charter 
to be submitted to the voters at the next annual town meeting for the election of 
officers for their approval, pursuant to the Home Rule Procedures Act, G.L. Ch. 43B, 
Sec. 10 and 1 1 as follows: 

Amend Article 6 Other Elective Officers subsection d. to read: 

d. Five park and recreation commissioners for three- year terms. The terms of 
individual members shall be staggered so that at least one, but no more than two 

164 



Present Salarv 


W.C. Recommei 


$42,230 


$44,5 


900 


S 


900 


9 


900 


9 


900 


9 


900 


9 


900 


9 






































expire(s) in any year. Transitional provision: At the 2005 annual election, one of the 
three positions to be then-filled shall be designated a one-year term, conditioned upon 
the voters' approval of this proposed amendment at that time or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Park and Recreation 
Commission) 

VOTED: That the Town Charter to be submitted to the voters at the next annual town 
meeting for the election of officers for their approval, pursuant to the Home Rule 
Procedures Act, G.L. Ch. 43B, Sec. 10 and 1 1 as follows: 

Amend Article 6 Other Elective Officers subsection d. to read: 

d. Five park and recreation commissioners for three-year terms. The terms of 
individual members shall be staggered so that at least one, but no more than two 
expire(s) in any year. Transitional provision: At the 2005 annual election, one of the 
three positions to be then-filled shall be designated a one-year term, conditioned upon 
the voters' approval of this proposed amendment at that time or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. MOTION CARRIES BY 2/3 VOTE (4/27/2004) 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to amend the PERSONNEL 
ADMINISTRATION PLAN and classification of positions and pay schedule, 
effective July 1, 2004, by transferring the Park and Recreation Director's position and 
the Council on Aging Director's position from the Other Salaried Positions category 
to the MANAGERIAL POSITIONS category, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Personnel Board and Warrant 
Committee) 

VOTED: That the Town amend the PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN and 

classification of positions and pay schedule, effective July 1, 2004, by transferring the 

Park and Recreation Director's position and the Council on Aging Director's position 

from the Other Salaried Positions category to the MANAGERIAL POSITIONS 

category. 

MOTION CARRIES (4/26/2004) 

Article 11 To see if the Town will vote to amend the PERSONNEL 
ADMINISTRATION PLAN and CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY 
SCHEDULE, effective July 1, 2004, to read as follows. 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

Minimum Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 

165 



EIGHT STEP PLAN 



Step 6 



Step 7 Step 8 



Animal Control 


$577.81 $596.08 


$613.04 $631.31 


$650.94 


Officer/Inspector 


$670.10 $690.15 
Annually 


$711.11 




Assistant Animal 


$1,688.36 $1,844.90 


$2,001.45 $2,156.94 


$2,316.63 


Control Officer 


$2,473.17 $2,628.66 


$2,815.68 




MANAGERIAL 


Minimum 


Midpoint 


Maximum 


POSITIONS 








Town Administrator 


$77,911 


$97,417 


$121,715 


Police Chief 


$67,991 


$85,045 


$106,334 


Superintendent of Public Works 


$67,991 


$85,045 


$106,334 


Fire Chief 


$63,533 


$79,471 


$99,311 


Treasurer/Collector 


$55,508 


$69,440 


$83,261 


Library Director 


$63,533 


$79,471 


$99,311 


Administrative Assistant 


$42,355 


$52,944 


$63,533 


Town Accountant 


$48,486 


$60,635 


$72,784 


Assistant Town Administrator 


$48,486 


$60,635 


$72,784 


Deputy Assessor 


$42,355 


$52,944 


$63,533 


Other Salaried Positions 








Park and Recreation Director 


$42,355 


$52,944 


$63,533 


Detached Social Worker 


$34,587 


$43,247 


$51,829 


Children's Librarian 


$34,587 


$43,247 


$51,829 


Council on Aging Director 


$34,587 


$43,247 


$51,829 


Part-time Salaried Positions 


Minimum 


Midpoint 


Maximum 


Human Resource Representative 


$16,162 


$20,174 


$24,299 


Conservation Agent 


$16,162 


$20,174 


$24,299 



Minimum wage $6.75 per hour. Lower rates as authorized by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts may also be paid. 



166 



GR 


min 


S2 


S3 


S4 


S5 


S6 


S7 


MAX 


1 


8.36 


8.89 


9.19 


9.49 


9.76 


10.07 


10.36 


10.63 


2 


9.11 


9.37 


9.64 


9.94 


10.22 


10.55 


10.85 


11.17 


3 


9.57 


9.86 


10.15 


10.47 


10.79 


11.09 


11.41 


11.78 


4 


10.08 


10.37 


10.68 


10.99 


11.34 


11.69 


12.03 


12.40 


5 


10.63 


10.97 


11.31 


11.64 


12.00 


12.32 


12.70 


13.01 


6 


11.17 


11.48 


11.82 


12.18 


12.55 


12.93 


13.31 


13.72 


7 


11.78 


12.02 


12.51 


12.88 


13.28 


13.67 


14.08 


14.44 


8 


12.41 


12.75 


13.14 


13.54 


13.94 


14.37 


14.80 


15.24 


9 


13.01 


13.40 


13.80 


14.22 


14.64 


15.08 


15.55 


16.03 


10 


13.72 


14.13 


14.54 


14.99 


15.43 


15.92 


16.40 


16.88 


11 


14.44 


14.89 


15.32 


15.79 


16.28 


16.76 


17.25 


17.77 


12 


15.18 


15.62 


16.09 


16.61 


17.10 


17:61 


18.13 


18.68 


13 


16.03 


16.51 


17.00 


17.55 


18.07 


18.61 


19.18 


19.74 


14 


16.84 


17.34 


17.89 


18.42 


18.97 


19.55 


20.12 


20.72 


15 


17.77 


18.34 


18.89 


19.45 


20.04 


20.64 


21.27 


21.90 


16 


18.67 


19.24 


19.80 


20.40 


21.01 


21.65 


22.29 


22.96 


17 


19.65 


20.25 


20.87 


21.48 


22.13 


22.80 


23.47 


24.19 


18 


20.68 


21.31 


21.96 


22.62 


23.29 


24.00 


24.71 


25.46 


19 


21.73 


22.38 


23.05 


23.75 


24.46 


25.19 


25.95 


26.72 


20 


22.81 


23.49 


24.20 


24.92 


25.67 


26.43 


27.23 


28.05 


21 


23.94 


24.67 


25.40 


26.16 


26.95 


27.76 


28.59 


29.45 


22 


25.13 


25.91 


26.69 


27.48 


28.31 


29.15 


30.03 


30.93 



167 



Grade 1 

Page 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 
Grade 13 

Light Equipment Operator 



Grade 2 

Presently No Positions 

Grade 3 

Presently No Positions 

Grade 4 

Presently No Positions 

Grade 5 
Mini-bus Driver 



Grade 14 

Heavy Equipment Operator 
Water Technician 
Wastewater Treatment Operator 
Administrative Secretary 
Groundskeeper 

Grade 15 

Reference Librarian 

Finance Data Processing Supervisor 

Equipment Operator Repairman 



Grade 6 

Clerk Typist 

Grade 7 

Skilled Laborer 

Grade 8 

Library Assistant 

Grade 9 

Secretary 

Sr. Library Assistant 
Special Police Officer 
Permanent Intermittent 
Police Matron 
Traffic Supervisor 

Grade 10 

Collector/Bookkeeper/Secretary 

Grade 11 

Truck driver 

Grade 12 

Outreach Worker (CO A) 
Custodian 



Grade 16 

Sr. Heavy Equipment Operator 

Sr. Administrative Secretary 

Sr. Groundskeeper 

Sr. Water Operator/Repairman 

Tree Warden 

Insect Pest Control 

Call Firefighter 

Firefighter EMT 

Grade 17 

Asst. Wastewater Treatment Oper-in-Chg. 
Asst. Water Operator-in-Charge 
Sr. Equipment Operator/Repairman 

Grade 18 

Presently no positions 

Grade 19 

Wastewater Treatment Operator-in-Charge 
Street/Water/Sewer Foreman 

Grade 20 

Senior Foreman 

Sr. Wastewater Treatment Operator-in-Charge 



168 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS- PART TIME/TEMPORARY 



Veterans Agent 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Registrar, Clerk 

Registrar 

Police Intern 



Annually 

$6,122 

$2,085 

$1,206 

$154 

Weekly 

$358 to $485 



Police- Private Special Detail 
Tree Climber 
Library Page 



Hourly 

$26.08 

$17.08 

$8.36 to $10.97 



FIRE 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Fire Alarm Superintendent 



Annually 

$3,144 

$1,886 

$1,509 

$654 

$654 



INSPECTORS 



$24.42 per inspection 



Inspector of Buildings 
Local Inspector of Buildings 
Gas Inspector 
Assistant Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Assistant Plumbing Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Assistant Wiring Inspector 
Zoning Enforcement Officer 
Street Inspector 



Annual Minimum 

$4,720 

$633 

$1,301 

$239 

$3,857 

$885 

$2,147 

$633 

$24.42 per inspection 

12.85 per hour 



PARK AND RECREATION 
Program Director 
Swim Pond Director 
Swim Pond Assistant Director 
Swim Team Coach/Guard 
Assistant Coach/Guard 



Annually 
$12,430 to $14,817 
$5,177 to $7,1 11 
$3,453 to $4,742 
$2,876 to $4,149 
$1,842 to $3,201 



169 



Water Safety Instructor $2, 1 87 to $3,201 

Lifeguard $2,082 to $2,963 j| 

Swim Pond Badge Checker $69 1 to $ 1 ,067 

Swim Pond Maintenance $806 to $ 1 ,067 

Swim Pond Set-up Workers $575 to $2,371 

Camp Director $2,302 to $4,537 

Camp Specialists $ 1 , 1 5 1 to $4,490 

Counselors $921 to $2,371 

Jr. Counselor $230 to $712 

Tennis Director $3,453 to $4,742 

Tennis Instructor $69 1 to $ 1 , 1 86 

Trainee $6.92 

or do or act anything in relation there to. 

(Personnel Board) 

VOTED: That Article 11, the PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN AND 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITINS AND PAY SCHEDULE be approved effective 
July 1, 2004 to read as set forth in the warrant, except that in Grade 9 of the 
HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS, on page 27 of the Warrant Report, the position of 
Bus Driver be added. MOTION CARRIES (4/27/2004) 

Article 12. To see if the Town will vote, in accordance with the provisions of G.L., 
Chapter 32B, Section 2, as amended by Chapter 46, Section 12 of the Acts of 2003 to 
authorize members of the call fire department and other volunteer emergency service 
agencies serving the Town to be considered employees for the purpose of providing 
health insurance, provided that the Town shall charge such individuals 100 percent of 
the premium, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 

It was so VOTED (4/27/2004) BY MAJORITY 

Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 26, Article II-TOWN 
ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE in the TOWN OF MEDFIELD BYLAWS by 
adding the words "with the exception of the Fire Alarm Revolving Account" in the 
second sentence, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 

VOTED: That the Town amend Section 26, Article II-TOWN ADMINISTRATION 
AND FINANCE in the TOWN OF MEDFIELD BYLAWS by adding the words 
"with the exception of the Fire Alarm Revolving Account" in the second sentence. 
ARTICLE PASSES (4/26/2004) 



170 



Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or transfer from 
available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other Town Officer, 
Board, Commission or Committee to defray operating expenses of the Town for the 
fiscal year commencing July 1, 2004, or such other sums as the Town may determine 
as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

MOTION TO AMEND: Increase Assessors Operations 01-141-2 to $71,636. 
AMENDMENT CARRIES (4/27/2004) 

MOTION TO AMEND: Increase Treasurer/Collector Operations 01-145-2 to 
$65,669. AMENDMENT CARRIES (4/27/2004) 

MOTION TO AMEND: Increase Park & Recreation Operations 01-630-2 to 
$138,804. AMENDMENT FAILS (4/27/2004) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate the sum of $39,913,400 to defray the operating 
expenses of the various Town boards, Committees, Commissions and Departments as 
printed in the Warrant Report and/or as amended by this Town Meeting for the fiscal 
year commencing July 1, 2004 and that to meet said appropriation the following sums 
be raised and appropriated on the fiscal 2005 tax levy or transferred from accounts or 
funds as follows: 

$37,019,186 -Tax Levy 

300,000 - Stabilization Fund 
280,648 - Bond Premiums 
38,000 - Cemetery Perpetual Care Interest Account 
31,200 - Ambulance Revolving Fund 
1,130,323 - Water Enterprise Fund 
1,1 14,043 - Sewer Enterprise fund 

MOTION CARRIES (4/27/2004) 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate from the Fiscal 2005 
Tax Levy and/or transfer from available and/or borrow for Capital Expenditures 
including the following: 

DEPARTMENT PROJECT 

Board of Selectmen Website and E-Govemment 

Downtown Study 

Open Space Committee Future Land Acquisition 

Treasurer/Collector Collection Software Package 

171 



Assessors 



Park and Recreation 



Fire Department 



School Department 

Wheelock 



Dale Street 



Maintenance System-wide 



Police Department 



Public Works 



Water Enterprise Fund 



Assessing Software Conversion 

Irrigation McCarthy Park 

Safety Netting at McCarthy Park 

Fences at McCarthy Park 

Warning track on 2 softball fields McCarthy Park 

Bleachers at McCarthy Park 

Roof Replacement 
Protective Clothing 



Overlay existing tiles (2 corridors) 
Phone System Replacement 

Upgrade Restrooms #Toilets 
Paving lot/Driveway/Lines 
Overlay Existing Tiles 
Phone System Replacement 

Pick Up Truck with Plow 

Replace 1 cruisers w/1 Ford LTD marked cruisers 
Upgrade 3 State Condemned holding cells 
Storage 

Subdivision Resurfacing 

Sidewalk Plow 

Cemetery GIS 

Town Garage Roof Replacement 

10 Wheel Mack Dump Truck (2nd Half) 

Water System Vulnerability Assessment 

Water Management Plan 



And that the Board of Selectmen and/or the Treasurer/Collector and/or the Board of 
Assessors and/or the Park and Recreation Commission and/or the Fire Department 
and/or the School Committee and/or the Police Department and/or the Public Works 
Department and/or the Water & Sewerage Board be further authorized to contract with 
and otherwise deal with any federal and state agencies for reimbursement of the cost 



172 



of any capital expenditure; and to trade and/or sell toward part of the purchase price 
the following: 

DEPARTMENT TRADE-IN OR SELL 

Police One Cruiser 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Capital Budget Committee) 
VOTED: That the Town Appropriate the sum of $441,500 for capital expenditures, 
as recommended in the Warrant Report and/or as amended by this Town Meeting, and 
that to meet this appropriation the following sums be raised on the Fiscal 2005 tax 
levy and/or transferred from available funds: 

$316,766 -Tax Levy 

21,000 - Unexpended Appropriation Funds ATM 1999, Article 13 
6,688 - STM 1995 Land acquisition Janes Avenue 
1 1,945 - STM 2000, Land acquisition Hinkley Property 

100 - Police Cruiser Trade In Value 
5,000 - Police Insurance Settlement for Cruiser 
80,000 - Water Enterprise fund 
124,734 - TOTAL ADDITIONAL FUNDS 
$441,500 - TOTAL CAPITAL BUDGET 

And that the Board of Selectmen and/or the Treasurer/Collector and/or the Board of 
Assessors and/or the Park and Recreation Commission and/or the fire Department 
and/or the School Committee and/or the Police Department and/or the Public Works 
Department and/or the Water & Sewerage Board be further authorized to contract with 
and otherwise deal with any federal and state agencies for reimbursement of the cost 
of any capital expenditure; and to trade and/or sell toward part of the purchase price 
the following: 

DEPARTMENT TRADE-IN OR SELL 

Police One Cruiser 



173 



FY05 CAPITAL BUDGET 



DEPARTMENT 
Board of Selectmen 

Open Space Committee 

Treasurer/Collector 

Assessors 

Park and Recreation 



Fire Department 



School Department 

Wheelock 



Dale Street 



Maintenance 
Systemwide 



Public Works 



PROJECT 

Website and E-Government 
Downtown Study 

Future Land Acquisition 

Collection Software Package 

Assessing Software Conversion 

Irrigation McCarthy Pary 
Safety Netting at McCarthy Park 
Fences at McCarthy Park 
Warning track on 2 softball fields 
McCarthy Park 
Bleachers at McCarthy Park 

Roof Replacement 
Protective Clothing 



Overlay existing tiles (2 corridors) 
Phone System Replacement 

Upgrade Restrooms #Toilets 
Paving lot/Driveway/Lines 
Overlay Existing Tiles 
Phone System Replacement 

Pick Up Truck with Plow 



REQUEST APPROPRIATED 



$20,000 


$0 


$30,000 


$20,000 


$25,000 


$5,000 


$35,000 


$0 


$50,000 


$70,000 


$30,000 


$0 


$5,000 


$5,000 


$10,000 


$10,000 


$10,000 


$0 



$5,000 



$31,000 



$0 



$30,000 
$24,000 


$30,000 
$0 


$35,000 
$27,000 


$0 
$0 


$58,000 
$35,000 
$35,000 
$27,000 


$58,000 
$0 
$0 
$0 



$0 



Replace 1 cruisers w/1 Ford LTD 


$28,890 


$29,000 


marked cruisers 






Upgrade 3 State Condemned 


$25,000 


$10,000 


holding cells 






Storage 


$9,000 


$0 


Subdivision Resurfacing 


$30,000 


$25,000 


Sidewalk Plow 


$84,000 




1999 Cemetery GIS 


$21,000 


$21,000 


Town Garage Roof Replacement 


$41,000 


$21,000 



174 



10 Wheel Mack Dump Truck (2nd 


$57,500 


$57,500 


Half) 






Enterprise Fund Water System Vulnerability 


$30,000 


$30,000 


Assessment 






Enterprise Fund Water Management Plan 


$50,000 


$50,000 



TOTAL S898390 $441,500 



To be funded by: 



Tax Levy 


$316,766 


Unexpended Appropriation Funds 




ATM 1999, Article 13 


$21,000 


STM 1995, Land acquisition Janes 


$6,688 


Avenue 




STM 2000, Land acquisition 


$11,945 


Hinkley Property 




Police Cruiser Trade In Value 


$100 


Police Insurance Settlement for 


$5,000 


Cruiser 




Water Enterprise Fund 


$80,000 


TOTAL ADDITIONAL FUNDS 


$124,734 



TOTAL CAPITAL BUDGET $441,500 

MOTION CARRIES (4/26/2004) 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of section four of 
Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 providing for an additional exemption for a taxpayer 
who shall otherwise qualify for an exemption under clauses 17C, 22, 22A, 22B, 22C. 
22D, 22E, 37A, 41C, 42 or 43 of section five of Chapter 59 of the General Laws, 
which shall be uniform for all exemptions and none of which shall exceed one 
hundred per cent of said exemption for which he qualifies; provided, however, that in 
no instance shall the taxable valuation of such property, after all applicable 
exemptions, be reduced below ten percent of its full and fair cash valuation except 
through the application of section 8 A of Chapter 58 or clause 18 of section 5 of 
Chapter 59 of the General Laws and provided further, that the additional exemption 
shall not result in any taxpayer paying less than the taxes paid in the preceding fiscal 
year except through the application of section 8 A of Chapter 58 or clause 18 of section 
5 of chapter 59 of the General Laws. The provisions of this section shall apply to the 
fiscal year 2005, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

It was so VOTED (Consent Calendar 4/26/2004) 



175 



(Board of Assessors) 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the General 
Court for special Home Rule legislation authorizing the Board of Selectmen to 
establish an interest rate different from that set by General Laws Chapter 59, Sec. 5, 
Clause 41 A, as amended, for those persons eligible for a deferral of their real property 
tax liability, effective for tax years starting with fy2005, such rate to be the lower of (i) 
the prime rate as of the first business day of July of each respective fiscal year as 
published in the Wall Street Journal or (ii) eight percent (8%). 
MOTION CARRIES (4/26/2004) 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of hiring consultants and 
conducting studies in connection with the re-use of the former Medfield State Hospital 
property, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

MOTION TO AMEND: Move to amend Article 18, as read by the Warrant 
Committee by inserting a comma and the words "SPECIFICALLY INCLUDING 
EXAMINATION OF THE FEASIBILITY OF THE TOWN BUYING ALL OR A 
PORTION OF THE PROPERTY" after the phrase former Medfield State Hospital 
Property. 

AMENDMENT PASSED BY MAJORITY VOTE (4/27/2004) 

MOTION TO AMEND: Move to amend Article 18 as amended, by inserting after 
the phrase all or a portion of the property, the words "said studies to include the 
possibility of constructing a golf course, age restricted housing and such other creative 
uses that might preserve open space, reduce the impact on our schools and other Town 
services, and/or provide additional tax revenues." 

AMENDMENT FAILED (4/27/2004) 

MOTION TO AMEND: To change the amount of $35,000 to $1.00. 
ADMENDMENT FAILED (4/27/2004) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate $35,000, said sum to be raised on the tax levy, 
for the purpose of hiring consultants and conducting studies in connection with the re- 
use of the former Medfield State Hospital property, specifically including examination 
of the feasibility of the Town buying all or a portion of the property, and that the 
Board of Selectmen be authorized to apply for grants and/or loans from federal, state 
and/or private agencies to accomplish said purpose. MOTION PASSED 
(4/27/2004) 



176 



Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to amend the TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
BYLAW, ARTICLE XIV HISTORIC DISTRICT, as amended, to add the Wight- 
Allen Historic District by approving the attached amendment to the official Historic 
District map, and by adding to SECTION 3. Historic District Boundaries , a new 
district to read as follows: 

Wight- Allen Historic District 

The boundaries are hereby established as shown on the official Historic 
District map, as amended, filed with the Massachusetts Historical Commission on 
April 23, 2004 and also filed with the Town Clerk and recorded at the Norfolk County 
Registry of Deeds, which map accompanies and is hereby declared to be a part of this 
bylaw. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Historical Commission) 

MOTION TO AMEND: Article 19 by adding the following at the end of the Article, 
provided, however, that if the owner of any property shown on the official Historic 
District map desires not to have his or her property within the Wight- Allen Historic 
District, then such owner may file, within Ninety (90) days following the date hereof, 
a notice with the Medfield Historic District Commission signifying their desire to have 
their property removed from the official Historic District map, with a copy of such 
notice filed with the Town Clerk and recorded at the Norfolk County Registry of 
Deeds. Upon the filing and recording of such notice, the property that is the subject of 
the notice shall be deemed removed from the Historic District map." MOTION DID 
NOT PASS (4/26/2004) 

MOTION TO DISMISS THIS ARTICLE: MOTION DOES NOT CARRY 

(4/26/2004) 

THIS ARTICLE DID NOT PASS BY 2/3 VOTE 368 YES 337 NO 

(4/26/2004) 

MOTION TO RECONSIDER THIS ARTICLE: DENIED BY THE 
MODERATOR (4/27/2004) 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to amend the TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
BYLAW, ARTICLE XIV HISTORIC DISTRICT, as amended, to expand the John 
Metcalf Historic District by approving the attached amendment to the official Historic 
District map, which identifies the new boundaries and by striking from the John 
Metcalf Historic District in SECTION 3 Historic District Boundaries, the date April 
29, 1996 and substituting in place thereof the date February 4, 2004. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Historical Commission) 



177 



VOTED: That the Town amend the TOWN OF MEDFIELD BYLAW, ARTICLE 
XIV HISTORIC DISTRICT, as amended, to expand the John Metcalf Historic District 
by approving the attached amendment to the official Historic District map, copies of 
which have been posted and made available at this Town Meeting, which identifies the 
new boundaries and by amending the John Metcalf Historic District in SECTION 3 
Historic District Boundaries, to read: 

The boundaries are hereby established as shown on the official Historic 
District Map filed, as most recently amended, with the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission on April 23, 2004, and also filed with the Town Clerk and recorded at 
Norfolk County Registry of Deeds, which map accompanies and is hereby declared to 
be part of this by-law. PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/26/2004) 

Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of designing, constructing, 
furnishing and equipping an Adult Community Center; to authorize the 
Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow in 
accordance with the provisions of Clause (3), Paragraph 7, Chapter 44 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws; and to authorize the Council on Aging with the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen to apply for grants from the federal and/or state 
governments and/or private parties and to enter into contracts to accomplish said 
purposes; provided that all appropriations authorized under this article be contingent 
upon approval of a so-called Proposition 2 Vz debt exclusion, in accordance with 
Chapter 59, Section 21C of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Council on Aging and Adult Community Center Study 
Committee) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate $2,000,000. Said sum to be raised by 
borrowing, for the purpose of designing, constructing, furnishing and equipping an 
Adult Community Center; and that the Treasurer/Collector with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow in accordance with the provisions of 
Clause (3), Paragraph 7, Chapter 44 of the Massachusetts General Laws; and that the 
Council on Aging and/or the Adult Community Center Study Committee, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen be authorized to apply for grants from the federal 
and /or state governments and/or private parties and to enter into contracts, to 
accomplish said purposes; provided that all appropriations authorized under this article 
are contingent upon approval of a so-called Proposition 2 Vi debt exclusion, in 
accordance with Chapter 59, Section 21 C of the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts. PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/26/2004) 

Article 22. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant an 
easement or other right of access to the present owners of the parcel of land shown as 
lot 2 on map 56 of the Town of Medfield Assessor's Maps, across Town-owned land 

178 



to permit construction of a driveway to provide access to and from West Mill Street to 
service one single-family residence to be constructed on the lot, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Town Administrator) 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant an easement or 
other right of access to the present owners of the parcel of land shown as lot 2 on map 
56 of the Town of Medfield Assessor's Maps, across Town-owned land to permit 
construction of a driveway to provide access to and from West Mill Street to service 
one single-family residence to be constructed on the lot. (4/27/2004) 

Article 23. To se if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of constructing a road on 
Town land identified on the Board of Assessors Maps as lots 43, 44, 45, map 56 and 
lot 10, map 63 and on a Town-owned right-of-way, commonly known as Marvin 
Drive, located off West Mill Street, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Economic Development Committee and Board of 
Selectmen) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate $125,000; said sum to be raised on the tax levy 
for the purpose of constructing a road on Town land identified on the Board of 
Assessors Maps as lots 43, 44, 45, map 56 and lot 10, map 63 and on a Town-owned 
right-of-way, commonly known as Marvin Drive, located off West Mill Street. 
(4/26/2004) 

Article 24. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of establishing a bond escrow 
account to provide for the payment of the outstanding bonds issued by the Town for 
the purchase of a portion of the land off West Mill Street, commonly known as 'the 30 
acres", and identified on the Board of Assessors Maps as lots 43, 44, 45, map 56 and 
lot 10, map 63; which portion of land is being converted from non-taxable use to 
taxable use; said escrow account to be established in compliance with the 
requirements of the United States Internal Revenue Service, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Economic Development Committee and Board of 
Selectmen) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate $155,000; said sum to be transferred from the 
Stabilization Fund, for the purpose of establishing a bond escrow account to provide 
for the payment of the outstanding bonds issued by the Town for the purchase of a 



179 



portion of the land off West Mill Street, commonly known as "the 30 acres", and 
identified on the Board of Assessors Maps as lots 43, 44, 45, map 56 and lot 10, map 
63, which portion of land is being converted from non-taxable use to taxable use, said 
escrow account to be established in compliance with the requirements of the United 
States Internal Revenue Service. (4/26/2004) 

Article 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Medfield By-laws by 
adding a new Section 32. Signs in Public Ways to ARTICLE IV POLICE 
REGULATIONS, to read as follows: 

No person shall attach or otherwise post any sign within any public right of 
way or upon any building, pole, post, or other structure or any tree located therein, 
provided that the Board of Selectmen, upon prior application, may permit a local 
municipal body or non-profit organization to place a public notice at designated 
location(s) within the public way provided further that such notice shall be mounted 
upon a moveable signboard and shall contain only a description of the event or 
activity, the date, time, and place, and the name of the sponsoring body or 
organization. Fine - $25 (Medfield Police Department). 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

MOTION TO AMEND: To add the word "commercial" after the word "any" in the 
first sentence. AMENDMENT CARRIES (4/26/2004) 

VOTED: That the Town amend the Town of Medfield By-laws by adding a new 
Section 32. Signs in Public Ways to ARTICLE IV POLICE REGULATIONS, to read 
as follows: 

No person shall attach or otherwise post any commercial sign within any 
public right of way or upon any building, pole, post, or other structure or any tree 
located therein, provided that the Board of Selectmen, upon prior application, may 
permit a local municipal body or non-profit organization to place a public notice at 
designated location(s) within the public way provided further that such notice shall be 
mounted upon a moveable signboard and shall contain only a description of the event 
or activity, the date, time, and place, and the name of the sponsoring body or 
organization. Fine - $25 (Medfield Police Department). MOTION PASSES AS- 
AMENDED (4/26/2004) 



Article 26. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 13 of the Zoning Bylaw by 
adding: 

Section 13.3.12 Back lighted (internally illuminated) informational signs or structures 
with translucent faces are not allowed. Signs may be illuminated by external light 
fixture (white in color) or halo-lighted (no "day-glo" colors). Lamps or tubes shall not 

180 



be visible to the motoring public from a public way. Sign graphics may not be 
translucent. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTED: That the Town amend Section 13 of the Zoning Bylaw by adding: 

Section 13.3.12 Back lighted (internally illuminated) informational signs or structures 
with translucent faces are not allowed. Signs may be illuminated by external light 
fixture (white in color) or halo-lighted (no "day-glo" colors). Lamps or tubes shall not 
be visible to the motoring public from a public way. Sign graphics may not be 
translucent. PASSES BY 2/3 VOTE (4/27/2004) 



Article 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 13 of the Zoning Bylaw by 
adding: 

Section 13.3.13 One "OPEN" flag shall be permitted per retail business. Flag shall 
not exceed 3 feet by 5 feet. Flag is to fly from a pole mounted to the building. Flag 
must be removed when business is not open. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTED: That the Town amend Section 13 of the Zoning Bylaw by adding: 

Section 13.3.13 One "OPEN" flag shall be permitted per retail business. Flag shall 
not exceed 3 feet by 5 feet. Flag is to fly from a pole mounted to the building. Flag 
must be removed when business is not open. PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE 

(4/27/2004) 



Article 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Medfield Zoning By- 
law, Section 14.13 SITE PLAN APPROVAL BY PLANNING BOARD, by striking 
the first sentence of subsection 14.13.1 and replacing it with: "No Building, except a 
single-family residence, shall be constructed or expanded in ground area except in 
conformance with this Section 14.13." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTED: That the Town amend the Town of Medfield Zoning By-law, Section 14.13 
SITE PLAN APPROVAL BY PLANNING BOARD, by striking the first sentence of 
subsection 14.13.1 and replacing it with: "No Building, except a single-family 



181 



residence, shall be constructed or expanded in ground area except in conformance with 
this Section 14.13." PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/27/2004) 

Article 29. To see if the Town will vote in accord with the provisions of M.G.L 
Chapter 40, Section 15C to designate the following roadways in the Town of Medfleld 
as "Scenic Roads": 

Hartford Street in its entirety 

North Street from Harding Street to the Dover town line 

Philip Street in its entirety 

School Street in its entirety 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTED: That the Town, in accord with the provisions of M.G.L Chapter 40, Section 
15C to designate the following roadways in the Town of Medfleld as "Scenic Roads": 

Hartford Street in its entirety 

North Street from Harding Street to the Dover town line 

Philip Street in its entirety 

School Street in its entirety 

MOTION CARRIES (4/27/2004) 

Article 30 To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of planning, designing, 
constructing, and operating a Town-owned Community Center / Field House and 
Driving Range on Town-owned land, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Park and Recreation 
Commission) 

VOTED: That the Town support the Park and Recreation Commission in the 
development of a proposal for a self-sufficient Town-owned Community Center/Field 
House and Driving Range, with the understanding that the Commission will conduct 
public meetings to present information and to solicit input from residents on such a 
proposal, and that the Commission report it's findings to the next Town Meeting 
and/or seek funding to continue with the design and/or construction of such a facility. 
PASSED BY MAJORITY VOTE (4/27/2004) 

Article 31. To see if the Town will vote to establish a Stabilization Fund for the 
purpose of depositing the Sewer Betterments Paid in Advance in accordance with the 



182 



Provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 5B and Chapter 59, 
Section 21C, paragraph (g), as amended by Chapter 137 of the Acts of 2003, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water & Sewerage Commission) 

VOTED: That the Town establish a Stabilization Fund for the purpose of depositing 
the Sewer Betterments Paid in Advance in accordance with the Provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 5B and Chapter 59, Section 21C, 
paragraph (g), as amended by Chapter 137 of the Acts of 2003, and appropriate 
$1,541,748 to this fund, said sum to be transferred from the sewer betterments 
collected in advance account and said funds to be used for the payment of debt and 
interest costs on sewer extension projects. PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/26/2004) 

Article 32. To see if the Town will vote to establish a Stabilization fund for the 
purpose of setting aside funds for the construction and furnishing of an Adult/Senior 
Community Center in accordance with the Provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 5B and Chapter 59, Section 21C, paragraph (g), as amended by 
Chapter 137 of the Acts of 2003, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Warrant Committee) 

VOTED: TO DISMISS THIS ARTICLE (4/26/2004) 

Article 33. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $204,985.49 from the 
Sewer Enterprise Fund Unreserved Fund Balance to cover the FY03 sewer revenue 
deficit, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Accountant) 

VOTED: That the Town transfer the sum of $204,985.49 from the Sewer Enterprise 
Fund Unreserved Fund Balance to cover the FY03 sewer revenue deficit. MOTION 
CARRIES (4/26/2004) 

Article. 34 To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for 
the purpose of designing and constructing collector sewer and laterals and associated 
equipment, as needed, in Hatters Hill Road from station + to station 15 = 20, 
Cheney Pond Road from station + to station 10 + 85.15, Vine Brook Road from 
station + to station 8 + 05.85 and Willow Circle from station + to station 3 + 
84.07; and that the required sum shall be raised and needed actions taken in this matter 



183 



consistent with the procedures of the Water and Sewer Commissioners; and to 
authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to 
borrow in accordance with the provisions of paragraphs (1) and (3), Section 7, 
Chapter 44 and or Chapter 29C of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, 
eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles or interests in land as may be 
necessary to carry out the purpose of this article; to authorize the Water and Sewer 
Commissioners and/or the Board of Selectmen to enter into contracts with consultants, 
designers and contractors; to accept grants and/or loans from the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and/or the United States Government to accomplish said purpose; and 
to see if the Town will vote to contribute up to 5% of the cost of the project; and to 
authorize the Water and Sewer Board to assess betterments in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 80 and 83 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and the Sewer Assessment Regulations of the Town of Medfleld, as 
may from time to time be amended; provided that all appropriations authorized under 
this article be contingent upon approval of a so-called Proposition 2 54 debt exclusion, 
in accordance with Chapter 59, Section 21C of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Citizen Petition) 

MOTION TO AMEND: To delete Willow Circle from station 0+0 to station 
3+84.07. AMENDMENT FAILS (4/26/2004) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate $410,000; said sum to be raised by borrowing; 
for the purpose of designing and constructing collector sewer and laterals and 
associated equipment, as needed, in Hatters Hill Road from station + to station 15 
+ 20, Cheney Pond Road from station + to station 10 + 85.15, Vine Brook Road 
from station + to station 8 + 05.85 and Willow Circle from station + to station 
3 + 84.07; and that the required sum shall be raised and needed actions taken in this 
matter consistent with the procedures of the Water and Sewer Commissioners; the 
Treasurer/Collector is authorized with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to 
borrow in accordance with the provisions of paragraphs (1) and (3), Section 7, 
Chapter 44 and or Chapter 29C of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts; and the Board of Selectmen is authorized to acquire by purchase, 
eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles or interests in land as may be 
necessary to carry out the purpose of this article; the Water and Sewer Commissioners 
and/or the Board of Selectmen are authorized to enter into contracts with consultants, 
designers and contractors; to accept grants and/or loans from the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and/or the United States Government to accomplish said purpose; and 
the Town will vote to contribute up to 5% of the cost of the project; authorize the 
Water and Sewer Board to assess betterments in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 80 and 83 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and 
the Sewer Assessment Regulations of the Town of Medfield, as may from time to time 

184 



be amended; provided that all appropriations authorized under this article are 
contingent upon approval of a so-called Proposition 2 Vi debt exclusion, in accordance 
with Chapter 59, Section 21C of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. MOTION CARRIES BY 2/3 VOTE (4/26/2004) 

Article 35. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of acquiring development 
rights for a parcel of land shown on the Town of Medfield Board of Assessor's Maps 
as map 64, lots 22 and 22A; to authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, to borrow in accordance of the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7, Paragraph (3); to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to accept grants and/or loans from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
and/or the United States Government to accomplish said purpose; provided that all 
appropriations authorized under this article be contingent upon approval of a so-called 
Proposition 2 !4 debt exclusion, in accordance with Chapter 59, Section 21 C of the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

MOTION TO AMEND: To add the words "but not required" after "authorized" in 
the first sentence and add "at such price and on such terms as they deem to be in the 
Town's best interest" after lots 22 and 22 A. AMENDMENT PASSES 

(4/26/2004) 

VOTED: That the Board of Selectmen be authorized, but not required to acquire by 
purchase, eminent domain or otherwise, and that the Town appropriate $750,000 to 
fund this acquisition; said sum to be raised by transferring $150,000 from the 
Conservation Land Purchase Fund, and by borrowing $600,000; for the purpose of 
acquiring development rights for a parcel of land shown on the Town of Medfield 
Board of Assessor's Maps as map 64 lots 22 and 22 A; at such price and on such terms 
as they deem to be in the Town's best interest, and that the Treasurer/Collector, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow in accordance of the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7, Paragraph (3); and 
the board of Selectmen is authorized to accept grants and/or loans from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts and/or the United States Government to accomplish 
said purpose; provided that all appropriations authorized under this article be 
contingent upon approval of a so-called Proposition 2 1/2 debt exclusion, in 
accordance with Chapter 59, Section 21 C of the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts. PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/26/2004) 

Article 36. To see if the Town will vote to support the Reuse Plan proposed by the 
Medfield State Hospital Reuse Committee and approved by the majority vote of that 
Committee. 



85 



(Citizen Petition) 

VOTED: TO DISMISS THIS ARTICLE (4/27/2004) 

Article 37. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Assessors to use a sum of 
money from free cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for fiscal 2005, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Assessors to use $800,000 from free 
cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for fiscal 2005. (4/27/2004) 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time 
of holding said Town Meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the Town Meeting aforesaid. Given unto our 
hands this 9 th day of March Two-Thousand and Four. 

Ann B. Thompson, Chairman S\ 
Paul Rhuda S\ 
Osier Peterson S\ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and at town meetings, to meet at the times and 
for the purposes named, by posting attested copies of the same at five public places 
seven days before the date of the election as within directed. 

Constable: Kevin McClay S\ 
Date: March 10, 2004 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Carol A. Mayer S\ CMC/CMMC 
Town Clerk 

Springfield Massachusetts 



186 



The foregoing amendments to the General and Zoning By-Laws adopted under 
Articles 13, 25, 26, 27, 27, and 20 of the warrant for the Annual Town Meeting that 
dissolved on April 26, 2004 have been approved by the Attorney General's Office. 

THOMAS F. REILLY 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 

By Kelli E. Gunagan S\ 
Assistant Attorney General 
August 20, 2004 



187 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 

JUNE 7, 2004 



Norfolk,ss. 

To the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, Greetings: 

In the Name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in Town elections by ballot at 
the Ralph Wheelock School gymnasium, located on Elm Street in said Medfield, on 
MONDAY the 7th day of JUNE, A.D., 2004, at 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the 
following questions: 

PROPOSITION 2 1/2 DEBT EXCLUSION QUESTION 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the provision of proposition 
two and one-half, so called, the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to 
pay for the design, construction, furnishing and equipping of a Adult Community 
Center? 

YES NO 



PROPOSITION 2 Vi DEBT EXCLUSION QUESTION 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition 
two and one half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bonds to be issued for 
the purpose of designing and constructing collector sewer and laterals and associated 
equipment as need in the following streets? 

Hatters Hill Rd, Cheney Pond Rd, Vine Brook Rd and Willow Circle 

YES NO 

PROPOSITION 2 Vi DEBT EXCLUSION QUESTION 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition 
two and one-half, so called, the amounts required to pay for the bonds issued in order 
to pay for the purchase of development rights in property located at 112 Harding 



188 



Street, known as Mapleleaf Farm and identified on the Official town Assessor's maps 
as Lots 22 and 22A, on Map 64? 

YES NO 



PROPOSITION 2 y 2 OPERATIONAL OVERRIDE QUESTION 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to assess an additional $538,000 in real estate 
and personal property taxes for the general operating expenses of the various Town 
an4 School Departments for the fiscal year beginning July first, two thousand and 
four? 

YES NO 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time 
of holding said Election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the Town Meeting aforesaid. Given unto our 
hands this 4th day of May, Two-Thousand and Four. 

Paul Rhuda S\ 
Osier Peterson S\ 
Ann Thompson S\ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purposes 
named, by posting attested copies of the same at five public places seven days before 
the date of the elections as within directed. 

Constable: Steven Grover 
Date: May 5, 2004 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC 
TOWN CLERK 



189 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 

JUNE 7, 2004 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 
ASSISTANT WARDEN: Al Allegretto 

TELLERS: Al Allegretto., John McGowan, Joan Bussow, Ruth Chick, Phyllis 
Wilmarth, Emmy Mitchell, Missy Cavanaugh, Patricia Rioux, Gerry Finn, Rita 
Allegretto, Jane Timmerman, Tony Centore, Sandy Williams, Herbert Williams, Mike 
Costa, and Eugene Swezey 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 2155. There are 7,894 registered voters, 27% of voters voting. 



QUESTION 1 - PROP 2 V 2 DEBT EXCLUSION 

ADULT COMMUNITY CENTER 
Yes 

No 
Blanks 

QUESTION 2 - PROP 2 V 2 DEBT EXCLUSION 

SEWERS ON STREETS 
Yes 

No 
Blanks 

QUESTION 3 - PROP 2 V 2 DEBT EXCLUSION 

DEVELOPMENT RIGHTS 
Yes 

No 
Blanks 



QUESTION 4 
OVERRIDE - 
Yes 

No 



PROP 2 54 OPERATIONAL 
TOWN AND SCHOOL 





PRECINCT 




1 


2 

389 


3 

424 


4 

370 


TOTAL 


402 


1585 


137 


150 


143 


124 


554 


5 


9 





2 


16 
2155 


326 


349 


371 


313 


1359 


209 


185 


179 


170 


743 


9 


14 


17 


13 


53 
2155 


387 


361 


394 


337 


1479 


152 


164 


159 


147 


622 


5 


23 


14 


12 


54 
2155 


332 


362 


388 


297 


1379 


208 


179 


175 


196 


758 



190 



Blanks 4 7 4 3 18 

2155 
After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets 
were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 

June 8, 2004 



191 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

STATE PRIMARY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2004 



SS. Norfolk 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield: 



GREETING: 



In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in elections to vote at Precinct 1, 2, 
3, 4, at Wheelock School gymnasium, located on Elm Street in said Medfield, on 
TUESDAY, THE FOURTEENTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2004, from 6:00 A.M. to 
8:00 P.M. for the following offices: 



REPRESENTATIVE IN 
CONGRESS 



Ninth CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



COUNCILLOR 



Second DISTRICT 



SENATOR IN THE GENERAL 
COURT 



NORFOLK & BRISTOL 
DISTRICT 



REPRESENTATIVE IN THE 
GENERAL COURT 



Ninth & Thirteenth NORFOLK 
DISTRICT 



SHERIFF 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 



NORFOLK COUNTY 
NORFOLK COUNTY 



REGISTER OF DEEDS 



NOROLK DISTRICT 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time 
and place of said voting. Given under our hands this 10 th day of August, 2004. 



Paul Rhuda, Chair S\ 
Osier Peterson S\ 
Ann Thompson S\ 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



192 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of the same at five public places fourteen days before the 
date of the meeting as within directed. 

Constable: Ray Burton S\ 
Date: August 11,2004 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer, CMC, CMMC S\ 
Town Clerk 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

STATE PRIMARY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2004 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 
ASST. WARDEN: Angelo Allegretto 

TELLERS: John McGowan, Joan Bussow, Ruth Chick, Phyllis Wilmarth, Emmy 
Mitchell, Missy Cavanaugh, Kathy Lee, Rita Allegretto, Barbara Reynolds, Jane 
Timmerman, Tony Centore, Sandy Williams, Herbert Williams, Mike Costa and 
Eugene Swezey 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 431 - Democrat - 267, Republican - 163, Libertarian - 1. There 
are 8,057 registered voters, 3.5% of voters voting. 

PRECINCT 
DEMOCRAT 12 3 4 TOTAL 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS vote for 
ONE 



193 



Stephen F. Lynch 43 51 74 54 

Write In 1 1 

Blanks 15 7 12 9 

COUNCILLOR vote for ONE 

Kelly A. Timilty 46 49 70 50 

Write In 1 

Blanks 13 9 15 14 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT vote for ONE 

James E. Timilty 47 50 67 49 

Write In 1 

Blanks 12 7 19 15 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT vote 

for ONE 

Lida E. Harkins 49 46 

John J. McFeeley 

Stanley J. Nacewicz 

George R Smith, Jr. 

Write In 

Blanks 

REGISTER OF DEEDS vote for ONE 
William P. O'Donnell 
Anthony T. McDonnell 
Blanks 

SHERIFF vote for ONE 
Michael G. Bellotti 
Blanks 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER vote for not more 

than TWO 

John M. Gillis 

Francis W. O'Brien 

Stephen G. Harold 

Susan M. Rogers 

Blanks 

REPUBLICAN 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS vote for 







61 


41 






4 


7 






9 


10 


1 


1 






9 


11 


12 


6 


46 


47 


75 


49 


6 


7 


4 


10 


7 


4 


7 


5 


43 


48 


67 


43 


16 


10 


19 


21 



18 


21 


28 


21 


39 


36 


54 


32 


8 


5 


12 


8 


23 


30 


29 


25 


30 


24 


49 


42 



194 



ONE 



Write In 


2 




1 


2 


5 


Blanks 


35 


25 


47 


51 


158 
163 


COUNCILLOR vote for ONE 












Michael W. McCue 


1 


1 




5 


7 


Write In 


1 






1 


2 


Blanks 


35 


24 


48 


47 


154 
163 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT vote for ONE 












Philip A. Brown 


22 


12 


25 


35 


94 


David W. McCarter 


13 


13 


20 


15 


61 


Blanks 


2 




3 


3 


8 
163 


REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT vote 












for ONE 












Richard J. Ross 






45 


48 


93 


Write In 


2 






1 


3 


Blanks 


35 


25 


3 


4 


67 
163 


REGISTER OF DEEDS vote for ONE 












Write In 


2 






1 


3 


Blanks 


35 


25 


48 


52 


160 
163 


SHERIFF vote for ONE 












Write In 


1 






2 


3 


Blanks 


36 


25 


48 


51 


160 
163 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER vote for not more 












than TWO 












Write In 


1 




1 




2 


Blanks 


73 


50 


95 


106 


324 
326 


LIBERTARIAN 












REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS vote for 












ONE 












Write in 




1 






1 



COUNCILLOR vote for ONE 
Write In 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT vote for ONE 
Write In 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT vote 



195 



for ONE 

Write In 1 

REGISTER OF DEEDS vote for ONE 

Write In 1 ) 



SHERIFF vote for ONE 

Write In 1 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER vote for not more 

than TWO 

Write In 2 

NO GREEN-RAINBOW BALLOTS 

After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets 
were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 



September 16, 2004 



196 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN, SECRETARY 

STATE ELECTION 

NOVEMBER 2, 2004 

SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Elections to vote at Precinct 1, 2, 
3, 4 at the Ralph Wheelock School on TUESDAY, THE SECOND DAY OF 
NOVEMBER, 2004 from 6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following purposes: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates for the following offices: 

ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND STATE WIDE 

VICE PRESIDENT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN 9 th DISTRICT 

CONGRESS 



COUNCILLOR 



Second DISTRICT 



SENATOR IN THE GENERAL 
COURT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN THE 
GENERAL COURT 

SHERIFF 



NORFOLK & BRISTOL 



9 th & 13 th NORFOLK 
DISTRICT 

NORFOLK COUNTY 



COUNTY COMMISSIONERS NORFOLK COUNTY 

REGISTER OF DEEDS NORFOLK DISTRICT 

QUESTION 1 (Precincts 1 & 2 only) 
THIS QUESTION IS NOT BINDING 

Shall the state representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of a 
constitutional amendment that would remove the authority to create congressional and 
legislative districts from the state Legislature and instead place that responsibility in 
the hands of an independent commission, subject to strict guidelines for public 



197 



participation, non-partisanship, retaining the integrity of existing communities, and 
respecting the voting rights of minorities? 



YES NO 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfleld, seven days at least before the time 
of holding said election. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time 
and place of said voting. Given under our hands this 19th day of October, 2004 



Paul Rhuda S/ 
Osier Peterson S/ 
Ann Thompson S/ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfleld, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of the same at five public places seven days before the date 
of the meeting as within directed. 

Constable: Al Manganello 
Date: October 20, 2004 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer, S/ CMMC, CMC 
TOWN CLERK 



198 






COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN, SECRETARY 

STATE ELECTION 

NOVEMBER 2, 2004 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 
ASSISTANT WARDEN: Al Allegreto 

TELLERS: Michael Costa, John McGowan, Joan Bussow, Ruth Chick, John Hand, 
Phyllis Wilmarth, Emmy Mitchell, Missy Cavanaugh, Patricia Rioux, Gerry Finn, 
Kathy Lee, Rita Allegretto, Barbara Reynolds, Jane Timmerman, Tony Centore, 
Sandy Williams, Herbert Williams, Susan Haake, Eugene Swezey, Donna Dragotakes 
and Susan Bauer 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 6964. There are 8,287 registered voters, 84% of voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 

PRECINCT 



ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE 


1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


PRESIDENT (vote for ONE) 












Badnarik and Campagna 


9 


11 


11 


12 


43 


Bush and Cheney 


748 


794 


862 


810 


3214 


Cobb and LaMarche 


6 


3 


5 


8 


22 


Kerry and Edwards 


935 


928 


937 


818 


3618 


Nader and Camejo 


5 




3 


4 


12 


Write In 


3 




2 


6 


11 


Blanks 


9 


14 


11 


10 


44 
6964 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 












(vote for ONE) 












Stephen F Lynch 


1221 


1253 


1256 


1142 


4872 


Write In 


6 




19 


8 


33 


Blanks 


488 


497 


556 


518 


2059 



6964 



COUNCILLOR (vote for ONE) 






199 



Kelly A Timilty 


1163 


1171 


1153 


1080 


Write In 


1 




17 


4 


Blanks 


551 


579 


661 


584 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 










(vote for ONE) 










David W McCarter 


649 


673 


759 


743 


James E Timilty 


910 


921 


902 


802 


Write In 






1 




Blanks 


156 


156 


169 


123 


REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 










(vote for ONE) 










John J McFeeley 






808 


748 


Richard J Ross 






816 


769 


Lida E Harkins 


1245 


1231 






Write In 


1 




2 


3 


Blanks 


469 


519 


205 


148 



REGISTER OF DEEDS (vote for One) 
William P. O'Donnell 
Write In 

Blanks 



1178 1197 1197 1120 

2 6 2 

535 553 628 546 



SHERIFF (vote for ONE) 
Michael G Bellotti 
Write In 
Blanks 



1173 1186 1193 1097 

4 4 4 

538 564 634 567 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER (vote for not 

More than TWO) 
John M Gillis 
Francis W. O'Brien 
Write In 
Blanks 



669 661 729 661 

807 851 848 748 

3 3 4 

1951 1988 2082 1923 



200 



QUESTION 1 - Redistricting 

Yes 888 881 1769 

No 468 484 952 

Blanks 359 385 744 

3465 

After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets 
were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer, CMC, CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 

November 17, 2004 



201 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2004 



202 






BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

COMPARATIVE FINANCIAL REPORTS 

2003, 2004 AND 2005 



2003 1 Residential 

2 Open Space 

3 Commercial 

4 Industrial 

5 Personal Property 


3923 

112 

133 

49 

182 


$1,394,860,000.00 

$3,832,050.00 

$41,033,250.00 

$32,312,750.00 

$15,691,487.00 


Total Real and Personal Property 


4399 


$1,487,729,537.00 


Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 




$23,744,163.41 

$103,869.41 

$15.96 


2004 1 Residential 

2 Open Space 

3 Commercial 

4 Industrial 

5 Personal Property 


3930 

112 

134 

49 

214 


$1,903,413,160.00 

$4,674,100.00 

$49,668,050.00 

$35,915,550.00 

$19,850,319.00 


Total Real and Personal Property 


4439 * 


$2,013,521,179.00 


Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 




$25,551,583.63 

$141,540.24 

$12.69 



203 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Taxes receivable as of June 30, 2004 



Fiscal Year 
2004 
2003 
2002 


Real Estate 

$123,617.82 

20,147.77 

15,510.39 


Personal Property 
$2,190.17 
1,813.84 
3,390.82 


Excise Tax 

$40,411.04 

27,389.39 

8,850.95 


2001 


$2,164.04 


1,065.74 





2000 


4,274.42 


614.31 





1999 


4,418.22 


1,831.14 





1998 











1997 and Prior 











TOTAL 


170,132.66 


10,906.02 


76,651.38 


Tax Title 




$15,132.18 





Respectfully submitted, 

Georgia K. Colivas 
Tax Collector 



204 



TOWN TREASURER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



Statement of Cash 

Receipts Fiscal Year 2004 
Including investment returns 

Disbursements Fiscal Year 2004 
Including reinvestments 

Cash Balance on June 30, 2004 



$66,593,853.69 



$66,366,076.85 



$26,099,136.29 



Statement of Investments 

Pooled Investment Fund 
Investments with MMDT June 30, 
2004 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments June 30, 2004 



$1,097,039.65 
$27,196,175.94 



Statement of Interest Received on Savings/Investments 

General Fund $395,022.86 

Pooled Investment Fund $ 11,059.82 



Total Interest Received in Fiscal 2004 



$603,530.21 



Outstanding Debt Accounts June 30,2004 

Debt Exclusion: 

Town Land Acquisition 

Sewers 

School Construction 

Library Renovation 

School Roofs 

Additional School Roofs 

HS/Middle School/Memorial Construction 



460,510 

11,634,631 

4,739,490 

1,320,000 

510,000 

450,000 

34,350,000 



BAN on HS/Middle School/Memorial 



19,000,000 



205 



Non-Exclusion: 

Fire Truck $80,000 

Town Hall Renovation 1 ,495 ,000 

Cap Landfill 555,000 

Athletic Facilities 1 1 0,000 

School Adm. Remodel 45,000 

Land Acquisitions 2,490,000 

Health Septic Loans (MWPAT) 66,246 

Ambulance 30,000 

Enterprise Fund: 

Well No. 6 970,000 

Water Treatment Plant 300,000 

Causeway Water Main 720,000 

WWTP Improvements 2,070,000 

Forest St. Water Main 200,000 



Total Long Term Debt 62,595,877 



206 



TOWN TREASURER 




TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 


Funds in Custody of the Town Treasurer: 




Retirement/Pension 


$2,883,372.48 


Conservation 


199,532.69 


Stabilization 


817,580.45 


Special Unemployment Insurance 


236,817.06 


Group Insurance 


100,348.54 


Library Trusts 


17,393.99 


Granville Dailey-Library 


82,139.44 


Madelyn L. Grant Library Fund 


49,147.73 


Cemetery Perpetual Care 


623,291.31 


Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 


9,219.19 


Municipal Insurance 


201,312.57 


Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 


123,596.55 


Council on Aging 


1,933.35 


Palumbo Sports Fund 


52.37 


Pilgrim Health Care Fund 





Moses Ellis Post #117 GA.R. 


9,369.73 


Medfield Antiquities Trust 


5,119.35 


Tri-Centennial Trust 


2,622.73 


School Essay Fund 


3,408.86 


Allendale Sewer Pumping Station Fund 


56,043.28 


Dela Park Acres Trust 


14,003.46 


Cedarview Acres 


14,064.02 


Carruth Sewer District 


14,114.53 


Maude Washburn Trust Fund 


3,364.36 


Playground Trust 


3,454.01 


Elderly & Disabled Trust 


3,389.05 


375 th Anniversary Trust 


1,018.50 


Balance June 30, 2004 


$5,770,150.29 



Respectfully submitted, Georgia K. Colivas, Treasurer/Collector 

207 



TOWN ACCbUNTANT 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

BALANCE SHEET 
FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2004 



FUND: 01 GENERAL FUND 



ACCOUNT 
BALANCE 



ASSETS 




01 


101000 


01 


121000 


01 


121001 


01 


121002 


01 


121003 


01 


121004 


01 


121099 


01 


122000 


01 


122001 


01 


122002 


01 


122003 


01 


122004 


01 


122099 


01 


123001 


01 


123002 


01 


123003 


01 


123004 


01 


124000 


01 


125300 


01 


126102 


01 


126103 


01 


126104 


01 


129104 


01 


134002 


01 


136000 


01 


143101 


01 


143102 


01 


143103 


01 


143104 


01 


143900 


01 


161010 


01 


161015 


01 


161033 



Cash 

2000 Personal Prop Tax Rec 

2001 Personal Prop Tax Rec 

2002 Personal Prop Tax Rec 

2003 Personal Prop Tax Rec 

2004 Personal Prop Tax Rec 

1999 Personal Prop Tax Rec 

2000 Real Estate Tax Rec 

2001 Real Estate Tax Rec 

2002 Real Estate Tax Rec 

2003 Real Estate Tax Rec 

2004 Real Estate Tax Rec-CH59 
1999 Real Estate Tax Rec 
Prov For Abate/ Exempt - 2001 
Prov For Abate/ Exempt - 2002 
Prov For Abate/Exempt - 2003 
Prov For Abate/ Exempt - 2004 
Tax Title/ Liens Receivable 
Deferred Taxes Receivable 

2002 Mve Recbl-CH60A 

2003 Mve Recbl-CH60A 

2004 Mve Recbl-CH60A 

2004 Agriculture Tax Rec-CH61A 
Amb Chgs Billg Agency Rec 
Police Special Detail Recble 

2001 App Sewer Bett Add to Tax 

2002 App Sewer Bett Add to Tax 

2003 App Sewer Bett Add to Tax 

2004 App Sewer Bett Add to Tax 
Committed Interest Sewer Ad/Tx 
Cherry Sheet-Non Recurring Rec 
Due From Trust Fund-80 

Due From CH90 Fund-33 



27,205 

1 

3 

1 

2 

1 

4 

2 

15 

20 

123 

4 

-32 

-7 

-34 

-27 

15 

82 

8 

27 

40 

90 

11 



1 

1 

8 

28 

188 



,857.52 
614.31 
,065.74 
,390.82 
,813.84 
,190.17 
,831.14 
,274.42 
,164.04 
,510.39 
,147.77 
,617.82 
,418.22 
,374.25 
,119.76 
,611.45 
,916.59 
,132.18 
,285.91 
,850.95 
,389.39 
,411.04 
-147.04 
,425.73 
,214.80 
116.95 
116.95 
116.95 
,546.70 
,610.94 
,050.00 
,623.35 
,928.94 



TOTAL ASSETS 27,789,547.89 



208 



TOWN OF l^EDFIELD 

BALANCE SHEET 
FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2004 



FUND: 01 GENERAL FUND 



ACCOUNT 
BALANCE 






01 


120000 


01 


124001 


01 


125301 


01 


126000 


01 


134100 


01 


136100 


01 


143925 


01 


201000 


01 


202000 


01 


222000 


01 


222200 


01 


222500 


01 


223000 


01 


223100 


01 


226800 


01 


227009 


01 


227010 


01 


227011 


01 


238020 


01 


238021 


01 


238030 


01 


238031 


01 


238032 


01 


238040 


01 


238041 


01 


238060 


01 


238061 



FUND BALANCE 




01 


324001 


01 


324002 


01 


324006 


01 


326000 


01 


333000 


01 


359000 



Def Rev-Property Tax 
Def Rev-Tax Title /Liens 
Def Rev- Deferred Taxes 
Def Rev-MVE Tax 
Def Rev-Ambulance 
Def Rev-Police Special Detail 
Def Rev- Special Betterment 
Warrants Payable 
Accounts Payable 
Payroll Paybl-Retirement W/H 
Payroll Paybl-Voluntary Life 
Payroll Paybl- Annuity W/H 
Payroll Paybl-Health Insur W/H 
Payrolll Paybl-Basic Life Ins W/H 
Payroll Paybl-Dental Ins W/H 
Zoning Bd Refundbl Dep Paybl 
Ping Bd Refundbl Deposit Paybl 
Conservation Proj Deposit Paybl 
Due to Spec Revenue Fund-20 
Due to Spec Revenue Fund-2 1 
Due to Spec Revenue Fund-30 
Due to Spec Revenue Fund-3 1 
Due to Spec Revenue Fund-32 
Due to Capital Project Fund-40 
Due to Sewer Cap Proj Fd - 4 1 
Due to Water Enterprise - 60 
Due to Sewer Enterprise - 6 1 



-78,869.59 

-15,132.18 

-82,285.91 

-76,651.38 

-90,425.73 

-11,214.80 

-3,508.49 

-876,154.09 

-3,204.69 

-2,118.79 

-683.12 

-10,312.20 

-38,859.58 

185.76 

-6,728.05 

-10,009.57 

-12,450.02 

-2,978.17 

-120,442.36 

-406,579.19 

-159,467.86 

-1,811,689.69 

-210,638.80 

15,726,043.81 

-1,494,335.58 

-1,420,019.25 

-163,041.35 



TOTAL LIABILITIES -22,833,658.49 



F/B Res For Encumbrance 
F/B Res For Exp-Special Articles 
F/B Res For Capital Budget 
F/B Res For Snow Deficit 
F/B Res For Expend FR F C 
Fund Equity/ Retained Earnings 



-584,817.22 

-1,911,384.75 

-21,000.00 

20,437.47 

-800,000.00 

-1,659,124.90 



TOTAL FUND BALANCE -4,955,889.40 



TOTAL LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE -27,789,547.89 



FREE CASH CERTIFIED $ 1 ,550,455 



209 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 20 - School Grants 

Fiscal Year 2004 



Account Balance 

Number Account Title 6/30/04 

S 20-004 Community Partnership Gr - Fd 86 

F 20-005 Drug Free School Grant - Fd 76 

F 20-007 Tide VIB-Early Childhood -Fd 79 

F 20-008 Tide VIB-941 142 - Fd 77/78 

F 20-0 14 SPED Supprtg Access to Curr-Fd 74 

S 20-020 DOE-FY98 Foundation Dollars-Fd 87 

S 20-035 Subsidiary Agreement Grant - Fd 88 

F 20-036 Academic Support Services Gr-Fd 32 

F 20-044 F-Tide V Grant - Fd 72 

F 20-045 F-Teacher Quality Grant-Fd 37 

S 20-047 Circuit Breaker Progr - Fd 83 
Total 

Total Federal 

Total State 

Total School Grant's 



$ 


126.00 


$ 


3,622.00 


$ 


376.35 


$ 


31,418.56 


$ 


9,594.00 


$ 


1,197.60 


$ 


68,020.50 


$ 


6.27 


$ 


527.80 


$ 


5,224.28 


$ 


329.00 


$ 


120,442.36 


$ 


50,769.26 


$ 


69,673.10 


$ 


120,442.36 



210 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 21 - School Revolving 

Fiscal Year 2004 



Account 






Balance 


Number 


Account Title 
School Athletic Revolving 




6/30/04 


21-003 


$ 


19,484.88 


21-004 


Adult Education 


$ 


43,242.75 


21-006 


Tuition Revolving 


$ 


39,668.17 


21-007 


Fine Arts revolving 


$ 


4,910.31 


21-016 


School Intramurals 


$ 


22,387.53 


21-017 


Substitute Teachers 


$ 


160.00 


21-019 


Middle School Interscholastic 


$ 


9,419.61 


21-020 


Community Partnerhip 


$ 


1,204.01 


21-021 


MEDF Coalition for Public Ed. 


$ 


30,384.96 




Subtotal 


$ 


170,862.22 


21-001 


School Lunch 


$ 


230,055.37 


21-012 


Voluntary Local Education 


$ 


5,086.88 


21-023 


Sc Const-$55.6M-Contr. Rev. 


$ 


574.72 




Subtotal 


$ 


235,716.97 




Grand Total 


$ 


406,579.19 



211 





Town of Medfield 








Fund 30 - Town Grant* 








Fiscal Year 2004 






Account 








Number 


Account Title 

S-Police Drug Education 




06/30/04 


30-006 


$ 


764.70 


30-012 


S-Hazardous Waste Collection 


$ 


1,000.00 


30-013 


S-Dep Compost Bin 


$ 


1,963.70 


30-015 


S-Police Vests 


$ 


326.25 


30-016 


S-Library Building Grant 


$ 


693.18 


30-017 


S-Law Enforcement Block Grant 


$ 


108.26 


30-020 


S-TitleV Public Info. Gr. 


$ 


3,016.39 


30-024 


S-State Aid to Library 


$ 


36,127.86 


30-028 


S-Community Policing FY98 


$ 


154.62 


30-029 


S-DEP Recycling Grant 


$ 


15,238.04 


30-031 


S-Police DARE Grant FY99 


$ 


66.15 


30-032 


S-Community Policing Radio 


$ 


639.00 


30-034 


S-Water Pollutn Abate-Tit V 


$ 


61,008.59 


30-035 


S-Community Policing FY00 


$ 


2,972.20 


30-036 


S-DARE FY00 


$ 


14.73 


30-039 


S-D ARE Grant FY01 


$ 


44.73 


30-042 


S-Medfield Arts Council Int. Bearing 


$ 


6,382.61 


30-050 


S-Police RAD Grant FY02 


$ 


628.49 


30-051 


S-Dare Grant FY02 


$ 


248.32 


30-053 


S-Community Policing FY02 


$ 


265.77 


30-055 


S-Police RAD Grant FY03 


$ 


450.00 


30-056 


S-Community Policing FY03 


$ 


874.93 


30-058 


S-Fire Safety Equipment FY03 Grant 


$ 


114.00 


30-059 


P. Outreach MCHF Gr 


$ 


15,267.50 


30-060 


S-Pol Safety Equip FY03 Grant 


$ 


2,148.10 


30-062 


S-Senior Formula Grant FY04 


$ 


26.45 


30-063 


S-Community Policing FY04 


$ 


7,071.83 


30-066 


S-MDPH Emer Prep Grant (BOH) 


$ 


748.66 


30-068 


P-COA Comcast Grant 


$ 


1,102.80 




Total 


$ 


159,467.86 




Total Federal Grants (F) 


$ 






Total State Grants (S) 


$ 


143,097.56 




Total Private Grants (P) 


$ 


16,370.30 






$ 


159,467.86 



212 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 31 - Town Revolving 

Fiscal Year 2004 



Account 






Balance 


Number 


Account Title 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 




6/30/2004 


31-001 


$ 


70,120.00 


31-002 


Cemetery Perpetual Care 


$ 


41,740.00 


31-003 


Insurance Reimb <$20,000 


$ 


825.00 


31-004 


Park & Recreation Revolving 


$ 


7,107.08 


31-005 


Tennis Revolving 


$ 


7,403.22 


31-006 


Swim Pond revolving 


$ 


4,434.69 


31-007 


Fire Alarm Revolving 


$ 


29,372.10 


31-008 


Kennel Fee Revolving 


$ 


1,873.93 


31-010 


Prem Sale of Bonds - DE-1 Offset 


$ 


127,344.97 


31-011 


Pilgrim Self Insured Insurance 


$ 


646,937.17 


31-012 


Fire CPR Revolving 


$ 


1,066.53 


31-013 


Georgetown Roadwork 


$ 


3,000.00 


31-017 


Special Investigation Police 


$ 


1,373.50 


31-022 


Police Special Detail 


$ 


58,296.74 


31-024 


Conservation Fees 


$ 


2,138.75 


31-028 


Ambulance Mileage Fees Revolg 


$ 


19,145.21 


31-029 


Add! Chap 90 funds 


$ 


43,493.18 


31-033 


Town Hall Renv Bonding Company 


$ 


23,230.42 


31-036 


Fire Arms Revolving 


$ 


5,890.10 


31-040 


Pilgr. Enh 65 Self Insurance 


$ 


229,528.88 


31-042 


Amb Mileage Rev-Billing Agency 


$ 


56,202.46 


31-043 


Adv Life Support Fees-Billing Ag 


$ 


10,193.76 


31-046 


Ban Premium - DE-1 Offset 


$ 


420,972.00 




Total For Fund 31 


$ 


1,811,689.69 



213 





TownofMedfield 








Fund 32 - Gifts 








Fiscal Year 2004 






Account 






Balance 


Number 


Account Title 
Cable Access Gift 




6/30/2004 


32-001 


$ 


100.00 


32-002 


Fire Gift 


$ 


2,201.39 


32-003 


Dwight Derby House Gift 


$ 


1,000.00 


32-004 


Civil Defense gift 


$ 


3,942.62 


32-006 


Copeland Gift Police 


$ 


9,525.58 


32-007 


School/Police Safety Gift 


$ 


164.20 


32-008 


Council on Aging Gift 


$ 


14,986.69 


32-011 


Pondview Sidewalk gift 


$ 


193.87 


32-013 


Drug Wages Norwood Gift 


$ 


742.46 


32-014 


Historical Commission Gift 


$ 


34.00 


32-015 


Long Range Planning Gift 


$ 


447.00 


32-016 


Comm to Study Memorials Gift 


$ 


11,307.37 


32-018 


Memorial Day Gift 


$ 


3,383.46 


32-019 


Hazardous Waste Gift 


$ 


3,434.09 


32-020 


Outreach Gift 


$ 


2,409.52 


32-022 


Park & Recreation Gift 


$ 


1,698.68 


32-025 


Town Meeting Gift 


$ 


75.00 


32-027 


Ambulance Gift 


$ 


3,477.51 


32-028 


Library Gift 


$ 


36,619.63 


32-030 


Grist Mill Gift 


$ 


13,055.66 


32-031 


Town Common Gift 


$ 


2,531.06 


32-032 


Conservation Gift 


$ 


1,115.04 


32-034 


Library Building Gift 


$ 


31,714.01 


32-035 


Dare Police Donations 


$ 


3,870.76 


32-038 


COA TRIAD Gift 


$ 


294.91 


32-039 


Library Book/Materials Gift 


$ 


21,486.68 


32-040 


Mc Carthy Field Gift Fund 


$ 


242.42 


32-041 


Kennel Operations Gift 


$ 


2,946.01 


32-042 


COA-Senior Van Gift ac 


$ 


223.86 


32-043 


Arts/Cult Council Gift-Est 3/02 


$ 


679.00 


32-044 


Entering Medfield Sign Gift ac 


$ 


2,000.00 




Total 


$ 


175,902.48 




School 






32-005 


Computer Gift Program-School 


$ 


34,736.32 




Total School 


$ 


34,736.32 




Total For Fund 32 


$ 


210,638.80 



214 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 33 - Chapter 90 

Fiscal Year 2004 



Account Ending Balance 
Number Account Title 6/30/2004 

$ 

33-003 S St SW Curve-Elm $ 250k 12/00 $ (6,648.1 1) 

33-006 Causeway St. Bridge $180k 13/01 $ (182,280.83) OK 60 day rule 

33-007 Spring St-Rt 27- $135K J -_ 

Total For Fund 33 $ (188,928.94) 



add Jul '04 Ch90 cash receipts $ 182,280.83 OK 60 day rule 

adjusted Total for Fund 33 $ (6,648.11) 



215 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 80 - Trust Funds 

Fiscal Year 2004 



Account 




Balance 


Number 


Account Tide 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Trust 


6/30/2004 


80-001 


598,808.00 


80-002 


Unemployment Comp Trust 


236,817.06 


80-003 


Conservation Trust Fund 


199,532.69 


80-004 


Library Trust Fund 


17,393.99 


80-005 


Pension Trust Fund 


2,883,372.48 


80-006 


Stabilization Trust Fund 


817,580.45 


80-007 


Health Claim Group Ins Trust 


100,348.54 


80-008 


Municipal Building Ins Trust 


201,312.57 


80-009 


Palumbo Trust Fund-Expendable 


52.37 


80-010 


Gloria G. Lynn Trust-Expendable 


9,219.19 


80-011 


Council On Aging Trust-Expend 


1,933.35 


80-013 


Allendale Sewer Trust Expendbl 


56,043.28 


80-014 


Dela Park Acres Expendable 


14,003.46 


80-015 


Carruth Sewer Trust Expendable 


14,114.53 


80-016 


Cedarview Acres Trust Expendbl 


14,064.02 


80-017 


Cemetery Perp Care Interest 


24,483.31 


80-018 


Granville Daily Trust 


82,139.44 


80-019 


Essay Trust Fund 


3,408.86 


80-020 


Tri-Centennial Trust Fund 


2,622.73 


80-021 


Antiquities Trust-Non Expendbl 


5,119.35 


80-022 


Mad Grant Scholar Trust-Ex 


123,596.55 


80-023 


Moses Ellis Gar Trust-Non Exp 


9,369.73 


80-024 


M. Washburn Trust-Non Expend 


3,364.36 


80-025 


Playground Trust-Park & Rec 


3,454.01 


80-026 


Madelyn Grant Library Trust Fnd 


49,147.73 


80-027 


Elderly & Disabled Trust Fd 


3,389.05 


80-028 


365 Anniversary Trust 


1,018.50 




Total For Trust Fund 80 


$ 5,475,709.60 



Respectfully submitted, 

Joy A. Ricciuto, CGA 
Town Accountant 



216 



WATER ENTERPRISE FUND 

FISCAL YEAR 2004 

ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 

WATER ENTERPRISE REVENUES & AVAILABLE FUNDS: 

USER CHARGES $ 1,078,724 

TOTAL WATER REVENUES 

TOTAL COSTS APPROPRIATED IN THE WATER DEPARTMENT 

ORGANIZATION CODE 60-410-1 AND 60-410-2: 

PERSONNEL $ 233,748 

OPERATIONS $ 379,666 

RESERVE FUND PROJECTS: 
- NEW METERS $ 45,000 



1,078,724 



SUB-TOTAL WATER DEPARTMENT COSTS 

ALLOCATED EXPENSES APPROPRIATED IN OTHER 

DEPARTMENTAL BUDGETS: 
DEBT SERVICE: 

PRINCIPAL 01-710-2 $ 145,000 

INTEREST 01-751-2 $ 100,338 

TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 



658,414 



245,338 






174,972 



INSURANCE $ 23,396 

CNTY RETIREMENT CONTRIBUTION $ 27,520 

SHARED EMPLOYEES $ 117,712 

SHARED FACILITIES $ 6,344 
SUB-TOTAL ALLOCATED EXPENSES 

TOTAL-ALLOCATED EXPENSES 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES 

ESTIMATED WATER FUND SURPLUS (DEFICIT) 



CALCULATION OF GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY: 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
LESS: TOTAL COSTS 
LESS: PRIOR YEAR DEFICIT 

GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 

SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS APPROPRIATED IN ENTERPRISE FUND: 

ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TAXATION 

FREE CASH 

NON-ENTERPRISE AVAILABLE FUNDS 



420,310 



(1,078,724) 



TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS 
APPROPRIATED IN THE WATER ENTERPRISE FUND 



$ 


. 


$ 
$ 
$ 


1,078,724 
(1,078,724) 


$ 


. 


$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 


1,078,724 


$ 


1,078,724 



WATER ENTERPRISE RATE STRUCTURE: 



0-10,000 

10,001-35,000 

35,001 - 70,000 

OVER 70,000 GALLONS 



$20.00 BASE CHARGE EVERY 6 MONTHS 
$1.70 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 
$2.70 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 
$3.70 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 



217 



SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 

FISCAL YEAR 2004 

ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 



$ 208,795 

$ 421,490 

$ 45,000 



SEWER ENTERPRISE REVENUES & AVAILABLE FUNDS: 
USER CHARGES 
TOTAL SEWER REVENUES 

TOTAL COSTS APPROPRIATED IN THE SEWER DEPARTMENT 
ORGANIZATION CODE 61-420-1 AND 61-420-2: 

PERSONNEL 

OPERATIONS 

RESERVE FUND PROJECTS: 
- NEW METERS 

SUB-TOTAL SEWER DEPARTMENT COSTS 

ALLOCATED EXPENSES APPROPRIATED IN OTHER 
DEPARTMENTAL BUDGETS: 
DEBT SERVICE: 

PRINCIPAL 01-710-2 $ 115,000 

INTEREST 01-751-2 $ 96,054 

TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 

INSURANCE 

CNTY RETIREMENT CONTRIBUTION 

SHARED EMPLOYEES 

SHARED FACILITIES 

SUB-TOTAL ALLOCATED EXPENSES 

TOTAL-ALLOCATED EXPENSES 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES 

ESTIMATED SEWER FUND SURPLUS (DEFICIT) 



CALCULATION OF GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY: 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
LESS: TOTAL COSTS 
LESS: PRIOR YEAR DEFICIT 

GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 

SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS APPROPRIATED IN ENTERPRISE FUND: 

ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TAXATION 

FREE CASH 

NON-ENTERPRISE AVAILABLE FUNDS 



,056,719 



,056,719 



$ 


17,680 


$ 


30,577 


$ 


117,712 


$ 


4,411 



$ 675,285 



211,054 



170,380 



$ 381,434 



$ 


1,056,719 


$ 


. 


$ 

$ 
$ 


1,056,719 
1,056,719 


$ 


. 


$ 
$ 
$ 

$ 


1,056,719 



TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS 
APPROPRIATED IN THE SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 



$ 1,056,719 



SEWER ENTERPRISE RATE STRUCTURE: 

RESIDENTIAL BASED ON 75% OF WATER CONSUMPTION 



- 10,000 

10,001 AND OVER 

COMMERCIAL 



- 10,000 

10,001 AND OVER 

SEPTIC DISPOSAL FEE 



$29.60 EVERY 6 MONTHS 

$3.70 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 

BASED ON 100% OF WATER CONSUMPTION 



$37.00 EVERY 6 MONTHS 

$3.70 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 

$110.00/1,000 GAL 



218 



WATER & SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 
ESTABLISHED JULY 1, 1991 (FISCAL YEAR 1992) 
UNDER MASS GENERAL LAWS, CH 40/SECTION 39K 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2004 

WATER 

Total Services 3,804 

Added Services 31 

Thousand Gallons Pumped 51 9,691 ,000 

Thousand Gallons Sold 416,048,000 

Water Retained Earnings - Reserved $ 1,152,549 

Water Retained Earnings - Unreserved $ 267,470 certified 

SEWER 

Total Services 
Added Services 

Sewer Retained Earnings - Reserved $ 78,702 

Sewer Retained Earnings - Unreserved $ 84,339 certified 






219 



PERPETUAL CARE 



Clifford W. Setterlund $ 2,550.00 

Tanya Chermak 425.00 

Shawn & Cindy Collins 2,550.00 

Margaret Wold 425.00 

Craig & Michelle M.Luhrmann 1 ,700.00 

Richard & Julie Desorgher 1 ,700.00 

James & Kathleen Leonard 1 ,700.00 

Dorothy B. Harpster 550.00 

Clayton Balcom 425.00 

Mildred Willis 3,300.00 

Robert K. McCarthy 1,275.00 

Donald Miller 850.00 

Maria K. Mucciaccio 1,700.00 

M. Arlene Regan 550.00 

$19,400.00 



220 



INDEX 



Elected Town Officers 8 

Appointments By 

Assessors, Board of 14 

Fire Chief 15 

Health, Board of 15 

Moderator 1 5 

Planning Board 15 

School Committee 1 5 

Selectmen, Board of 8 

Treasurer/Collector 14 

Warrant Committee 15 

Town Department Reports 

Aging, Council on 68 

Animal Control Officer/Inspector 33 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 27 

Assessors, Board of 28 

Conservation Commission 44 

Fire Department 35 

Health, Board of 61 

Historical Commission 46 

Historic District Commission 50 

Housing Authority 66 

Inspection Department 39 

Library Trustees 56 

Medfield Emergency Management Agency 32 

Memorial Day Address 59 

Memorial Public Library 54 

Memorials, Committee to Study 57 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 75 

Norfolk County Commissioners 73 

Norfolk County Mosquito Control 78 

Parks and Recreation Commission 70 

Planning Board 25 

Police Department 29 

Public Works Department 20 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 43 

Selectmen, Board of 1 8 

Town Clock, Keepers of 53 

Tri County Regional Vocational Technical School 80 

Tree Warden and Insect Pest Control 72 



Veteran's Services 58 

Water and Sewerage Board 23 

School Department Reports 

School Committee 86 

Superintendent of Schools 91 

Staff Directory 93 

Director of Finance and Operations 112 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 1 14 

Graduation Exercises, High School 1 1 7 

Thomas A. Blake Middle School 125 

Dale Street School 130 

Ralph Wheelock School 1 33 

Memorial School 135 

Pupil Services Department 138 

Athletic Director 141 

Community Education Program 148 

Town Clerk's Records 

Births 150 

Marriages 152 

Deaths 154 

Town Meetings and Elections 

Presidential Primary, March 2, 2004 156 

Annual Town Election, March 29, 2004 1 60 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting, April 26, 2004 162 

Special Town Election, June 7, 2004 1 88 

State Primary, September 14, 2004 192 

State Election, November 2, 2004 1 97 

Financial Reports 

Assessors, Board of 203 

Collector of Taxes 204 

Perpetual Care 220 

Town Accountant 208 

Treasurer 205 

Water and Sewer Enterprise Funds 217 



MEDFIELD BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




k ^ ' A 

Lawrence E. Abar 

1968-1972 




IT A 

R. Edward Beard 

1975-198! 




I T :, .......,..Ji^:JJ ; J 

Austin C. Buchanan 
1959-1968 




Herbert B. Burr 

1955-1958 






IT"" ""' UIUI " l A ^ ..-...^A 

Kenneth M. Child*, Jr. Richard G. Connors 

1981-1985 1964-1967 




XT— ' " "A 

Richard P. DeSorgher 

1980-1983 




^ — ^ A 

Arthur J. Farrar 

1973-1976 




^ ^ 

Walter M. Frank 

1967-1970 




IT— — d 
Robert H. Fraser 

1941-1943 




k " A 

John F. Ganiey 

1990-1993 




Charles \V. Haigh 

1934-1937 1940-1946 



M 



Frank G. Haley 

1927-1954 




f 



L A 

John T. Harnev 

1994-2000 




^ A 

Tidal B. Henry 

1993-1996 




k" A 

Harry A. Kelleher 

1968-1977 




Weston G. Kosti 

1970-1973 




k A 

Robert J. Larkin 
1981-1990 





Joseph L. Marcionette 

1947-1964 1971-1975 



William E. McCarthy 

1946-1955 




k— ~ : "Si 

Sandra G. Munsey 

1977-1980 




L A 

Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 

1988-1994 




William F. Nourse 

1985-1988 



c\ 




II A 

Clarence A. Purvis 

1996-1999 





Edward R. Perry 

1963-1966 



Osier L. Peterson 

2000 to Present 
r i 



k~ ' ,L "" m A 

William R. Reagan 

1976-1981 




Paul B. Rhuda 

1999 -Present 




IK — ——j 
Joseph A. Roberts 

1954-1963 




Ann B. Thompson 

1983-Present